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I have an azure ACS service, which trusts an IP-STS.
For an active scenario, I first get a JWT token from my IP-STS using username, password credentials. There is Oauth2 endpoint and everything works quite well. Is it possible to "exchange" this IP-STS token for a JWT token issued by my azure ACS ? If so, is there an example of code that does this. (To make things worse, all my code is in JavaScript (actually TypeScript) but that doesn't really matter).

Update : I'm working on your hint with the ACS OAuth2 draft 13 endpoint.
I proceed as follows : I ask my custom STS (ThinkTecture STS) to give me a JWT token for the "ACS OAuth2 draft 13 endpoint" realm. This requires an oAuth client id and secret which are global in the TT STS and I assume they are irrelevant. In the TT STS management I have a symmetric key configured for this realm : key1. I receive the 3-part JWT token. The signature on the token is indeed made with key1. I then pass this token to ACS with client id and secret from a service identity and parameters as specified

var form = new FormUrlEncodedContent(new Dictionary<string, string>
{
  { "grant_type", "http://oauth.net/grant_type/jwt/1.0/bearer" },
  { "assertion", rawtoken (the header dot body dot signature form TT STS },
  { "scope", "http://localhost"}
});

Unfortunately I now get {"error":"invalid_client","error_description":"ACS50027: JWT token is invalid. \r\nTrace ID: b107cda5-393b-4b50-b14a-ebaa0ac41913\r\nTimestamp: 2012-12-05 08:58:10Z"}

I understand JWT is in beta and therefore ACS50027 is not yet documented. The hard part is that there is no known way to debug this. Thanks for nay help.

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3 Answers

This is definitely possible, but I don't think any of the existing ACS samples do it so you're slightly in uncharted territory.

The approach I would recommend is to use the ACS OAuth2 draft 13 endpoint (as in this sample, but JWT instead of SAML and IdP instead of service identity). The request would be something like:

grant_type=http://oauth.net/grant_type/jwt/1.0/bearer&assertion=(JWT)&scope=(RP realm).

You'll need the issuer of the JWT to match your registered identity provider, along with an associated signing key, plus rules to pass through or change any claims as necessary and the RP to have a token type of JWT.

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Specifically, the GetOauth2ResponseFromAcs() function in the linked sample should help you. –  Oren Melzer Dec 3 '12 at 22:56
    
ok, thanks, I'll definitely try that. There is a great lack of documentation on these kind of things. I was currently investigating boegawoega.accesscontrol.windows.net/v2/wstrust/13/… to do the exchange. I think your approach will genereally be easier. –  Willy Van den Driessche Dec 4 '12 at 23:41
    
You could do WS-Trust as well, but it'd be a bit harder (for XML-based protocols, ACS wraps JWTs in a BinarySecurityToken and Base64-encodes it). –  Oren Melzer Dec 5 '12 at 2:55
    
Ok, I finally found a way to do this. Your hint was crucial for the success. The (very) tricky part is that the IP-STS uses a symmetric key to sign the JWT token. I had to programmatically (using the odata api) insert this key in the ACS backoffice under the Identity provider. (the managament console does not show this key anywhere) Everything is nearly fine. The only trouble is that the ACS copies the audience ("aud") from the original token, while I request a token for a different audience ("scope"). Any ideas there ? –  Willy Van den Driessche Dec 6 '12 at 8:28
    
Ok, I found the last bit. I was looking at the same token twice, which explains why the audience is the same ;-) Anyway, this all works. Thanks a lot there ! –  Willy Van den Driessche Dec 7 '12 at 15:25
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Ok, I finally found a way to do this. Your hint was crucial for the success. The (very) tricky part is that the IP-STS uses a symmetric key to sign the JWT token. I had to programmatically (using the odata api) insert this key in the ACS backoffice under the Identity provider. (the managament console does not show this key anywhere) Everything is nearly fine. The only trouble is that the ACS copies the audience ("aud") from the original token, while I request a token for a different audience ("scope"). Any ideas there ?

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Nope, You can't Exchange tokens in ACS. The only possibly viable way of doing so, is if you are able to register your IP-STS as an IdP in ACS (you will be able to do so, if your IP-STS supports WS-TRUST protocol). This will throw you on the passive scenario.

The only possible active scenario way is to get JWT token directly from ACS using Username/Password authentication with Service Identities. Well managing service identities in ACS is not as managing ASP.NET Membership provider, but it has a Management API.

The possible ways for authenticating with a Service Identity is Password, Symmetric Key, X.509 Certificate. So, if you twist enough your original IP-STS, to give you a Symmetric Key as a Claim in its JWT token, you will be able to get JWT token from ACS using Service Identity authenticating with that Symmetric Key.

But, if you already have a JWT token, why you need another one from ACS?

UPDATE

Well, the claims transformations are only option in the "Passive" mode. For active mode, the only way (that I know) is to use Service Identities, thus no claims transformations.

The issue with Passive is that because of security reasons, ACS will create a hidden POST form to POST submit transformed token to your Relying Party Application (RP). So there is no way to Actively get a Passive behavior. What you could do just for the sake for trial, and that will fail because of the passive POST in hidden form is the following: If you are willing to experiment (and I have not tested and I am totally unaware of the result), you may try simulating wsignin1.0 action providing the original JWT token. You can look at the WS-Federation Passive Requestor Profile, section 3.1 on how to construct a Sign-In request. You can also use Fiddler to fully track a Passive scenario chain of events. The one that you shall try reconstruct is the wsignin1.0 request that goes from the registered IdP back to ACS.

At some point you will have the resulted HTML, which contains a FORM element. That form will have two hidden fields - wa with value of wsignin1.0 and wresult which will contain URL encoded <t:RequestSecurityTokenResponse xmlns:t="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/ws/2005/02/trust">.... This is what you want.

If you succeed in recreating the original SignIn request to ACS from your IdP, than this will work.

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My STS is registred as an identity provider in ACS. I don't want to use service identities. I want to have a real identity. But, if you already have a JWT token, why you need another one from ACS? for two reasons : I don't intend to add each ip as an issuer to each client. Second : I want to use ACS to make sure the claims I get from any IP are "similar", in other words, I need the claims transformations. These two reasons explain what I am trying to get done. –  Willy Van den Driessche Dec 3 '12 at 8:05
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