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I have a script that changes a dict to a string and saves it to a file. I'd like to then load that file and use it as a dict, but it's a string. Is there something like int("7") that can change a string formatted as a dict ({a: 1, b: 2}) into a dict? I've tried dict(), but this doesn't seem to be what it does. I've heard of some process involving JSON and eval(), but I don't really see what this does. The program loads the same data it saves, and if someone edits it and it doesn't work, it's no problem of mine (I don't need any advanced method of confirming the dict data or anything).

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marked as duplicate by bluefeet Jul 17 at 20:33

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If you are trying to serialize a dict why don't you just use pickle? –  Matteo Italia Dec 3 '12 at 1:31
    
@MatteoItalia pickle? –  tkbx Dec 3 '12 at 1:32
    
Yeah, why are you doing this in the first place? –  Matthew Adams Dec 3 '12 at 1:32
    
@MatthewAdams What do you mean? –  tkbx Dec 3 '12 at 1:33
1  
Oh, I misread your question. Yeah you want to serialize the dictionary; pickle is one way to do that. –  Matthew Adams Dec 3 '12 at 1:35

4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Try this, it's the safest way:

import ast
ast.literal_eval("{'x':1, 'y':2}")
=> {'y': 2, 'x': 1}

All the solutions based in eval() are dangerous, malicious code could be injected inside the string and get executed.

According to the documentation the expression gets evaluated safely. Also, according to the source code, literal_eval parses the string to a python AST (source tree), and returns only if it is a literal. The code is never executed, only parsed, so there is no reason for it to be a security risk.

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2  
I didn't know about ast module, thanks for this one! –  Aif Dec 3 '12 at 1:35
    
Why is this safer? Isn't it susceptible to the same problem? –  Matthew Adams Dec 3 '12 at 1:36
    
Oh, found the answer. It's because ast.literal_eval only works on literals. source –  Matthew Adams Dec 3 '12 at 1:39
    
@MatthewAdams according to the documentation the expression gets evaluated safely. Also, according to the source, literal_eval parses the string to a python AST (source tree), and returns only if it is a literal. The code is never executed, only parsed, so there is no reason to be a security risk –  Óscar López Dec 3 '12 at 1:40
    
Cool. I knew about ast, but I wouldn't have thought of using it here. +1 –  Matthew Adams Dec 3 '12 at 1:42

This format is not JSON, but YAML, which you can parse with PyYAML:

>>> import yaml
>>> s = '{a: 1, b: 2}'
>>> d = yaml.load(s)
>>> d
{'a': 1, 'b': 2}
>>> type(d)
<type 'dict'>
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This successfully converts it. Using json libraries or dict() on the string will fail. Thanks. –  NuclearPeon Aug 27 '13 at 17:44

Serialization

What you are talking about doing is object serialization, and there are better ways of doing it than rolling your own serialization method (though you seem to have come up with YAML). Both of these are still less secure than the ast.literal_eval() approach (pickle particularly), but they definitely should be noted here.

JSON

Here is an example of doing what you want using JSON, a popular cross-language format:

import json

myDict = {'a':1, 'b':2}

# write to the file 'data'
with open('data','w') as f:
    json.dump(myDict, f)

# now we can load it back
with open('data','r') as f:
    myDictLoaded = json.load(f)

print myDictLoaded

Output:

{u'a': 1, u'b': 2}

pickle

Here is a second example doing the same thing using pickle. pickle is more powerful in that it can serialize all* python objects, even ones you write.

import cPickle as pickle

myDict = {'a':1, 'b':2}

# write to the file 'data'
with open('data','w') as f:
    pickle.dump(myDict, f)

# now we can load it back
with open('data','r') as f:
    myDictLoaded = pickle.load(f)

print myDictLoaded

Output:

{'a': 1, 'b': 2}
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You can use eval if you trust the input string.

>>> a=eval('{"a":1,"b":2}')
>>> a
{'a': 1, 'b': 2}
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1  
However, for the sake of completeness, it should be noted that using eval is generally a bad idea. –  kuyan Dec 3 '12 at 1:33
    
And ast.literal_eval is sufficient here. Note that however, the format mentioned in the question ({a: 1, b: 2}) is not actually Python code. –  phihag Dec 3 '12 at 1:34
1  
@tkbx: eval would be okay if you're completely confident that the output is safe. But, if you don't, it could be as bad as feeding data from online directly into the command line - for example, if somebody swapped the expected input with an os.system call. –  kuyan Dec 3 '12 at 1:40
1  
@tkbx Haha, yeah but someone could swap out the file you're reading from with a file containing malicious python code and the eval in your program would happily run it. –  Matthew Adams Dec 3 '12 at 1:40
2  
@tkbx Is it really important in this specific situation? Probably not. But the principle is definitely important. What if the people that wrote Microsoft Word took the same approach? If a hacker discovered that all they had to do to gain control of a system was modify one file, then that makes their "job" a whole lot easier. It's good to code with security in mind. –  Matthew Adams Dec 3 '12 at 14:54

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