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I'm having a bit of trouble with a small Javascript library that I am creating for practice that mimics jQuery and other libraries. As of now it does not work. I'm very new to Javascript and to scripting in general as I have only started teaching myself, so chances are I'm simply missing something that would be obvious to most. I have tried searching for a solution, but I have not been able to find one, so I have resorted to asking about it myself.

This is the library itself:

(function(window, undefined) {
var document = window.document
var $m = function(obj) {
if (typeof obj === "object") {
    return obj
}
else {
    return document.getElementById(obj)
}

class: function(name){
    var ele = document.getElementsByTagName('*')
    var objects = []

    for (var q = 0 ; q < ele.length ; ++q){
    if (ele[q].className === name){
        objects.push(ele[q])
    }
    }
    return objects
}

s: function(){
    return this.style
}

window.$m = $m

})(window)

A brief edit: $m is intended to be an object with methods class and s.

And this is how it is referenced in a simple test page:

<h1 class="heading" onmouseover="$m(this).s.setAttribute('text-decoration', 'underline')" onmouseout="$m(this).s.setAttribute('text-decoration', 'none')">Testing.</h1>

Another edit: I have attempted to do this, and although it throws no errors it does not work correctly. I'm a bit stumped with what exactly is not being called.

Here is the new library:

(function(window, undefined) {
    //set document to this local scope
    var document = window.document
    //create $m object
    var $m = function(obj) {
    //if it is anything but an element return itself
        if (typeof obj === "object") {
        return new init(obj);
        }
    //if it is an element return that element
        else {
        return new init(document.getElementById(obj));
        }
    }

    function init(elem){
        //set properties
        this.elem = elem;
    }

    init.prototype = {
        //return style
        sty: function() {
            return this.elem.style;
        },

            //return all objects with a certain class

        cla: function() {
        var allelem = document.getElementsByTagName('*')
        var give = []

        //gather all elements in the document and get those with matching class
            for (var q = 0 ; q < allelem.length ; ++q){
        if (allelem[q].className === this.elem.className){
            give.push(allelem[q]);
        }
        }
        //return found elements
        return give;
    }
    }
    //expose $m to global scope
    window.$m = $m;
})(window)

and an attempt to fix how it is referenced:

<h1 class="heading" id="test" onmouseover="$m(this).sty.textDecoration='underline'" onmouseout="$m(this).sty.textDecoration='none'">Testing.</h1>
share|improve this question
2  
Use a) indentation b) more semicolons –  Bergi Dec 3 '12 at 2:17
    
Your syntax is simply invalid. I'd suggest learning more of the basics before creating a library. –  I Hate Lazy Dec 3 '12 at 2:19
    
@user1689607: Apart from the missing brace and the use of a reserved word, it is valid code. –  Bergi Dec 3 '12 at 2:31
1  
@Bergi: Sure, apart from the invalid stuff, it's valid. :P But the use of class: is actually valid code, but some older browsers don't like it. –  I Hate Lazy Dec 3 '12 at 2:36
2  
I'd advise you to watch the hubris. Learn to walk before you run. A new JS programmer is not going to reinvent jQuery, any more than a first-time musician is gonna play like Hendrix or a first-time carpenter is going to build a personal copy of the White House. People build up to that kind of complexity. –  cHao Dec 3 '12 at 2:59

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There's a couple of things wrong here. First, as user1689607 says, your syntax is invalid; you want (I think) the following for the last part:

function class(name){
    var ele = document.getElementsByTagName('*')
    var objects = []

    for (var q = 0 ; q < ele.length ; ++q){
        if (ele[q].className === name){
            objects.push(ele[q])
        }
    }
    return objects
}

function s() {
    return this.style
}

This still won't work, though, since class is a reserved word.

Furthermore, your code from further up isn't going to allow you to do what you're trying to do in your HTML. What you're looking for is to create a new object containing the parameter you pass to $ as a field, with the functions you've defined as members.

Try the following:

function MyObjConstructor(param) {
    this.field = param;
}

MyObjConstructor.prototype = 
{
    s:function(){...}//As your S function, but replace "this" with "this.field"
    clazz:function(){...}//As your class function, but replace "this" with "this.field"
}

and finally

function $m(obj) {
    if (typeof obj === "object") {
        return new MyObjConstructor(obj);
    }
    else {
        return new MyObjConstructor(document.getElementById(obj));
    }
}

This results in each object that is passed to your $ function being wrapped, and exposing the appropriate methods. I'm not sure how jQuery does it, but this is probably a good place to start.

share|improve this answer
class: function(name){ … }

s: function(){ … }

I don't know what you expect those statements to do. Usually, something like this appears in an object literal, but in here you just have labeled statements. Also, you are missing a closing brace somewhere.

From your usage, it seems you want them to be properties of the returned object. As you return a plain DOM element, you would need to extend them with those custom properties:

var el = document.getElementById(obj);
el["class"] = function(name){ … }; // notice that "class" is a reserved word,
//                           you should not use it as a (property) identifier
el.s = function(name){ … }; // notice this defines a /function/,
//                   which you still had to invoke - you can't just use ".s…"
return el;

This is generally considered bad practice, and you won't rejoice in it. Read the article for better patterns.

Btw, style declarations have no setAttribute method as DOM elements have. You can either directly assign to a property, or use the setProperty method.

Also, the s or sty property is a function. You will need to call it before you can access the style declaration object: $m(this).sty().textDecoration = …; "getStyle" might be a more appropriate name.

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