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I need a different way to have global access to 160*160 bits of data, that wont cause me to run out of ram. I am trying to create a back buffer for a 160*160 LCD black and white screen. so 160*10 ints gives me 160*160 bits because a int is 16bits. However I am running out of RAM on the board. Does anyone have a way to this where I wont use the ram? maybe allocating in someway? but I cant seem to get a proper way to allocate a 2d array. Is there any other way of doing this?

edit: it is a msp430 rbx430 board,(here is a link to a picture of it http://i.ytimg.com/vi/rr18why8wzY/0.jpg ) and yes int's are 16bits on this device. longs and doubles are 32bits. the device has 64k memory, and I am running it at 16mhz. I am asking for 3,200 bytes

as for it making sense, how does it not? I have a 64k device, where int's are 16bits. I am creating a map for the 160*160 lcd screen by using the 1's and 0's to keep track of when a pixel is on or off. after i turn on all the pixels i want, i then take my map and apply it to the lcd. This way I do not have to draw to the lcd then erase the lcd then draw again. I can simply draw, and then draw over it. this will make it so it will not flicker.

effectively creating a back buffer to draw to the lcd.

static int lcdPixels[160][10];

    /*Must call this before using RBX430_graphics*/
    void initGraphics(void)
    {

        int h = 0;
        int w = 0;

        for(h=0; h < ROW_SIZE; h++)
        {
            for(w=0; w < COLUMN_SIZE; w++)
            {
                lcdPixels[h][w] = 0;
            }
        }
    }

---------------------------------here is the rest-----------------------

void pixelOn(int posX, int posY)
{
    // first grab the right column
    int column = ( ((float)posX/16.0f) + 0.9f);
    // next grab the right bit
    int bit = posX;
    while(bit > 16)
    {
        bit = bit - 16;
    }

    //turn on the bit/pixel
    lcdPixels[posY][column] |= (1 << bit);
}

void pixelOFF(int posX, int posY)
{
    // first grab the right column
    int column = ( ((float)posX/16.0f) + 0.9f);
    // next grab the right bit
    int bit = posX;
    while(bit > 16)
    {
        bit = bit - 16;
    }

    //turn off the bit/pixel
    lcdPixels[posY][column] &= ~(1 << bit);
}

/* Call this to commit the current backBuffer to the LCD display*/
void commitBuffer(void)
{
    int h = 0;
    int w = 0;
    int k = 0;

    for(h=0; h < ROW_SIZE; h++)
    {
        for(w=0; w < COLUMN_SIZE; w++)
        {
            for(k=0; k < INT_SIZE; k++)
            {
                if((lcdPixels[h][w] & (1 << k)) >> k)
                {
                    lcd_point(((w * 16) + k), h, ON);
                }
                else
                {
                    lcd_point(((w * 16) + k), h, OFF);
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

So i now tried to allocate the array using malloc, and that is a no go as well. I guess I just can not do this, 160*160 bits is just to much data....

share|improve this question
    
A side note: Last time I checked, an int was 32 bits. 16 bits is only from 0 to 65535 (the unsigned version) while int is -2147483648 to 2147483647 (signed) –  Simon André Forsberg Dec 2 '12 at 22:30
    
@Simon - That depends on the platform. Even on desktop machines, once upon a time on MS-DOS having 16-bit int was pretty common. I wouldn't be surprised if the current standard guarantees 32 bits for int, but the current standard wasn't always the current standard. –  Steve314 Dec 2 '12 at 22:35
    
@Steve314 Good point there. I did not think about that. –  Simon André Forsberg Dec 2 '12 at 22:38
    
it is a msp430 board, and yes int's are 16bits on this device. longs and doubles are 32bits. the device has 64k memory, I am asking for 3,200 bytes. –  WIllJBD Dec 2 '12 at 22:43
    
i.ytimg.com/vi/rr18why8wzY/0.jpg this is a picture of the boards I am using –  WIllJBD Dec 2 '12 at 22:55

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Do you have 64K of RAM or 64K of Flash memory? I think the RBX430 has a msp430f2274 on it (http://www.ti.com/product/msp430f2274) which only has 1K of RAM.

share|improve this answer
1  
64k flash likely. The total size of all memory locations together is 64k. So do I need to allocate it? –  WIllJBD Dec 3 '12 at 0:23
1  
Confirm the the processor part number so that we know precisely how much memory is available. –  ekb Dec 3 '12 at 0:35
2  
If it's 64k of flash, using it as a back buffer for a display seems a very bad idea. First, writes to flash are slow, especially after the first write cycle when you have an erase cycle first. Second, flash wears out quickly - the usual figure is IIRC around 10,000 write cycles per cell. At 30 fps that's less than 6 minutes to kill the chip. Not that you'd get 30 frames per second. Next, I'd expect flash in most embedded CPUs to seem like ROM when you're running anyway - ie it's somewhere to put code and constants, not variables. If you have 1K RAM, you need to work without a back buffer. –  Steve314 Dec 3 '12 at 10:09
1  
The M430F2274 only has 1K of RAM which is where the pixel buffer would be located. As mentioned above, FLASH memory cannot be used for this operation. You have 25600 pixels to manage which if you only allocated 1 bit, then you would need (160*160/8 = ) 3200 bytes which is still larger than your available RAM. You will need to directly manipulate the display memory. –  ekb Dec 3 '12 at 11:02
1  
Flash is where the program code and constants get located. RAM is where your variables get located. On these small processors, RAM conservation is a big deal. –  ekb Dec 3 '12 at 11:04

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