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I must have tried 20 ways of doing this by now. I really need help, no matter what I do i get a error similar to this one.

a value of type "int" cannot be used to initialize an entity of type "int (*)[30]"

i.e. this will get me such an error

int(*array)[160] = malloc((sizeof *array) * 10);

and doing something like this

int** Make2DintArray(int arraySizeX, int arraySizeY) {
    int** theArray;
    theArray = (int**) malloc(arraySizeX*sizeof(int*));
    int i;
    for (i = 0; i < arraySizeX; i++)
    {
        theArray[i] = (int*) malloc(arraySizeY*sizeof(int));
    }
    return theArray;
}

will get me this

"void *(size_t)" in "memory.c" at line 239 and: "int()" 

does anyone have a solution for how to successful allocate a 2dArray of int[160][10]

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The same question like this stackoverflow.com/questions/1970698/… –  bhuang3 Dec 3 '12 at 5:26
    
Yeah but I was having a different problem, which @WhozCraig caught for me. –  WIllJBD Dec 3 '12 at 5:29
    
possible duplicate of Do I cast the result of malloc? –  Jens Gustedt Dec 3 '12 at 8:50
    
Please listen to your compiler, he told you what your error was. For your real question on how to define 2D arrays: don't do emulations of 2d arrays by pointers to pointers. A big matrix in modern C can e.g be simply allocated by double (*array)[n] = malloc(sizeof(double[n][m])); –  Jens Gustedt Dec 3 '12 at 8:53
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6 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Both of these compile fine for me. The first error is common when you forget to #include <stdlib.h> prior to any malloc() call. (which I did not forget to do, btw).

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this may be it, indeed I did not #include <stdlib.h> –  WIllJBD Dec 3 '12 at 5:26
4  
@WIllJBD The second is more important. Never cast a malloc when compiling C. It isn't needed and hides this error, which can be dreadful when compiling on a platform where int is a different size than a pointer. –  WhozCraig Dec 3 '12 at 5:27
    
And that was it, both now compile fine. Thanks! –  WIllJBD Dec 3 '12 at 5:27
    
@WIllJBD glad you found it. –  WhozCraig Dec 3 '12 at 5:28
    
The inexplicable down vote. Go figure. –  WhozCraig Jul 23 '13 at 18:17
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Try this:

int **array;
array = malloc(rows * sizeof(int *));
for (i = 0; i < rows; i++)
  array[i] = malloc(cols * sizeof(int));

// Some testing
for (i = 0; i < rows; i++) {
  for (j = 0; j < cols; j++)
    array[i][j] = 0; // or whatever you want
}

for (i = 0; i < rows; i++) {
  for (j = 0; j < cols; j++)
    printf("%d ", array[i][j]);
}

In your case rows = 160 and cols = 10. Is one possible solution.

With this approach you can use the two indexes:

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1  
Shouldn’t line 2 be sizeof(int*)? –  minitech Jul 23 '13 at 19:22
    
You are right! A typing error. I think it worked in this case because sizeof(int) == sizeof(int *)(in my PC). –  rendon Jul 23 '13 at 22:20
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To allocate the array:

int *array = malloc(sizeof(int) * 160 * 10);

Then use code like:

array[10 * row + column] = value;

(Where row goes from 0 to 159 inclusive and column goes from 0 to 9 inclusive.)

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I have a note for rendon's answer:

For his code, Visual C++ says for every "=" operations: error C2440: '=' : cannot convert from 'void *' to 'int **'

By making some changes, it works for me, but I'm not sure that it does the same, so I afraid of editing his code. Instead, here's me code, that seems to work for a first impression.

int **a;    

a = (int **)malloc(rows * sizeof(int));

for (i = 0; i < rows; i++)
{
    a[i] = (int *)malloc(cols * sizeof(int));
}

for (j=0;j<rows;j++)
{
    for (i=0;i<cols;i++)
    {
        a[i][j] = 2;
    }
}

Actually, I did it with a custom struct instead of ints but I think either way should it work.

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1  
Are you using C++? This works in C; in C++, you should use new[] instead. –  minitech Jul 23 '13 at 19:23
    
Yes, I use C++. Thanks. –  Zoltán Schmidt Jul 23 '13 at 21:09
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Don't mind me I'm just adding an example using calloc

void allocate_fudging_array(int R, int C)
{
    int **fudging_array = (int **) calloc(R, sizeof(int *));
    for(int k = 0; k < R; k++)
    {
        fudging_array[k] = (int*) calloc(C, sizeof(int));
    }
}


// a helper function to print the array 
void print2darr(int **arr, int R, int C)
{
    for(int i = 0; i < R; i++)
    {
        for(int j = 0; j < C; j++)
        {
            printf(" %d  ", arr[i][j]);
        }
        printf("\n");
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
will the subsequent calloc be contiguous to do the pointer arithmetic ? In case of multi threading, won't there be a possibility of losing contiguous memory to other thread, if other thread also does a malloc/calloc ? –  sena Dec 5 '13 at 18:52
    
See : stackoverflow.com/a/855780/68805 –  Reno Dec 8 '13 at 8:32
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2D array to store char * (haven't tested the code)

char ***array;
int rows = 2, cols = 2, i, j;
array = malloc(sizeof(char **)*rows);
for (i = 0; i < rows; i++)
  array[i] = malloc(cols * sizeof(char *));

array[0][0] = "asd";
array[0][1] = "qwe";
array[1][0] = "stack";
array[1][1] = "overflow";

for(i=0;i<rows;i++){
  for(j=0;j<cols;j++){
    printf("%s ",array[rows][cols]);
  }
  printf("\n");
}
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