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Writing a function to do a head insert on a linked-list. It's half working as in it's inserting the object into head and reattaching the list but I'm losing my original head node in the list somehow.

If list is [green, red, blue] and I try to insert yellow, it will work but the new list will be [yellow, red, blue].

Node class is:

template<class T>
class Node
{
public:
    Node(T theData, Node<T>* theLink) : data(theData), link(theLink){}
    Node<T>* getLink( ) const { return link; }

    const T& getData( ) const { return data; }

    void setData(const T& theData) { data = theData; }
    void setLink(Node<T>* pointer) { link = pointer; }

private:
    T data;
    Node<T> *link;
};

List is stored into a queue, so the head insert is a method of that class. Queue has private variables front and back that point to the corresponding positions of the list.

template<class T>
void Queue<T>::headInsert(T& theData)
{
   Node<T> *temp;
   temp = front->getLink();
   front->setLink(new Node<T>(theData, temp->getLink() ));
   front = front->getLink();
}
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Why bother with getters and setters? Just make them public members. –  Pubby Dec 3 '12 at 3:30
1  
You might want to look at working code for a linked list. –  Jerry Coffin Dec 3 '12 at 3:33
1  
@Pubby: In general I would agree for such a trivial structure. It hurts nothing to have the getter and setters though. But it does add the flexibility of adding validation logic. You can add code in the setter to detect if a cycle would occur. This would be useful in debug builds. –  Mike Bantegui Dec 3 '12 at 3:33

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your problem is in your setLink call:

template<class T>
void Queue<T>::headInsert(T& theData)
{
   Node<T> *temp;
   temp = front->getLink();
   front->setLink(new Node<T>(theData, temp->getLink() )); // Right here
   front = front->getLink();
}

You actually have a number of problems. First off, let's suppose we have the following test list:

front = Red -> Green -> Blue -> NULL

The call temp = front->getLink() yields the following output:

temp = Green -> Blue -> NULL.

The new Node<T>(theData, temp->getLink()) call, where theData = Yellow, then yields:

new Node<T>(theData, temp->getLink()) = Yellow -> Blue -> NULL.

Calling front->setLink(new(...) then gives you:

front = Red -> Yellow -> Blue -> NULL

Lastly, front = front->getLink():

front = Yellow -> Blue -> NULL.

This is not what you want. You simply want to take yellow and pop it on the front of the list:

template<class T>
void Queue<T>::headInsert(T& theData)
{
   front = new Node<T>(theData, front);
}

No need to modify internal pointers. Just point front to be the new node containing your data, with it's next pointer pointing to the old data.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your quick answer but it's still doing the same thing. –  frankV Dec 3 '12 at 3:35
    
@frankV: See my edit. I neglected to see the error on the line right after the one I suggested replacing. –  Mike Bantegui Dec 3 '12 at 3:36
    
should that be Node<T> *next...? –  frankV Dec 3 '12 at 3:38
    
@frankV: Yes, thank you for pointing out the mistake. –  Mike Bantegui Dec 3 '12 at 3:40
    
It's still doing the same thing. –  frankV Dec 3 '12 at 3:43

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