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So. I'm trying to do some network stuff on Android. Inside my Async task, I'm doing:

InputStream streamOfDestiny = null;

try{
    // do some network stuff here...
}
finally{
    if(streamOfDestiny != null){
        streamOfDestiny.close(); // Build error here. Apparently, closing a stream can cause an IOException. Why this is the case, I do not know. But it is. And, since this is Java, I apparently need to care.
    }
}

So now I've got this IOException fouling everything up. I could do something like this:

InputStream streamOfDestiny = null;

try{
    // do some network stuff here...
}
finally{
    if(streamOfDestiny != null){
        try{
            streamOfDestiny.close();
        }
        catch(IOException e){
            // Hey look! I'm inside a catch block, inside a finally block!
        }
    }
}

But that just looks terrible. A try/catch block inside a finally block? How ugly! I could well leave it unclosed, but that seems like bad practice to me, and just feels wrong (I started the stream, I want to finish it). I could do this:

IOUtils.closeQuietly(streamOfDestiny);

But now I have to find org.apache.commons.io.IOUtils and somehow include that into my package. Too much work, plus increases my package size for something that I only need one function out of. Lame.

I could always write my own version of closeQuietly:

public static void closeStreamQuietly(InputStream streamToClose){
    try{
        streamToClose.close();
    }
    catch (IOException e){
        // ignore it....
    }
}

but that just seems like I'm re-inventing the wheel, which is almost always bad news - it feels like there ought to be some nice, elegant way of doing this that I'm completely missing here.

Any ideas folks?

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3 Answers 3

I am not sure why are you terming your option-2 (try-catch block inside finally) or option-4 (creating a little util method) as ugly or extra work. This is normal and expected.

If you are writing any code inside finally then related exception handling should be done and this is the case here.

One exception handling you have already done(preventive) by putting a null check otherwise it could throw NullPointerException when streamOfDestiny is null.

Second exception handling is required to handle the exception scenarios of Stream closing, which could arise with the reasons such as Stream is not open, unavailable or it's not able to release the underline resources or scenarios like this etc.

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I don't know - perhaps it's me, but a finally block signifies code that should ALWAYS be executed, and a try block is code which specifically deals with an exception, causing code NOT to be executed. I realize that doesn't quite apply in this case, but I still don't like it. Option 4 is not horrible, but I'm just expecting the framework to have handled this somewhere...again, it feels like re-inventing the wheel? I know most of this post is subjective - and perhaps overly stylistic...but, hey, I'm just trying to see if I missed something here. –  mschultz Dec 3 '12 at 5:18
    
@user1864042 It's is not reinventing the wheel. Finally block is meant to execute the piece of code which you think should run even if some exception occurs. It doesn't mean that you can put any code in the finally and Java will handle the expected exceptions on its own. In plain words, finally block and exception handling are two different concepts. Don't mix them. If you are writing some code in the finally block, related exception handling should be done explicitly. Whether you do that inside the block, write your custom method, use some framework or declare as throws etc. it's up to you. –  Yogendra Singh Dec 3 '12 at 5:25
    
@Yogndra - I see your point....I suppose it all comes down to the fact that I still don't see why close should be throwing exceptions - and that I think the framework should provide a method to close a IO stream WITHOUT throwing anything, a method that implements the logic "I have this IOStream object here. I no longer wish to use it. Please close it, make it stop doing whatever it was doing, release whatever resources (connections, etc) it was using, and then let me go on my merry way". –  mschultz Dec 3 '12 at 5:31
    
@user1864042: Raise an issue on Oracle site :) This is a generic method. Choice in exception scenario could be specific for different programs e.g. what if you want to re-attempt to close it as it may remain open, what if you decide not to proceed further since stream couldn't be closed.. there could be different requirements in different scenarios and hence no generic handling done for this.If in your specific application, you think its should be silently closed(ignore), write a small util method for the same. Exception handling is all about handling such scenario as per the need of your app. –  Yogendra Singh Dec 3 '12 at 5:38

Copy IOUtils code directly from the web:

http://grepcode.com/file/repo1.maven.org/maven2/commons-io/commons-io/1.4/org/apache/commons/io/IOUtils.java#IOUtils.closeQuietly%28java.io.InputStream%29

Also, get used to exception handling inside your finally blocks. This will not be the last time you see it.

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There's no mystery. close() calls flush() in most implementations (see the Javadoc for FilterOutputStream), and flush() can throw IOException, as it may perform I/O. Other possibilities are conceivable.

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