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I have some CUDA code that does some linear algebra to invert a special type of structured matrix. I calculate RMS error using the results of a serialized version of the algorithm. The error grows with problem size to a greater extent that I would expect. Can anyone provide insight as to why this may be the case?

The GPU code is very naive. This is intentional, and I will optimize it very soon - I just wanted a simple baseline kernel that gives the proper results.

 __global__ void levinson_durbin_gpu(TYPE *h0_d, TYPE *h_d, TYPE *v_d, TYPE *x_d, TYPE *y_d, int N) //Naive kernel
{
    int j = threadIdx.x;
    int i;

    __shared__ TYPE hn_1[512]; 
    hn_1[j] = h_d[j];

    for(i=1; i<N; i++)
    {
        if(j < i)
        {
            TYPE hn = h_d[i];
            TYPE yn = y_d[i];

            __syncthreads();

            //Set up temporary arrays, compute inner products
            __shared__ TYPE temp[512]; //Temp for hn_1_J_v
            __shared__ TYPE temp2[512]; //Temp for hn_1_J_x
            __shared__ TYPE temp3[512]; //Temp for hn_1_v

            temp[j] = hn_1[j]*v_d[i-j-1];
            temp2[j] = hn_1[j]*x_d[i-j-1];
            temp3[j] = hn_1[j]*v_d[j];
            __syncthreads();

            //Three reductions at once
            for(unsigned int s=1; s<i; s*=2)
            {
                int index = 2*s*j;
                if((index+s) < i)
                {
                    temp[index] += temp[index+s];
                    temp2[index] += temp2[index+s];
                    temp3[index] += temp3[index+s];
                }
                __syncthreads();
            }

            TYPE hn_1_J_v = temp[0];
            TYPE hn_1_J_x = temp2[0];
            TYPE hn_1_v = temp3[0];

            TYPE alpha_v = (hn - hn_1_J_v)/(h0_d[0] - hn_1_v);
            TYPE alpha_x = (yn - hn_1_J_x)/(h0_d[0] - hn_1_v);

            __shared__ TYPE w_v[512];
            w_v[j] = v_d[j] - alpha_v*v_d[i-j-1];

            __shared__ TYPE w_x[512];
            w_x[j] = x_d[j] - alpha_x*v_d[i-j-1];

            v_d[j] = w_v[j];
            x_d[j] = w_x[j];
            if(j == 0)
            {
                v_d[i] = alpha_v;
                x_d[i] = alpha_x;
            }


        }

        __syncthreads();
    }

}

The identifier TYPE is either float or double depending on how I compile the code. I'm using 1 block with N threads (again, keeping things naive and simple here). With single precision I see the following results:

N=4: RMS Error = 0.0000000027
N=8: RMS Error = 0.0000001127
N=16: RMS Error = 0.0000008832
N=32: RMS Error = 0.0000009233
N=64: RMS Error = 42.0136776452
N=80: RMS Error = 281371.7533760048

I can't tell if this is an error with my algorithm or some sort of precision issue. If it helps I can show the above results using double precision, the CPU version of the algorithm, or the code that calculates the RMS error. I'm using a GeForce GTX 660 Ti (cc 3.0) GPU. The variable x_d contains the end result.

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2  
This probably has nothing at all to do with precision and everything to do with a buffer overflow. It is very hard to guess what might be going wrong without a complete repro case to study, but I would be extremely suspicious of index = 2*s*j. If I am reading the code correctly, for your N=80 example you could have i=79, j=78 which would give s=64 and index = 2*64*78 = 9984 which is a big buffer overflow. Have you confirmed no API errors and tried running the code with cuda-memcheck? –  talonmies Dec 3 '12 at 11:22
    
Thanks for your response @talonmies. I have confirmed that there are no API errors but I have not used cuda-memcheck yet, I'll do that shortly. Just to be clear, why would such a buffer overflow be occurring? Note that I only access the temp arrays when (index+s) < i so in your example I only access temp[0] through temp[79] because N=80. –  Adam27X Dec 3 '12 at 15:06
    
@Adam27X: it seems that the conditional branch 'if(j < i)' is not uniform, while you call syncthreads() inside it. This might lead to unpredicted results –  user1545642 Dec 3 '12 at 15:28
1  
btw I assume this is very likely a synchronization problem in since for N <= 32 (warp size) the algorithm works fine but once you go beyond the warp boundary, the error estimate blows up –  user1545642 Dec 3 '12 at 15:39
    
@asm Sounds reasonable but how would I solve that problem? Loop iteration i+1 depends on the results from loop iteration i so I do need some sort of a barrier there... –  Adam27X Dec 3 '12 at 16:41

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Thanks to the help from the comments section I was able to solve the problem myself, so I'll document it here in case others experience a similar issue.

The problem indeed was synchronization issue - my use of __syncthreads() within a divergent control flow block. The solution was to break that control flow block into multiple parts and calling __syncthreads() after each part:

__global__ void levinson_durbin_gpu(TYPE *h0_d, TYPE *h_d, TYPE *v_d, TYPE *x_d, TYPE *y_d, int N) //Naive kernel
{
    int j = threadIdx.x;
    int i;

    __shared__ TYPE hn_1[512];
    hn_1[j] = h_d[j];
    __syncthreads();

    //Set up temporary arrays
    __shared__ TYPE temp[512]; //Temp for hn_1_J_v
    __shared__ TYPE temp2[512]; //Temp for hn_1_J_x
    __shared__ TYPE temp3[512]; //Temp for hn_1_v

    TYPE hn;
    TYPE yn;

    for(i=1; i<N; i++)
    {
        if(j < i)
        {
            hn = h_d[i];
            yn = y_d[i];

            //Compute inner products
            temp[j] = hn_1[j]*v_d[i-j-1];
            temp2[j] = hn_1[j]*x_d[i-j-1];
            temp3[j] = hn_1[j]*v_d[j];
        }

        __syncthreads();

        //Have all threads complete this section to avoid synchronization issues

        //Three reductions at once
        for(unsigned int s=1; s<i; s*=2)
        {
            int index = 2*s*j;
            if((index+s) < i)
            {
                temp[index] += temp[index+s];
                temp2[index] += temp2[index+s];
                temp3[index] += temp3[index+s];
            }
            __syncthreads();
        }

        if(j < i)
        {
            TYPE hn_1_J_v = temp[0];
            TYPE hn_1_J_x = temp2[0];
            TYPE hn_1_v = temp3[0];

            TYPE alpha_v = (hn - hn_1_J_v)/(h0_d[0] - hn_1_v);
            TYPE alpha_x = (yn - hn_1_J_x)/(h0_d[0] - hn_1_v);

            __shared__ TYPE w_v[512];
            w_v[j] = v_d[j] - alpha_v*v_d[i-j-1];

            __shared__ TYPE w_x[512];
            w_x[j] = x_d[j] - alpha_x*v_d[i-j-1];

            v_d[j] = w_v[j];
            x_d[j] = w_x[j];
            if(j == 0)
            {
                v_d[i] = alpha_v;
                x_d[i] = alpha_x;
            }
        }

    __syncthreads();
}

}

N=32: RMS Error = 0.0000009233
N=64: RMS Error = 0.0000027644
N=128: RMS Error = 0.0000058276
N=256: RMS Error = 0.0000117755
N=512: RMS Error = 0.0000237040

what I learned: When you use synchronization mechanisms in CUDA, make sure all threads reach the same barrier point! I feel as though this sort of thing should produce a compiler warning.

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