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What is the fastest way to extract the min from each column in a matrix?


EDIT:

Moved all the benchmarks to the answer below.

Using a Tall, Short or Wide Matrix:

  ##  TEST DATA
  set.seed(1)
  matrix.inputs <- list(
        "Square Matrix"     = matrix(sample(seq(1e6), 4^2*1e4, T), ncol=400),   #  400 x  400
        "Tall Matrix"       = matrix(sample(seq(1e6), 4^2*1e4, T), nrow=4000),  # 4000 x   40
        "Wide-short Matrix" = matrix(sample(seq(1e6), 4^2*1e4, T), ncol=4000),  #   40 x 4000
        "Wide-tall Matrix"  = matrix(sample(seq(1e6), 4^2*1e5, T), ncol=4000),   #  400 x 4000
        "Tiny Sq Matrix"    = matrix(sample(seq(1e6), 4^2*1e2, T), ncol=40)     #   40 x   40
  )
share|improve this question
    
Benchmarks always get my +1. –  Roman Luštrik Dec 3 '12 at 9:49
    
I think you should post this stuff as an answer, rather than as part of your question (I'd vote for it!) –  Ben Bolker Dec 4 '12 at 21:14
    
@BenBolker, done. –  Ricardo Saporta Dec 4 '12 at 21:30

6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Here is one that is faster on square and wide matrices. It uses pmin on the rows of the matrix. (If you know a faster way of splitting the matrix into its rows, please feel free to edit)

do.call(pmin, lapply(1:nrow(mat), function(i)mat[i,]))

Using the same benchmark as @RicardoSaporta:

$`Square Matrix`
          test elapsed relative
3 pmin.on.rows   1.370    1.000
1          apl   1.455    1.062
2         cmin   2.075    1.515

$`Wide Matrix`
      test elapsed relative
3 pmin.on.rows   0.926    1.000
2         cmin   2.302    2.486
1          apl   5.058    5.462

$`Tall Matrix`
          test elapsed relative
1          apl   1.175    1.000
2         cmin   2.126    1.809
3 pmin.on.rows   5.813    4.947
share|improve this answer
1  
P.S.: I think you can even replace pmin with its 'internal' version pmin.int to get more speed out of it. –  flodel Dec 3 '12 at 12:19
    
thanks a lot! pmin is exactly the function I was originally looking for. I knew such a function had to exist, but couldnt find it. well, almost exactly -- exactly pmin with the do.call..lapply built into it ;) –  Ricardo Saporta Dec 3 '12 at 16:38

The sos package is great for answering these sorts of questions.

library("sos")
findFn("colMins")
library("matrixStats")
?colMins

http://finzi.psych.upenn.edu/R/library/matrixStats/html/rowRanges.html

Oddly enough, for the one example I tried colMins was slower. Perhaps someone can point out what's funny about my example?

set.seed(101); z <- matrix(runif(1e6),nrow=1000)
library(rbenchmark)
benchmark(colMins(z),apply(z,2,min))
##               test replications elapsed relative user.self sys.self
## 2 apply(z, 2, min)          100  14.290     1.00     7.216    7.057
## 1       colMins(z)          100  25.585     1.79    15.509    9.852
share|improve this answer
    
Two great answers in one!! Thank you Ben –  Ricardo Saporta Dec 3 '12 at 3:54
2  
... interesting. I had a matrix with 5K+ columns, but only 10 rows. When I instead tried a 5k+ rows, apply is now faster –  Ricardo Saporta Dec 3 '12 at 4:00
lapply( split(mat, rep(1:dim(mat)[1], each=dim(mat)[2])), min)

which( ! apply(my.mat, 2, min, na.rm=T) ==
        sapply( split(my.mat, rep(1:dim(my.mat)[1], each=dim(my.mat)[2])), min) )
# named integer(0)
share|improve this answer
    
I see no reason why they would not be ordered in the same manner as would occur by column and my tests with smaller "ordering correctly" and provide a counter-example. –  BondedDust Dec 3 '12 at 5:02

Below is a collection of the answers thus far. This will be updated as more answers are contributed.

BENCHMARKS

  library(rbenchmark)
  library(matrixStats)  # for colMins


  list.of.tests <- list (
        ## Method 1: apply()  [original]
        apl =expression(apply(mat, 2, min, na.rm=T)),

        ## Method 2:  matrixStats::colMins [contributed by @Ben Bolker ]
        cmin = expression(colMins(mat)),

        ## Method 3: lapply() + split()  [contributed by @DWin ]
        lapl = expression(lapply( split(mat, rep(1:dim(mat)[1], each=dim(mat)[2])), min)),

        ## Method 4: pmin() / pmin.int()  [contributed by @flodel ]
        pmn = expression(do.call(pmin, lapply(1:nrow(mat), function(i)mat[i,]))),
        pmn.int = expression(do.call(pmin.int, lapply(1:nrow(mat), function(i)mat[i,]))) #,

        ## Method 5: ????
        #  e5 = expression(  ???  ),
        )  


  (times <- 
        lapply(matrix.inputs, function(mat)
            do.call(benchmark, args=c(list.of.tests, replications=500, order="relative"))[, c("test", "elapsed", "relative")]
  ))



  ############################# 
  #$         RESULTS         $#
  #$_________________________$#
  #############################

  # $`Square Matrix`
  #      test elapsed relative
  # 5 pmn.int   2.842    1.000
  # 4     pmn   3.622    1.274
  # 1     apl   3.670    1.291
  # 2    cmin   5.826    2.050
  # 3    lapl  41.817   14.714  

  # $`Tall Matrix`
  #      test elapsed relative
  # 1     apl   2.622    1.000
  # 2    cmin   5.561    2.121
  # 5 pmn.int  11.264    4.296
  # 4     pmn  18.142    6.919
  # 3    lapl  48.637   18.550  

  # $`Wide-short Matrix`
  #      test elapsed relative
  # 5 pmn.int   2.909    1.000
  # 4     pmn   3.018    1.037
  # 2    cmin   6.361    2.187
  # 1     apl  15.765    5.419
  # 3    lapl  41.479   14.259  

  # $`Wide-tall Matrix`
  #      test elapsed relative
  # 5 pmn.int  20.917    1.000
  # 4     pmn  26.188    1.252
  # 1     apl  38.635    1.847
  # 2    cmin  64.557    3.086
  # 3    lapl 434.761   20.785  

  # $`Tiny Sq Matrix`
  #      test elapsed relative
  # 5 pmn.int   0.112    1.000
  # 2    cmin   0.149    1.330
  # 4     pmn   0.174    1.554
  # 1     apl   0.180    1.607
  # 3    lapl   0.509    4.545
share|improve this answer

FYI, since matrixStats v0.8.7 (2013-07-28), colMins() is roughly twice as fast as before. The reason is that the function previously utilized colRanges(), which explains the "surprisingly slow" results reported here. Same speed is seen for colMaxs(), rowMins() and rowMaxs().

share|improve this answer

mat[(1:ncol(mat)-1)*nrow(mat)+max.col(t(-mat))] seems pretty fast, and it's base R.

share|improve this answer
    
Benchmark it for points. –  c.gutierrez Jul 10 at 15:57

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