Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

what do "=&" / "&=" operators in php mean? where can I read info about them? searching google doesn't help

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 50 down vote accepted

$a &= $b is short for $a = $a & $b which is the bitwise-and operator.

$a =& $b assigns $a as a reference to $b.

share|improve this answer
8  
or php.net: php.net/manual/en/language.operators.bitwise.php –  stefita Sep 2 '09 at 12:43
4  
he said he couldn't find it on google. –  geowa4 Sep 2 '09 at 12:44
27  
it's hard to google for special characters :) –  Michael Krelin - hacker Sep 2 '09 at 12:46
7  
I don't think there's a =& operator. It's a combination of = (assignment) and unary & (referencing) operators. –  Michael Krelin - hacker Sep 2 '09 at 12:46
3  
@hacker: Using a common name for the special character usually works well, e.g. "ampersand php". –  GZipp Sep 2 '09 at 13:00
show 10 more comments

=&

From my previous comment: $a =& $b literally assigns $a as a reference to $b. If the value or reference of $a is changed, the value or reference of $b will change accordingly.

This differs from "both pointing to the same place" when it comes to objects: I could do $c = $d = new AnObject(), and both variables would point to the same place; however, changing where one points would not change where the other points. That is, $c = null would not make $d = null, but $a = null would make $b = null.

This has two purposes. With scalar values, it's sort of like wrapping the value in an object, so that you can change the value universally amongst several variables. For example:

$original = 1;
$copy = $original;
$reference =& $original;
// All three variables == 1.

$reference = 2;
// $original == 2, $reference == 2, $copy == 1

$original = 3;
// $original == 3, $reference == 3, $copy == 1

$copy = 4;
// $original == 3, $reference == 3, $copy == 4

With types that are normally passed by reference (objects), &= provides a reference to a reference. This is where things get confusing.

#!/usr/bin/env php
<?php
class Object
{
        private $properties;

        public function __construct(array $properties = array())
        {
                $this->properties = $properties;
        }

        public function __isset($key)
        {
                return isset($this->properties[$key]);
        }

        public function __unset($key)
        {
                unset($this->properties[$key]);
        }

        public function __get($key)
        {
                return isset($this->$key) ? $this->properties[$key] : null;
        }

        public function __set($key, $value)
        {
                $this->properties[$key] = $value;
        }

        public function __toString()
        {
                return print_r($this->properties, true);
        }
}

function print_vars()
{
        global $original, $ref, $refref;

        echo
                '$original: ', $original,
                '$ref: ', $ref,
                '$refref: ', $refref,
                PHP_EOL;
}

$original = new Object(array('a' => 1, 'b' => 2, 'c' => 3));
$ref = $original;
$refref =& $original;
print_vars();
/*
$original: Array
(
    [a] => 1
    [b] => 2
    [c] => 3
)
$ref: Array
(
    [a] => 1
    [b] => 2
    [c] => 3
)
$refref: Array
(
    [a] => 1
    [b] => 2
    [c] => 3
)
*/

$original->a = 'duck';
$ref->b = 'moose';
$refref->c = 'cow';
print_vars();
/*
$original: Array
(
    [a] => duck
    [b] => moose
    [c] => cow
)
$ref: Array
(
    [a] => duck
    [b] => moose
    [c] => cow
)
$refref: Array
(
    [a] => duck
    [b] => moose
    [c] => cow
)
*/

// This carries over to $refref, but not $ref.
$original = new Object(array('x' => 1, 'y' => 2, 'z' => 3));
print_vars();
/*
$original: Array
(
    [x] => 1
    [y] => 2
    [z] => 3
)
$ref: Array
(
    [a] => duck
    [b] => moose
    [c] => cow
)
$refref: Array
(
    [x] => 1
    [y] => 2
    [z] => 3
)
 */

// This does *not* carry over to $original or $ref.
$ref = new Object(array('o' => 42, 'm' => 123, 'n' => 1337));
print_vars();
/*
$original: Array
(
    [x] => 1
    [y] => 2
    [z] => 3
)
$ref: Array
(
    [o] => 42
    [m] => 123
    [n] => 1337
)
$refref: Array
(
    [x] => 1
    [y] => 2
    [z] => 3
)
*/

// This *does* carry over to $original, but not $ref.
$refref = new Object(array('alpha' => 10, 'beta' => 20, 'gamma' => 30));
print_vars();
/*
$original: Array
(
    [alpha] => 10
    [beta] => 20
    [gamma] => 30
)
$ref: Array
(
    [o] => 42
    [m] => 123
    [n] => 1337
)
$refref: Array
(
    [alpha] => 10
    [beta] => 20
    [gamma] => 30
)
*/
?>

It's easy to use =& on objects/arrays and expect the same effect that it has on scalars. Be careful, as this will lead to very odd and difficult-to-debug errors.

Think of $a =& $b as an alias operation: $a becomes an alias for $b. For all intents and purposes, $a behaves just like be. Assigning to $a assigns to $b, and vice versa. $a doesn't point to the same place in memory as $b: it points to $b itself.

&=

&= is unrelated to =&. It comes from a set of assignment operations. Here's just a few:

  • +=
  • -=
  • *=
  • /=

See the trend here?

Binary arithmetic operators generally have assignment counterparts. Let's say @ were an arithmetic operator (it's not as of writing) such that $a @ $b generally yields a number when $a and $b are numbers. (Think: Addition, multiplication, division, etc.) How often do you need to do something like this?

$a = $a @ $b;

Pretty often. Doesn't it seem a bit unnecessary to repeat $a? Many languages, including PHP, solve this with an array of assignment operators:

$a @= $b;

Much simpler, and to a programmer accustomed to this notation, perhaps more concise and descriptive at a glance. (I certainly find it easier to read, since I'm so used to it.) So to double a variable:

$a *= 2;

Quick, easy, and relatively descriptive. Some languages, including PHP, extend this feature beyond arithmetic for an extra operation or two. Notably:

$a = $a . 'Appended text';
// Is the same as:
$a .= 'Appended text';

Very useful.

&= falls among these assignment operators, because & represents a bitwise arithmetic AND operation. There are a few others listed in the PHP documentation (see aforementioned link), all of which are common to many programming languages.

This means that $a &= $b is the same as $a = $a & $b.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.