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I have the following C# code which is supposed to serialize arbitrary objects to a string, and then of course deserialize it.

public static string Pack(Message _message)
{
   BinaryFormatter formatter = new BinaryFormatter();

   MemoryStream original = new MemoryStream();
   MemoryStream outputStream = new MemoryStream();

   formatter.Serialize(original, _message);
   original.Seek(0, SeekOrigin.Begin);

   DeflateStream deflateStream = new DeflateStream(outputStream, CompressionMode.Compress);
   original.CopyTo(deflateStream);

   byte[] bytearray = outputStream.ToArray();

   UTF8Encoding encoder = new UTF8Encoding();
   string packed = encoder.GetString(bytearray);
   return packed;
} 

public static Message Unpack(string _packed_message)
{
    UTF8Encoding encoder = new UTF8Encoding();
    byte[] bytearray = encoder.GetBytes(_packed_message);

    BinaryFormatter formatter = new BinaryFormatter();

    MemoryStream input = new MemoryStream(bytearray);
    MemoryStream decompressed = new MemoryStream();

    DeflateStream deflateStream = new DeflateStream(input, CompressionMode.Decompress);
    deflateStream.CopyTo(decompressed); // EXCEPTION

    decompressed.Seek(0, SeekOrigin.Begin);

    var message = (Message)formatter.Deserialize(decompressed); // EXCEPTION 2
    return message;
}

But the problem is that any time the code is ran, I am experiencing an exception. Using the above code and invoking it as shown below, I am receiving InvalidDataException: Unknown block type. Stream might be corrupted. at the marked // EXCEPTION line.

After searching for this issue I have attempted to ditch the deflation. This was only a small change: in Pack, bytearray gets created from original.ToArray() and in Unpack, I Seek() input instead of decompressed and use Deserialize(input) instead of decompressed too. The only result which changed: the exception position and body is different, yet it still happens. I receive a SerializationException: No map for object '201326592'. at // EXCEPTION 2.

I don't seem to see what is the problem. Maybe it is the whole serialization idea... the problem is that somehow managing to pack the Message instances is necessary because these objects hold the information that travel between the server and the client application. (Serialization logic is in a .Shared DLL project which is referenced on both ends, however, right now, I'm only developing the server-side first.) It also has to be told, that I am only using string outputs because right now, the TCP connection between the servers and clients are based on string read-write on the ends. So somehow it has to be brought down to the level of strings.

This is how the Message object looks like:

[Serializable]
public class Message
{
    public MessageType type;
    public Client from;
    public Client to;
    public string content;
}

(Client right now is an empty class only having the Serializable attribute, no properties or methods.)

This is how the pack-unpack gets invoked (from Main()...):

 Shared.Message msg = Shared.MessageFactory.Build(Shared.MessageType.DEFAULT, new Shared.Client(), new Shared.Client(), "foobar");

 string message1 = Shared.MessageFactory.Pack(msg);
 Console.WriteLine(message1);

 Shared.Message mess2 = Shared.MessageFactory.Unpack(message1); // Step into... here be exceptions
 Console.Write(mess2.content);

Here is an image showing what happens in the IDE. The output in the console window is the value of message1. Image showing the Exception happening and the output

Some investigation unfortunately also revealed that the problem could lie around the bytearray variable. When running Pack(), after the encoder creates the string, the array contains 152 values, however, after it gets decoded in Unpack(), the array has 160 values instead.

I am appreciating any help as I am really out of ideas and having this problem the progress is crippled. Thank you.

(Update) The final solution:

I would like to thank everyone answering and commenting, as I have reached the solution. Thank you.

Marc Gravell was right, I missed the closing of deflateStream and because of this, the result was either empty or corrupted. I have taken my time and rethought and rewrote the methods and now it works flawlessly. And even the purpose of sending these bytes over the networked stream is working too.

Also, as Eric J. suggested, I have switched to using ASCIIEnconding for the change between string and byte[] when the data is flowing in the Stream.

The fixed code lies below:

public static string Pack(Message _message)
{
    using (MemoryStream input = new MemoryStream())
    {
       BinaryFormatter bformatter = new BinaryFormatter();
       bformatter.Serialize(input, _message);
       input.Seek(0, SeekOrigin.Begin);

       using (MemoryStream output = new MemoryStream())
       using (DeflateStream deflateStream = new DeflateStream(output, CompressionMode.Compress))
       {
           input.CopyTo(deflateStream);
           deflateStream.Close();

           return Convert.ToBase64String(output.ToArray());
       }
    }
}

public static Message Unpack(string _packed)
{
    using (MemoryStream input = new MemoryStream(Convert.FromBase64String(_packed)))
    using (DeflateStream deflateStream = new DeflateStream(input, CompressionMode.Decompress))
    using (MemoryStream output = new MemoryStream())
    {
        deflateStream.CopyTo(output);
        deflateStream.Close();
        output.Seek(0, SeekOrigin.Begin);

        BinaryFormatter bformatter = new BinaryFormatter();
        Message message = (Message)bformatter.Deserialize(output);
        return message;
    }
}

Now everything happens just right, as the screenshot proves below. This was the expected output from the first place. The Server and Client executables communicate with each other and the message travels... and it gets serialized and unserialized properly.

Image showing proper output

share|improve this question
    
What does uncompressed refer to? Is Client marked [Serializable]? – Eric J. Dec 2 '12 at 22:13
    
@EricJ. Yes, Client is serializable. And it is decompressed... it would be the stream we inflate back the deflated output. – Whisperity Dec 2 '12 at 22:14
    
You have a line in Pack() that does not compile uncompressed.CopyTo(deflateStream); What does uncompressed refer to there? – Eric J. Dec 2 '12 at 22:15
    
@EricJ. Oh Sorry... yeah I used the word original instead of uncompressed in the question body while the code contains the name uncompressed. I have fixed the question. It was meant to mean the MemoryStream original which contains the serialized object. – Whisperity Dec 2 '12 at 22:19
up vote 3 down vote accepted

In addition to the existing observations about Encoding vs base-64, note you haven't closed the deflate stream. This is important because compression-streams buffer: if you don't close, it may not write the end. For a short stream, that may mean it writes nothing at all.

using(DeflateStream deflateStream = new DeflateStream(
    outputStream, CompressionMode.Compress))
{
    original.CopyTo(deflateStream);
}
return Convert.ToBase64String(outputStream.GetBuffer(), 0,
    (int)outputStream.Length);
share|improve this answer
1  
Probably explains my observation of a 0-byte array. – Eric J. Dec 2 '12 at 22:50

Your problem is most probably in the UTF8 encoding. Your bytes are not really a character string and UTF-8 is a encoding with different byte lengths for characters. This means the byte array may not correspond to a correctly encoded UTF-8 string (there may be some bytes missing at the end for instance.)

Try using UTF16 or ASCII which are constant length encodings (the resulting string will likely contain control characters so it won't be printable or transmitable through something like HTTP or email.)

But if you want to encode as a string it is customary to use UUEncoding to convert the byte array into a real printable string, then you can use any encoding you want.

share|improve this answer
    
That was my first thought too, but I do believe that it is unlikely (but possible) that the not-exactly-bijective mapping between a byte array and UTF8 string is the problem. Note that UTF16 will not work for odd byte lengths. – Eric J. Dec 2 '12 at 22:17
    
Then use ASCII, UTF8 won't work for a lot more specific strings than UTF16. – Eli Algranti Dec 2 '12 at 22:18
    
Have you tried it without the string encoding, i.e. passing the bytes as is. This will help you zero in on the problem. – Eli Algranti Dec 2 '12 at 22:19
    
I will say with full confidence that this is the problem. The only way to encode an arbitrary byte[] as a string is via something like Convert.ToBase64String – Marc Gravell Dec 2 '12 at 22:21
    
It won't be transfered over HTTP or email, only a simple TCP connection: a NetworkStream object's Write() and Read() methods. – Whisperity Dec 2 '12 at 22:22

When I run the following Main() code against your Pack() and Unpack():

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Message msg = new Message() { content = "The quick brown fox" };

        string message1 = Pack(msg);
        Console.WriteLine(message1);

        Message mess2 = Unpack(message1); // Step into... here be exceptions
        Console.Write(mess2.content);
    }

I see that the bytearray

byte[] bytearray = outputStream.ToArray();

is empty.

I did modify your serialized class slightly since you did not post code for the included classes

public enum MessageType
{
    DEFAULT = 0
}

[Serializable]
public class Message
{
    public MessageType type;
    public string from;
    public string to;
    public string content;
}

I suggest the following steps to resolve this:

  • Check the intermediate results along the way. Do you also see 0 bytes in the array? What is the string value returned by Pack()?
  • Dispose of your streams once you are done with them. The easiest way to do that is with the using keyword.

Edit

As Eli and Marc correctly pointed out, you cannot store arbitrary bytes in a UTF8 string. The mapping is not bijective (you can't go back and forth without loss/distortion of information). You will need a mapping that is bijective, such as the Convert.ToBase64String() approach Marc suggests.

share|improve this answer
    
There is something amiss. I am using the Base64 encoding now and on the Pack() side, the buffer is byte[256], but when converting back in Unpack(), I only get a byte[218]. – Whisperity Dec 3 '12 at 15:00
    
@Whisperity: I think the problem is that you are not properly flushing your streams. Make sure you close/dispose (which closes) them appropriately. The best thing to do is make use of using statements. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/yh598w02.aspx – Eric J. Dec 3 '12 at 16:19

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