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I was wondering what the rule of thumb for new and delete is. I always thought that every time I call new, I should have a delete.

In the case below, if I include the destructor however, I get a bad excess error. If I don't include the destructor, my code works fine.

struct Foo
 {
     Foo(int A, int B)
     {
          bar = new std::vector< std::vector < int > >(A, std::vector<int>(B,2);
          //creates a vector of A vectors where each nested vector contains the number 2 B times. 
     }

     ~Foo() //Get bad access error if destructor included in code. 
     {
          delete[] bar;
     }     

     std::vector< std::vector < int > > *bar;
 };

int main()
{
    Foo X;

    return 0;
}
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7  
You're using delete[] but there isn't an array. Why are you using new with a vector anyway? –  Rapptz Dec 3 '12 at 5:11
    
go through this link parashift.com/c%2B%2B-faq-lite/freestore-mgmt.html –  Ravindra Bagale Dec 3 '12 at 5:14
1  
And you also need to define a copy constructor to make sure that copies have their own memory to subsequently delete. –  Keith Dec 3 '12 at 5:15
    
Hi @Rapptz, in my code, bar is a vector of vector of object MyObj with a non-trivial constructor. So I thought that to initialize it, I would need something like bar = new std::vector< std::vector < MyObj > >(A, std::vector< MyObj >(B, MyObj(int a, int b) ); sorry, I should of made this more clear. –  namu Dec 3 '12 at 5:15
1  
@Keith, Don't forget a copy assignment operator. –  chris Dec 3 '12 at 5:16
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3 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

It should be delete bar; not delete [] bar;

Add another rule to your list of rules.

The delete line should have a [] only if the new line has a [some number]

In your case the new line does not have a [some number]

 bar = new std::vector< std::vector < int > >(A, std::vector<int>(B,2);

So your delete line also should not have one.

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I'd like to clarify, since when you look at it the right way, the answer could suggest that delete does the job in both cases (not that I'm saying you intended it to), that all news should only be matched with deletes, and all new[]s should only be matched with delete[]s. –  chris Dec 3 '12 at 5:15
    
The rule you cite is overly simplistic, and it's easy to find cases where it doesn't apply. (Think of typedefs. A allocating a pointer to a function.) The real rule is to determine exactly the type you are allocating, and if it is an array, use std::vector, rather than new[]. –  James Kanze Dec 3 '12 at 9:28
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The above class might be better written as:

struct Foo   
 {
     Foo(int A, int B)
       :  bar(A, std::vector<int>(B,2)) //creates a vector of A vectors where each nested vector contains the number 2 B times. 
     {}
     // Default copy
     // Default destructor.

     std::vector< std::vector < int > > bar;
 };

This avoids explicit new and delete; often the best rule of thumb for using them correctly!

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With unmanaged code like c++ the rule of thumb is whatever is required by your design.

In general, it's a good idea to clean up your objects to avoid memory leaks, but you could have a situation where you want to keep something in memory.

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