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Suppose I have class Function, whose instances are callables that take one argument. I defined pointwise arithmetic for these classes in the straightforward way. Here's a simplified version of my code (I actually have more complex behavior in __init__ and __call__ but it's irrelevant for this question):

class Function:
  '''
  >>> f = Function(lambda x : x**2)
  >>> g = Function(lambda x : x + 4)
  >>> h = f/g
  >>> h(6)
  3.6
  '''
  def __init__(self, func):
    self.func = func
  def __call__(self, value):
    return self.func(value)
  def __truediv__(self, other):
    if isinstance(other, Function):
        return Function(lambda x:self(x)/other(x))
    else:
        return NotImplemented
  # ...

I'm stuck when I try to allow implicit type conversions. For example, I want to be able to write:

>>> f = Function(lambda x : x ** 2)
>>> g = f+1
>>> g(5)
26

In other words, whenever I see a numeric object v in an arithmetic expression next to a Function instance, I want to convert v to Function(lambda x : v).

In addition, I want to achieve similar behavior for some of my user-defined types (again, whenever I see them in the same binary arithmetic expression with a Function object).

While I can certainly code this logic with a brute force assortment of regular and reflected binary arithmetic operators, each checking isinstance(v, numbers.Number), and isinstance(v, MyUserDefinedType), I feel there might be a more elegant way.

Also, if there are any other improvements possible with my design, please let me know. (Function objects are created rarely, but called very often, so performance is of some interest.)

EDIT:

To address @Eric's comment, I should clarify that I have another user-defined class Functional:

class Functional:
  '''
  >>> c = [1, 2, 3]
  >>> f = Functional(lambda x : x + 1)
  >>> f(c)
  [2, 3, 4]
  >>> g = Functional(lambda x : x ** 2)
  >>> h = f + g
  >>> h(c)
  [3, 7, 13]
  '''
  def __init__(self, func):
    self.func = func
  @staticmethod
  def from_function(self, function):
    return Functional(function.func)
  def __call__(self, container):
    return type(container)(self.func(c) for c in container)
  def __add__(self, other):
    if isinstance(other, Functional):
      return Functional(lambda x : self.func(x) + other.func(x))
    else:
      return NotImplemented

When I see both a Function and a Functional instance in the same arithmetic expression, I want Function to be implicitly converted to Functional using Functional.from_function method.

So, implicit type conversion hierarchy goes like this:

  • Functional
  • Function
  • anything else

And I'd like to implicitly convert to the highest type in this hierarchy seen in a given arithmetic expression.

share|improve this question
    
In general, don't you want to convert all non Functions to their lambda equivalent? –  Eric Dec 3 '12 at 8:30
    
@Eric Almost.. I actually have a higher level class, Functional, which operates on containers of values (creating a new container with each value processed by a certain function). When Function and Functional are in the same expression, I want both to be converted to Functional. Other than that, you're right. I'll update my question. –  max Dec 3 '12 at 8:32
    
Not sure what you mean by "brute force". Can't you write a utility function funcOrLambda(obj) that returns obj if the argument is a function or an instance of your Function class, otherwise returns lambda x: obj (or whatever logic you need)? Then you don't need to repeat the logic in every magic method. –  BrenBarn Dec 3 '12 at 8:32
    
If Functional subclasses Function, then operator lookup will happen first on the derived class. –  Eric Dec 3 '12 at 8:35
    
Have you looked at Sage as a CAS? –  katrielalex Dec 3 '12 at 8:48
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Something like this for all operators would work well:

def __truediv__(self, other):
  if callable(other):
      return Function(lambda x:self(x)/other(x))
  else:
      return Function(lambda x:self(x)/other)
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, that would seem to work, and it might be a lot faster than the solution I am currently trying out (I'm going to post in a sec). But I'll need to deal with Functional separately, I guess. –  max Dec 3 '12 at 9:21
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One option is to make all the operators in your Function class accept arbitrary values, which will be applied to the result of the underlying function if they're not functions themselves. For example, to extend allow f / 5, when f is a Function, simply modify the __truediv__ implementation you have to:

def __truediv__(self, other):
    if isinstance(other, Function):
        return Function(lambda x:self(x)/other(x))
    else:
        return Function(lambda x:self(x)/other)

You can optionally do some type checking to make sure that's sane (and raise errors early rather than later on), but it works without that.

share|improve this answer
    
Thx.. I'll probably go with the more general approach of checking if callable rather than if isinstance(other, Function), since the only reason Function isn't an instance of built-in function is that I am not allowed to subclass function... So all callables look to me equivalent to Function instances. –  max Dec 3 '12 at 9:23
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After reading the comments and the other answers, I tried this approach. I'm posting it to ask for feedback. I like that I can handle both Function and Functional in one swoop, but I'm afraid it might be very expensive in terms of performance:

class Function:
    '''
    >>> f = Function(lambda x : x**2)
    >>> g = Function(lambda x : x + 4)
    >>> h = f/g
    >>> h(6)
    3.6
    >>> k = f + 1
    >>> k(5)
    26
    >>> m = f + (lambda x : x + 1)
    >>> m(5)
    31
    '''
    def __init__(self, arg):
        if isinstance(arg, Function):
            self.func = arg.func
        elif callable(arg):
            self.func = arg
        else:
            self.func = lambda x : arg
    def __call__(self, value):
        return self.func(value)
    def __truediv__(self, other):
        return self.__class__(lambda x:Function(self)(x)/Function(other)(x))
    def __rtruediv__(self, other):
        return self.__class__(lambda x:Function(other)(x)/Function(self)(x))
    def __add__(self, other):
        return self.__class__(lambda x:Function(self)(x)+Function(other)(x))
    def __radd__(self, other):
        return self.__class__(lambda x:Function(other)(x)+Function(self)(x))
    # ...


class Functional(Function):
    '''
    >>> c = [1, 2, 3]
    >>> f = Functional(lambda x : x + 1)
    >>> f(c)
    [2, 3, 4]
    >>> g = Functional(lambda x : x ** 2)
    >>> h = f + g
    >>> h(c)
    [3, 7, 13]
    '''
    def __call__(self, container):
        return type(container)(self.func(c) for c in container)
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