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So I was asked to write a simple vector template and I believe I have written the class correctly, looking at some examples of generalized lists in our textbook (Savitch). Now I am trying to invoke the class in main() by letting the user choose the data type. I am running into problems after I declare the identifier list1. I want to be able to use the same identifier after using an if statement to switch the data type. However, I don't think the syntax in the body of my if statements is correct, since list1 is already declared. In java I always thought after a class was declared you could call its construtor at any time, but I have no idea how to do that in C++.

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

template <class T>
class SimpleVector {
    public:
        SimpleVector();
        SimpleVector(int);
        SimpleVector(const SimpleVector & copy);
        ~SimpleVector();
        int size();
        T getElementAt(int n);
        T & operator[](int index);

    private:
        T * item;
        int length;
};


int main() {


    int dType;
    int dataSize;

    cout << "What type of data do you want to enter?\n(1 for integer, 2 for double and 3 for strings)" << endl;
    cin >> dType;
    cout << "How many data inputs? " << endl;
    cin >> dataSize;

    SimpleVector <int> list1; // if I dont declare then for loop doesn't recognize list as a declared variable.
    if (dType == 0) {
        SimpleVector <int> list1(dataSize);
    }
    else if (dType == 1) {
        SimpleVector <double> list1(dataSize);
    }
    else {
        SimpleVector <string> list1(dataSize);
    }

    cout << "Please enter the data:" << endl;
    for (int i = 0; i < dataSize; i++) {
        cin >> list1[i];
    }



    return 0;
}

template <class T> SimpleVector<T>::SimpleVector() {
    item = NULL;
    length = 0;
}
template <class T> SimpleVector<T>::SimpleVector(int s) {
    length = s;
    item = new T[length];

}

template <class T> SimpleVector<T>::SimpleVector(const SimpleVector & copy) {
    int newSize = copy - > size();
    item = new T[newSize];

    for (int i = 0; i < newSize; i++)
    item[i] = copy.item[i];
}

template <class T> SimpleVector<T>::~SimpleVector() {
    delete[] item;
}

template <class T> int SimpleVector<T>::size() {
    return length;
}

template <class T> T SimpleVector<T>::getElementAt(int n) {
    return *(item + n);
}

template <class T> T & SimpleVector<T>::operator[](int index) {
    return this->item[index];
}
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2 Answers

You cannot switch datatypes. A variable once declared as a particular type cannot be changed to a different type.

variables have scope.

{
    int a;
    .....stuff.....
}
// a cannot be accessed here.

a can now be used only between the open { and close }.

{
    int a; // First a
    .....stuff..... // a refers to the first a here
        {
            int a;
            .....stuff..... // a refers to the second a here
        }
    .....stuff..... // a refers to the first a here
}

The second a is a different variable from the first one. It is accessible only it's scope - i.e. between the open and close braces nearest to it.

If you really want a dynamic type, try Boost.variant or Boost.Any.

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Thanks guys I've gone ahead and split my if statement to just act on the list depending on the data type chosen. (I'm sure generalizing a read data would have been the best way to go, but whatever repetitive code wont hurt me point wise) –  user1871426 Dec 3 '12 at 3:48
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C++, like Java, is a statically typed and statically scoped language. This means that the type and lifetime of variables must be known at compilation time.

In java I always thought after a class is declared you can call its construtor at any time, but I have no idea how to do that in C++.

This is not different from Java. In Java, what you're attempting would be equivalent to doing:

MyClass c;
if (cond) {
   MyClass c = new MyClass(1);
} else  {
   MyClass c = new MyClass(2);
}

This has nothing to do with calling constructors. It has to do with the fact that you're declaring new variables in nested scopes, and they are completely independent of variables of the same name in outer scopes.

If you need runtime polymorphism, then (by definition), you actually need to use polymorphism. That is, you need to create a common base class with virtual functions:

class SimpleVectorBase
{
public:
    SimpleVectorBase() { }
    virtual ~SimpleVectorBase() { }

    virtual int size() const { return length; }

    // ... etc. ...

private:
    int length;
}

template <class T>
class SimpleVector : public SimpleVectorBase {
    // ...
}

int main() {
    // ...

    SimpleVectorBase* list1;
    if (dType == 0) {
        list1 = new SimpleVector<int>(dataSize);
    } else if (dType == 1) {
        list1 = new SimpleVector<double>(dataSize);
    } else {
        list1 = new SimpleVector<string>(dataSize);
    }

    // ...
}

However, doing this won't really help you with your for loop. In your particular case, you probably would be better off templatizing the whole thing:

template<typename T>
void doWork(int dataSize)
{
    SimpleVector<T> list1(dataSize);
    std::cout << "Please enter the data:" << std::endl;
    for (int i = 0; i < dataSize; i++) {
        std::cin >> list1[i];
    }
    // ... Do other stuff with list1 ...
}

and then your main() function would do:

if (dType == 0) {
    doWork<int>(dataSize);
} else if (dType == 1) {
    doWork<double>(dataSize);
} else {
    doWork<string>(dataSize);
}
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I had another question about my 3rd constructor. It is supposed to implement a "deep copy" of the vector parameter. I am trying to simply make a new array with the size of the input parameter array. However the line: template <class T> SimpleVector<T>::SimpleVector(const SimpleVector & copy) { int newSize = copy - > size();//THIS LINE doesn't seem to work correctly –  user1871426 Dec 3 '12 at 3:45
    
Thanks guys I've gone ahead and split my if statement to just act on the list depending on the data type chosen. (I'm sure generalizing a read data would have been the best way to go, but whatever repetitive code wont hurt me point wise) –  user1871426 Dec 3 '12 at 3:50
    
@user1871426: References aren't pointers. You would need to use copy.size(), not copy->size(). (Also, look into using initialization lists for constructors, and "copy" is a misnomer since that argument is what's being copied, not itself a copy.) –  jamesdlin Dec 3 '12 at 3:52
    
I get the following error when I change it to the dot operator: base operand of '->' has non-pointer type 'const SimpleVector<std::basic_string<char> >' –  user1871426 Dec 3 '12 at 3:55
    
Sorry, there was a delay in the error. It actually says "Invalid arguments ' Candidates are:int size()'" –  user1871426 Dec 3 '12 at 3:56
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