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I want it to take as input a set of numbers, such as [1,2,3,4], and only give the subsets with odd sums. For example, [1],[1,2],[2,3] etc.

I haven't tried much, I'm not sure where to start. Sorry, I'm very new to programming, but here's what I have so far. It generates all the possible subsets.

    def rsubsets(s):
        if len(s) == 0:
           return [[]]
        temp = rsubsets(s[1:])
        new = []
        for itm in temp:
           new.append(itm)
        n = len(new)
        for j in range(n):
           new[j] = new[j] + [s[0]]
        return temp + new

Thanks.

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2  
what have you tried? –  inspectorG4dget Dec 2 '12 at 22:05
    
1  
Why not take the return value of all subsets that you've generated, and check for the ones that have an odd sum? –  inspectorG4dget Dec 2 '12 at 22:12
    
Just putting a question mark on the end of the title doesn't make it a question. –  gnibbler Dec 3 '12 at 1:14
    
try itertools.combinations –  tdihp Dec 3 '12 at 10:15
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2 Answers

Build upon your existing function:

def odd_subsets(s):
    return [x for x in rsubsets(s) if sum(s) % 2 == 1]

Or without the comprehension:

def odd_subsets(s):
    odd = []
    for subset in rsubsets(s):
        if sum(s) % 2 == 1:
            odd.append(subset)
    return odd
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How would I put this in the same function? –  user1871071 Dec 2 '12 at 22:40
    
@user1871071: Why do you want to? –  Eric Dec 2 '12 at 22:48
    
My goal was to edit the original function to only output subsets with odd sums. Thanks –  user1871071 Dec 2 '12 at 22:54
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def odd_subsets(s):
    lRet = []
    for i in range(len(s)):
        lRet.extend([c for c in itertools.combinations(s,i+1) if sum(c)%2==1])
    return lRet

If you are dead set on using your initial function this is the easiest way to pull it off

def rsubsets(s):
    def all_subsets(s):
        if len(s) == 0:
           return [[]]
        temp = all_subsets(s[1:])
        new = []
        for itm in temp:
           new.append(itm)
        n = len(new)
        for j in range(n):
           new[j] = new[j] + [s[0]]
        return temp + new
    return [i for i in all_subsets(s) if sum(i)%2==1]

Pretty much what this does is call your initial recursive function and filter the results.

Another way is to use a flag...

def rsubsets(s,bFilter=True):
    if len(s) == 0:
        return [[]]
    temp = rsubsets(s[1:],False)
    new = []
    for itm in temp:
       new.append(itm)
    n = len(new)
    for j in range(n):
       new[j] = new[j] + [s[0]]
    if bFilter:
        return [i for i in temp+new if sum(i)%2 ==1]
    return temp + new
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