Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The base class user should access the original method

class A
 public init()

The derived class user should aceess ONLY the derived method.

class B
 public init(int info)

I cannot use "override" bc there's a different signature. What options do I have so that the derived class user does not see two methods.

Notes. All in all I just need two classes that share some code. Inheritance is not a must. But simplicity for the user of B is a priority.

share|improve this question
5  
I think you are doing something wrong structurally, give us the details of what you would like to do. –  Ali Ersöz Sep 2 '09 at 13:53
1  
Virtual/Override implies calling the methods the same way. what do you imagine the call would look like? –  Henk Holterman Sep 2 '09 at 14:16

8 Answers 8

This is a big code smell (and violates some basic OOP tenets) and, to the best of my knowledge, can not be done in any language. In OOP, an instance of B is an instance of A; this is polymorphism. So if A has a public method named init accepting no parameters, then so does B.

What are you trying to do this for?

Edit: Now that you've added the edit that states that inheritance is not a must, just use composition to share code. Give B a private instance of A, for example.

share|improve this answer
    
but base class user should access to it. –  Ali Ersöz Sep 2 '09 at 13:49
    
@yapiskan: Thanks, I overlooked his implicit statement that A.init be public. –  Jason Sep 2 '09 at 13:59
    
Nope, it can be done in C++, and it doesn't violate anything. –  Daniel Earwicker Sep 2 '09 at 14:32
    
@Earwicker: how? in c++ you can only overload function, not override. –  Yossarian Sep 2 '09 at 15:30
    
@Yossarian - private inheritance. –  Daniel Earwicker Sep 2 '09 at 18:47

According to the Liskov principle you simply cannot do that, because it would violate this principle. The best thing you can to is override init() in the derived class and make it throw an exception every time it's invoked, stating that the user should use init(int info) and rely on the test to catch the errors.

Why you can't simple replace the init() method or even make it protected?

The Liskov principle states (rephrased) that where an instance of class A is required, an isntance of class B extends A can be passed. If a method expects A and wants to call init() on it and you pass B (which extends A) to it with a protected init() the method will fail. This is the reason why the code will not even compile.

share|improve this answer
    
It isn't necessarily covered by the Liskov principle. Where a language supports private inheritance, it has several options. If D privately inherits B, then it could be that D is not a B (in other words, they are not related types - D just inherits implementation), and so Liskov is irrelevant. Or it could be that D is assignable to a B reference/pointer and then it fully is a B, and so Liskov is observed just fine. On the other hand, your suggestion to throw an exception in the derived class would very much violate Liskov. –  Daniel Earwicker Sep 2 '09 at 18:37
    
private inheritance is stupid –  MedicineMan Sep 2 '09 at 21:09
    
Earwicker: agree - throwing an exception violates the principle. In OO languages inheritance usually is 'is a' relation, but technically, you are right. –  Emil Ivanov Sep 4 '09 at 14:30

What you're asking for is impossible, due to the nature of the type system. Any instance of B can be thought of as an A, so you can call any of A's methods (including Init()). The best you can do is overload Init() in B and throw an exception to catch this at runtime.

public class B
{
     void Init()
     {
         throw new NotSupportedException();
     }
}
share|improve this answer
2  
I'd say that's just about the worst thing you could do! :) Why not pick a solution that catches problems during compilation? –  Daniel Earwicker Sep 2 '09 at 14:38

Presumabely A and B have something in common. Can you factor that out into a different base class?

public class Base
{
    ... common stuff ...
}
public class A : Base
{
    public void Init()
    {
    }
}
public class B : Base
{
    public void Init(int info)
    {
    }
}

if you need polymorphism then references to Base or, better yet, Thomas' interface are the way to go.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes. Common code should go in a common base class. –  user89010 Sep 2 '09 at 15:13

Instead of inheritance, use an interface as a "middle man":

public interface IAllThatYouNeed
{
    public void DoSomeStuff();
}

public class A : IAllThatYouNeed
{
    public void Init() {
        // do stuff
    }
}

public class B : IAllThatYouNeed
{
    public void Init(int info) {
        // do stuff
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I like your solution as well as that of Mathieu which suggests composition instead of inheritance (ie. B instantiate A) –  user89010 Sep 2 '09 at 14:24

it looks like it's not yet possible

i tried to do something like this:

public class B : A
{
    private override void Init() { }

    public void Init(int x)
    { }
}

but Init() it's still visible from the A class

share|improve this answer
    
I tried that too. It happens so because the private override does override, but then it's private, so when looked from exterior it is not found and init() routes to the base class –  user89010 Sep 2 '09 at 15:16

Contrary to some answers/comments here, what you are asking for would have a real use if it existed:

class Derived : Base
{

This can be seen by considering the workaround:

class Derived
{
    private Base _base = new Base();

In other words, it's not really a base class at all, but a hidden part of the implementation.

The downside with this workaround is: what Base has an abstract method that you have to supply? You have to write this:

class Derived
{
    class ActualDerived : Base
    {
        // override abstract method(s)
    }

    private Base _base = new ActualDerived();

This is the whole point of private inheritance (as found in C++) - it's for situations when you want to inherit the implementation but not the "interface" (in the informal sense).

But in C#, it's not available.

share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't give you polymorphism though. That is, sure, what he's looking for can be accomplished but in a way that violates his requirement that B derives from A. –  Jason Sep 2 '09 at 14:41
    
@Jason - Wrong - the OP says "Inheritance is not a must." –  Daniel Earwicker Sep 2 '09 at 14:54
    
And you've updated your answer to say the same as this one now! Strange. –  Daniel Earwicker Sep 2 '09 at 14:55
    
@Earwicker: His statement that "[i]nheritance is not a must" is an edit that came after I made my initial post. –  Jason Sep 2 '09 at 14:59

There is no perfect solution here. Some possible ways to do it:

An approach would be to make A.Init() virtual, override it in B and make it throw a NotImplementedException/InvalidOperationException.

Init() stays visible, but the user finds out very quickly that it is not to be used (make it explicit that Init(int info) is to be used in the XML documentation and in the message of the exception).

If you don't care about the inheritance part and just want to use the functionalities of class A in class B, don't have B deriving from A and make B instantiate A and use its functionalities.

Edit: You can use an interface implementing the common operations in order to retain inheritance while avoiding to implement Init() in B:

public interface IOperations
{
    void DoStuff();
    void Foo();
}

public class A : IOperations
{
    public void Init()
    {
        // Do class A init stuff
    }

    #region IOperations Members

    public void DoStuff()
    {
        // ...
    }

    public void Foo()
    {
        // ...
    }

    #endregion
}

public class B : IOperations
{
    A _operations = new A();

    public void Init(int initData)
    {
        _operations.Init();
        // Do class B init stuff
    }

    #region IOperations Members

    public void DoStuff()
    {
        _operations.DoStuff();
    }

    public void Foo()
    {
        _operations.Foo();
    }

    #endregion
}

This can be made even better by using a factory:

public static class OperationsFactory
{
    public static IOperations CreateOperations()
    {
        A result = new A();
        result.Init();

        return result;
    }

    public static IOperations CreateOperations(int initData)
    {
        B result = new B();
        result.Init(initData);

        return result;
    }
}

This way instantiation code is well encapsulated, the difference between the two Init() methods is hidden from the user code.

share|improve this answer
    
Having B instantiate A seems to me the best solution so far –  user89010 Sep 2 '09 at 14:21

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.