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I'm using this code to let the user enter in names while the program stores them in an array until they enter an empty string (they must press enter after each name):

people = []
info = 'a' # must fill variable with something, otherwise loop won't execute

while not info.empty?
    info = gets.chomp
    people += [Person.new(info)] if not info.empty?
end

This code would look much nicer in a do ... while loop:

people = []

do
    info = gets.chomp
    people += [Person.new(info)] if not info.empty?
while not info.empty?

In this code I don't have to assign info to some random string.

Unfortunately this type of loop doesn't seem to exist in Ruby. Can anybody suggest a better way of doing this?

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I think the normal while loop looks nicer, and is easier to read. –  Magne Nov 14 '13 at 10:57
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10 Answers

up vote 147 down vote accepted

Originally written by Jeremy Voorhis. The content has been copied here because it seems to have been taken down from the originating site. Copies can also be found in the Web Archive and at Ruby Buzz Forum. -Bill the Lizard

I found the following snippet while reading the source for Tempfile#initialize in the Ruby core library:

begin
  tmpname = File.join(tmpdir, make_tmpname(basename, n))
  lock = tmpname + '.lock'
  n += 1
end while @@cleanlist.include?(tmpname) or
  File.exist?(lock) or File.exist?(tmpname)

At first glance, I assumed the while modifier would be evaluated before the contents of begin...end, but that is not the case. Observe:

>> begin
?>   puts "do {} while ()" 
>> end while false
do {} while ()
=> nil

As you would expect, the loop will continue to execute while the modifier is true.

>> n = 3
=> 3
>> begin
?>   puts n
>>   n -= 1
>> end while n > 0
3
2
1
=> nil

While I would be happy to never see this idiom again, begin...end is quite powerful. The following is a common idiom to memoize a one-liner method with no params:

def expensive
  @expensive ||= 2 + 2
end

Here is an ugly, but quick way to memoize something more complex:

def expensive
  @expensive ||=
    begin
      n = 99
      buf = "" 
      begin
        buf << "#{n} bottles of beer on the wall\n" 
        # ...
        n -= 1
      end while n > 0
      buf << "no more bottles of beer" 
    end
end
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1  
:::: dead link. –  wilhelmtell Jul 9 '10 at 23:49
4  
Courtesy of the Wayback Machine: web.archive.org/web/20080206125158/http://archive.jvoorhis.com/… –  bta Jul 22 '10 at 15:32
40  
This is why when linking to an external site, I always make sure to copy the relevant info into my answer here. –  davr Sep 9 '10 at 0:03
4  
Why would you expect the while modifier to be evaluated before the contents of begin...end? That's the way do..while loops are supposed to work. And why would you "be happy to never see this idiom again?" What's wrong with it? I'm confused. –  bergie3000 Feb 13 '13 at 19:33
1  
begin...end looks like a block, similarly {...}. Nothing wrong with it. –  Victor Piousbox Jun 8 '13 at 5:22
show 2 more comments

CAUTION:

the begin <code> end while <condition> is regretted by Ruby's author Matz. Instead, he suggests to use Kernel#loop, e.g.

loop do 
  # some code here
  break if <condition>
end 

for more details, please refer to: http://blade.nagaokaut.ac.jp/cgi-bin/scat.rb/ruby/ruby-core/6745 (or via Wayback), and this wiki: http://rosettacode.org/wiki/Loops/Do-while#Ruby

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5  
Spot on. This begin end while method didn't seem right. Thanks for giving me the fodder I needed to convince the rest of the team. –  Josh Pinter Nov 25 '12 at 22:39
    
It looks like the begin-end-while loop is actually evaluating the condition before running the loop. The difference between that and a regular while loop is that it's guaranteed to run at least once. It's just close enough to do...while to cause problems. –  user1992284 Jun 12 '13 at 9:54
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Like this:

people = []

begin
  info = gets.chomp
  people += [Person.new(info)] if not info.empty?
end while not info.empty?

Reference: http://archive.jvoorhis.com/articles/2007/06/13/ruby-hidden-do-while-loop

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heh, beaten to it. damn. –  Blorgbeard Sep 25 '08 at 23:20
    
Won't this code add an empty string to the array if there is no input? –  AndrewR Sep 25 '08 at 23:25
    
That was my mistake, that was how my code was before I quickly edited it. –  Jeremy Ruten Sep 25 '08 at 23:40
    
It's easy to make mistakes in the rush for rep - I had to edit my answer twice before it was right :) –  AndrewR Sep 26 '08 at 1:54
8  
You can use until info.empty? rather than while not info.empty?. –  Andrew Grimm Aug 2 '11 at 2:56
show 2 more comments

How about this?

people = []

until (info = gets.chomp).empty?
  people += [Person.new(info)]
end
share|improve this answer
3  
Nice, much more elegant. –  Blorgbeard Sep 26 '08 at 0:27
15  
But this isn't "do ... while" loop. :) –  Alexander Prokofyev Sep 26 '08 at 4:50
3  
But it does the same thing in this case, unless I'm mistaken –  Blorgbeard Sep 30 '08 at 7:25
7  
@Blorgbeard, a do..while loop always runs once, then evaluates to see if it should continue running. A traditional while/until loop can run 0 times. It isn't a HUGE difference, but they are different. –  Scott S. Jan 7 '10 at 2:31
3  
@Scott, that's true - I just meant that this code is equivalent to the OP's, even though it doesn't use a do/while. Although really, this code does half of the loop's "work" in the condition, so it's not quite a traditional while loop either - if the condition doesn't match, some work is still done. –  Blorgbeard Apr 13 '10 at 21:13
show 4 more comments

Here's the full text article from hubbardr's dead link to my blog.

I found the following snippet while reading the source for Tempfile#initialize in the Ruby core library:

begin
  tmpname = File.join(tmpdir, make_tmpname(basename, n))
  lock = tmpname + '.lock'
  n += 1
end while @@cleanlist.include?(tmpname) or
  File.exist?(lock) or File.exist?(tmpname)

At first glance, I assumed the while modifier would be evaluated before the contents of begin...end, but that is not the case. Observe:

>> begin
?>   puts "do {} while ()" 
>> end while false
do {} while ()
=> nil

As you would expect, the loop will continue to execute while the modifier is true.

>> n = 3
=> 3
>> begin
?>   puts n
>>   n -= 1
>> end while n > 0
3
2
1
=> nil

While I would be happy to never see this idiom again, begin...end is quite powerful. The following is a common idiom to memoize a one-liner method with no params:

def expensive
  @expensive ||= 2 + 2
end

Here is an ugly, but quick way to memoize something more complex:

def expensive
  @expensive ||=
    begin
      n = 99
      buf = "" 
      begin
        buf << "#{n} bottles of beer on the wall\n" 
        # ...
        n -= 1
      end while n > 0
      buf << "no more bottles of beer" 
    end
end
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add comment

This works correctly now:

begin
    # statment
end until <condition>

But, it may be remove in the future, because the begin statement is counterintuitive. See: http://blade.nagaokaut.ac.jp/cgi-bin/scat.rb/ruby/ruby-core/6745

Matz recommended doing it this way:

loop do
    # ...
    break if <condition>
end
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add comment

From what I gather, Matz does not like the construct

begin
    <multiple_lines_of_code>
end while <cond>

because, it's semantics is different than

<single_line_of_code> while <cond>

in that the first construct executes the code first before checking the condition, and the second construct tests the condition first before the it executes the code (if ever). I take it Matz prefers to keep the second construct because it matches one line construct of if statements.

I never liked the second construct even for if statements. In all other cases, the computer e executes code left-to-right (eg. || and &&) top-to-bottom. Humans read code left-to-right top-to-bottom.

I suggest the following constructs instead

if <cond> then <one_line_code>      # matches case-when-then statement

while <cond> then <one_line_code>

<one_line_code> while <cond>

begin <multiple_line_code> end while <cond> # or something similar but left-to-right

I don't know if those suggestions will parse with the rest of the language. But in any case I prefere keeping left-to-right execution as well as language consistency.

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a = 1
while true
  puts a
  a += 1
  break if a > 10
end
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3  
this looks a bit like a goto. The code obfusticate your intention. –  Gerhard Nov 25 '10 at 13:14
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Here's another one:

people = []
1.times do
  info = gets.chomp
  unless info.empty? 
    people += [Person.new(info)]
    redo
  end
end
share|improve this answer
    
I prefer this as the unless is right up front and I don't read through a bunch of code (which could be more than shown here) only to find a 'dangling' unless at the end. It's a general principle in code that modifier and conditions are easier to use when they are 'up front' like this. –  Michael Durrant Mar 8 '12 at 18:05
    
I sometimes wish we coders had to pay cash for every extra compare. And that how it "looks" to us was less important than how it looks to the thing that uses it a million times a day. –  baash05 Dec 16 '12 at 22:15
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ppl = []
while (input=gets.chomp)
 if !input.empty?
  ppl << input
 else
 p ppl; puts "Goodbye"; break
 end
end
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2  
this looks a bit like a goto. The code obfusticate your intention and looks very unruby like. –  Gerhard Nov 25 '10 at 13:16
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