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Ok so I looked at quite a few similar questions, but I'm still a little confused.

So I have multiple test cases set up using assertions, and I'm trying to write a program that using the input of the test case and outputs using if-else statements and recursion. I keep getting a parse error on my if statements.

not the actual code just an example of what I'm trying to do

My question is how do I set up a program to call "tests" properly?

So I have a integer "n" given by my first test case tl1, I want to check if n is even if it is then multiply it by 2 if it's odd then multiply it by 3 and assign the new value to n

So this is the part I'm trying to write in order to accept the input of a test case similar to test case code given.

tests :: if (mod n 2) = 0
         then tests (n * 2)
         else tests (n * 3)   

tests = 
        testlist [
                   tl1
                  ,tl2
                  ,tl3
                 ]
share|improve this question
4  
Your example isn't very useful. This isn't valid Haskell (unless there's yet another extension that somehow makes this valid), and I can't really infer what you were trying to do. – Cubic Dec 3 '12 at 6:48
    
let f n = 2 * n + (if even n then 0 else n) in foldl (flip (f .)) 0 – melpomene Dec 3 '12 at 7:00
    
@Watts I updated my answer with an explanation, in case that's helpful. – AndrewC Dec 5 '12 at 2:21
up vote 1 down vote accepted

It's not clear to me which of these next three functions you wanted, so I've done them all:

testListAll :: [a -> Bool] -> a -> Bool
testListAll xs a = and $ map ($ a) xs

testListAny :: [a -> Bool] -> a -> Bool
testListAny xs a = or $ map ($ a) xs

testListList  :: [a -> Bool] -> a -> [Bool]
testListList xs a = map ($ a) xs

So for example,

> testListAll [(> 5), (== 7), even] 4
False
> testListAny [(> 5), (== 7), even] 4
True
> testListAll [(> 5), (== 8), even] 8
True
> testListList [(> 5), (== 8), even] 10
[True,False,True]

Now we can write functions like

test :: Integral a => a -> Bool
test n = if even n 
        then testListAll [(> 5), (< 9)] n
        else testListAny [(<= 5), (> 8)] n

giving

> test 5
True
> test 6
True
> test 7
False
> test 8
True
> test 9
True
> test 10
False
> test 11
True

Explanation

I'll explain one function in detail; the others work very similarly.

The first function could be written perhaps more simply as:

testListAll' :: [a -> Bool] -> a -> Bool
testListAll' xs a = and [f a | f <- xs]

so what it does is take each test function f from the list and apply it to the test value a. The function and :: [Bool] -> Bool gives True if everything in the list is True; this function checks if all the checks are satisfied.

So why did I write the right hand side as and $ map ($ a) xs? Well, in [f a | f <- xs] I'm doing the same thing to all of the elements f of xs, so I immediately thought to do that with map.

First think about

  map (+ 4) [1,2,3,4]
= [(+4) 1,  (+4) 2,  (+4) 3, (+4) 4]
= [1+4, 2+4, 3+4, 4+4]
= [5,6,7,8]

to see how we use the (low-precedence) function application operator $

  map ($ a) [(>4), (==7), (<10)]
= [($ a) (>4),  ($ a) (==7),  ($ a) (<10)]
= [(>4) $ a,  (==7) $ a,  (<10) $ a]
= [(>4) a,  (==7) a,  (<10) a]
= [a > 4 , a==7, a < 10]

Which gives you the same result as [f a| a <- [(>4), (==7), (<10)]].

share|improve this answer
    
This answer is too advanced and lacks the necessary explanation for the OP – luqui Dec 3 '12 at 16:09
    
@luqui A fair criticism of my original answer. I've updated it to included explanation, and I've provided an example basic solution too. – AndrewC Dec 5 '12 at 2:20

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