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I'm trying to make a stack implementation in C++ but when I try to print the stack, it just prints the first element instead of the whole stack. I've tested it and I'm pretty sure that my Push function is right, but I'm not sure.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include "stack.h"

int main(){

    StackElement *stack = new StackElement();
    stack->data = 20;
    stack->Push(30,stack);
    stack->Push(40,stack);

    stack->Print(stack);

}

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>


class StackElement{

public:

    int data;   
    StackElement* next;     
    StackElement();     
    void StackElement::Push(int value, StackElement *oldElement);   
    void StackElement::Print(StackElement *element); 
};

StackElement::StackElement(){
    next = NULL;
}


void StackElement::Push(int value, StackElement *oldElement){

    StackElement *newElement = new StackElement();                
    newElement->data = value;       
    printf("Element added to stack: %d\n", newElement->data);       
    oldElement->next = newElement;       
}


void StackElement::Print(StackElement *element){

    while(element->next != NULL){       
        printf("%d\n",element->data);       
        element = element->next;    
    }

}
share|improve this question
    
please, properly indent your code, one statement per line. – akappa Dec 2 '12 at 23:39
2  
Sorry about that. I'm working on it at the moment. – Adam Dec 2 '12 at 23:42
    
Your Push and Print are both wrong. Which do you want help with first? – Beta Dec 2 '12 at 23:46
    
Could I have help with the push function first please? – Adam Dec 2 '12 at 23:48
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your code kept loosing the previous pushed element, leaking memory, as @Beta described.

I suggest comparing my code below to your code. You'll see, I've moved the handling of the stack elements outside, just to be able to keep track of the first element. Also, notice that there is no pointer in the main function. That is what we expect from a class.

Stack_element is a struct really as there's not much point in making the Stack_element itself encapsulated, it is just an implementation detail of Stack.

So here's my code derived from yours

#include<iostream>

struct Stack_element{
  int data;
  Stack_element*next;
};   

class Stack{
private:
  Stack_element*last_data, first_data;

public:

  Stack():last_data(NULL), first_data(NULL){}  
  void push(int data);
  void print() const;  
};

void Stack::push(int data)
{
  Stack_element*p=new Stack_element();
  p->data=data;
  p->next=NULL;
  if(last_data)
    last_data->next=p;
  else // empty stack
    first_data=p;
  last_data=p;
}

void Stack::print()
{
  for(Stack_element*p=first_data;p;p=p->next)
    std::cout << p->data << std::endl; // ** Do not use printf in c++. Ever. **
}    

and in the main function just call

Stack stack;
stack.push(30);
stack.push(40);
stack.print();

REMARK: For a C++ish print you might want to do an ostream& print(ostream& os) instead, where

std::ostream& Stack::print(std::ostream& os)
{
  for(Stack_element*p=first_data;p;p=p->next)
    os << p->data << std::endl;
  return os;
} 

just to be able to write std::cout << stack.print() << std::endl;. The benefit of this is that you can easily redirect to a file.

std::ofstream ofs("yourfile.txt");
ofs << stack.print() << std::endl; // prints to file instead of screen.
share|improve this answer
    
fixed a typo in my answer now you can compile. – Barnabas Szabolcs Dec 3 '12 at 0:09
1  
Your Stack::print should return a std::ostream&. An annoying mistake I too make constantly when defining operator<< – Managu Dec 3 '12 at 0:50
    
point taken, yeah a nice IDE would've nagged me already, corrected. – Barnabas Szabolcs Dec 3 '12 at 1:08

Suppose this much works as planned:

StackElement *stack = new StackElement();
stack->data = 20;
stack->Push(30,stack);

Now your data looks like [20]->[30]

Now you attempt

stack->Push(40,stack);

So the Push method creates a new StackElement, gives it the value 40, and sets Stack to point to it: [20]->[40]. Notice that [30] has been lost.

Then the Print function:

while(element->next != NULL){       
  printf("%d\n",element->data);       
  element = element->next;    
}

If there is only one element (whose next is NULL), this function will quit and print nothing. If there are two, this function will print the data of the first, then quit. And there will never be more than two, as long as Push has that bug.

share|improve this answer
    
It still looks horrible with this from the outside, with this full of pointers and unnecessary arguments in the functions. Not to mention that we don't use printf in c++. – Barnabas Szabolcs Dec 3 '12 at 0:01
    
So is there any way I could fix push by maybe returning the new stack [20]->[30] and having the function operate on the top element of the new stack some how? Sorry if I'm being unclear, and also thank you, your answer is just what I was looking for. – Adam Dec 3 '12 at 0:02
1  
@Adam, if you want 20->30->40, you must iterate to the end of the chain before you create and append a new element. If you want 40->30->20 you must set newElement->next=this; (not the other way around), return(newElement); and call it as e.g. stack=stack->Push(40);. Either way, once you have it working you'll see many ways to improve it, notably by enclosing StackElement in a Stack class as @BarnabasSzabolcs suggested. – Beta Dec 3 '12 at 1:47
    
Thank you guys, I appreciate all your help. – Adam Dec 3 '12 at 3:38

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