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What is the difference between the KeyDown and KeyPress events in .NET?

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I am also have this Doubt. Thanks for Asking +1 –  Sagotharan Aug 2 '11 at 8:09
    
This should be protected. –  rafaelcastrocouto May 27 at 14:13

8 Answers 8

up vote 102 down vote accepted

There is apparently a lot of misunderstanding about this!

The only practical difference between KeyDown and KeyPress is that KeyPress relays the character resulting from a keypress, and is only called if there is one.

In other words, if you press A on your keyboard, you'll get this sequence of events:

  1. KeyDown: KeyCode=Keys.A, KeyData=Keys.A, Modifiers=Keys.None
  2. KeyPress: KeyChar='a'
  3. KeyUp: KeyCode=Keys.A

But if you press Shift+A, you'll get:

  1. KeyDown: KeyCode=Keys.ShiftKey, KeyData=Keys.ShiftKey, Shift, Modifiers=Keys.Shift
  2. KeyDown: KeyCode=Keys.A, KeyData=Keys.A | Keys.Shift, Modifiers=Keys.Shift
  3. KeyPress: KeyChar='A'
  4. KeyUp: KeyCode=Keys.A
  5. KeyUp: KeyCode=Keys.ShiftKey

If you hold down the keys for a while, you'll get something like:

  1. KeyDown: KeyCode=Keys.ShiftKey, KeyData=Keys.ShiftKey, Shift, Modifiers=Keys.Shift
  2. KeyDown: KeyCode=Keys.ShiftKey, KeyData=Keys.ShiftKey, Shift, Modifiers=Keys.Shift
  3. KeyDown: KeyCode=Keys.ShiftKey, KeyData=Keys.ShiftKey, Shift, Modifiers=Keys.Shift
  4. KeyDown: KeyCode=Keys.ShiftKey, KeyData=Keys.ShiftKey, Shift, Modifiers=Keys.Shift
  5. KeyDown: KeyCode=Keys.ShiftKey, KeyData=Keys.ShiftKey, Shift, Modifiers=Keys.Shift
  6. KeyDown: KeyCode=Keys.A, KeyData=Keys.A | Keys.Shift, Modifiers=Keys.Shift
  7. KeyPress: KeyChar='A'
  8. KeyDown: KeyCode=Keys.A, KeyData=Keys.A | Keys.Shift, Modifiers=Keys.Shift
  9. KeyPress: KeyChar='A'
  10. KeyDown: KeyCode=Keys.A, KeyData=Keys.A | Keys.Shift, Modifiers=Keys.Shift
  11. KeyPress: KeyChar='A'
  12. KeyDown: KeyCode=Keys.A, KeyData=Keys.A | Keys.Shift, Modifiers=Keys.Shift
  13. KeyPress: KeyChar='A'
  14. KeyDown: KeyCode=Keys.A, KeyData=Keys.A | Keys.Shift, Modifiers=Keys.Shift
  15. KeyPress: KeyChar='A'
  16. KeyUp: KeyCode=Keys.A
  17. KeyUp: KeyCode=Keys.ShiftKey

Notice that KeyPress occurs in between KeyDown and KeyUp, not after KeyUp, as many of the other answers have stated, that KeyPress is not called when a character isn't generated, and that KeyDown is repeated while the key is held down, also contrary to many of the other answers.

Examples of keys that do not directly result in calls to KeyPress:

  • Shift, Ctrl, Alt
  • F1 through F12
  • Arrow keys

Examples of keys that do result in calls to KeyPress:

  • A through Z, 0 through 9, etc.
  • Spacebar
  • Tab (KeyChar='\t', ASCII 9)
  • Enter (KeyChar='\r', ASCII 13)
  • Esc (KeyChar='\x1b', ASCII 27)
  • Backspace (KeyChar='\b', ASCII 8)

For the curious, KeyDown roughly correlates to WM_KEYDOWN, KeyPress to WM_CHAR, and KeyUp to WM_KEYUP. WM_KEYDOWN can be called fewer than the the number of key repeats, but it sends a repeat count, which, IIRC, WinForms uses to generate exactly one KeyDown per repeat.

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Wonder Answer. +1 –  Sagotharan Aug 2 '11 at 8:14
2  
Thumbs Up for this excellent explanation! +1 –  Andz Jun 2 '12 at 17:13
    
Excellent explanation, thx, one caveat though, Escape does not trigger KeyPress on Chrome (not sure about the others). –  Barnabas Szabolcs Apr 29 '13 at 16:54
    
Excellent explanation, thx, +1, one caveat though, Escape does not trigger KeyPress on Chrome (not sure about the others). –  Barnabas Szabolcs Apr 29 '13 at 16:54
1  
@BarnabasSzabolcs: Chrome runs .NET? –  P Daddy Apr 30 '13 at 23:33

The KeyPress event is not raised by noncharacter keys; however, the noncharacter keys do raise the KeyDown and KeyUp events.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.windows.forms.control.keypress.aspx

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12  
Most of the other answers are wrong in one way or another, but this one comes closest to the reality. KeyPress is raised only for character keys and it obeys the setting of keyboard typing delays/repeating. The actual sequence of events is: 1) KeyDown 2) for character key KeyPress one or more times (depending on the system settings and how long the key is held) 3) KeyUp –  Filip Navara Sep 2 '09 at 13:42
    
I don't have the rep to do it, but could someone bust a wiki and combine the content of the above comment and the accepted answer? –  Josh Kodroff Sep 2 '09 at 13:46
11  
Filip Navara's comment isn't entirely correct. If a key is held down, you'll get KeyDown, KeyPress, KeyDown, KeyPress, KeyDown, KeyPress KeyUp. KeyDown is called for every repeat. –  P Daddy Sep 2 '09 at 13:55
    
You are right. Thanks for correcting me. –  Filip Navara Sep 2 '09 at 14:12

KeyPress is only fired by printable characters and is fired after the KeyDown event. Depending on the typing delay settings there can be multiple KeyDown and KeyPress events but only one KeyUp event.

KeyDown
KeyPress
KeyUp

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You're close, but off about the sequence. –  P Daddy Sep 2 '09 at 13:48
    
@P Daddy - I've corrected it, should have double checked before going from memory. –  Stevo3000 Sep 2 '09 at 14:07
    
@Stevo3000, fyi: non-printable unicode characters will also fire KeyPress events. I have an app that reads data inserted by a barcode reader into a textbox and the reader includes non-printable unicode characters. –  jlafay Feb 7 '13 at 18:35
    
@jlafay - Not according to MSDN The KeyPress event is not raised by noncharacter keys; however, the noncharacter keys do raise the KeyDown and KeyUp events. –  Stevo3000 Feb 11 '13 at 8:09
    
@Stevo3000, I'm not sure how the barcode scanner inputs text into a textbox but the KeyPress fires for special characters that it sends. The value starts with a non-printable character and terminates with a non-printable character. So I'm not sure how it's firing if that's true. Maybe I'll take a look at the .Net assembly that contains the events with IL Spy to get a better look at what is actually detected. –  jlafay Feb 11 '13 at 13:53

From MSDN:

Key events occur in the following order:

  1. KeyDown

  2. KeyPress

  3. KeyUp

Furthermore, KeyPress gives you a chance to declare the action as "handled" to prevent it from doing anything.

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FYI, KeyDown and KeyUp also have a Handled property that you may set so that isn't a between KeyPress and the other key events. –  jlafay Feb 7 '13 at 18:39

KeyPress is a higher level of abstraction than KeyDown (and KeyUp). KeyDown and KeyUp are hardware related: the actual action of a key on the keyboard. KeyPress is more "I received a character from the keyboard".

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I've always thought keydown happened as soon as you press the key down, keypress is the action of pressing the key and releasing it.

i found this which gives a little different explaination: http://bytes.com/topic/net/answers/649131-difference-keypress-keydown-event

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Keydown is pressing the key without releasing it, Keypress is a complete press-and-release cycle.

Put another way, KeyDown + KeyUp = Keypress

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according to MSDN, the event sequence is KeyDown, KeyPress, KeyUp (msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/…) –  Nathan Koop Sep 2 '09 at 13:35
    
Thanks for the clarification Nathan –  Rob Cowell Sep 2 '09 at 13:38
    
@RobCowell Also, as jlafay pointed out KeyPress isnt at all dependant on KeyDown or KeyUp. –  PsychoData Mar 7 at 22:31

Easiest explanation:

I held down the 'd' key for a second and then released.

dddddd

the keydown event happened once before the first d appeared on the screen, the keypress event happened 6 times and the keyup event happened after the last d appeared on the screen.

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This is incorrect. KeyDown is called for every key repeat. –  P Daddy Sep 2 '09 at 13:51
    
damn, misread the question and got it into my head he meant javascript –  Stephen Lacy Sep 2 '09 at 14:03

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