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Possible Duplicate:
How to release std::vector if there is no heap memory

c++ noob here

Suppose I declare a vector of vectors like:

vector<vector<vector<double> > > phi_x;

After I'm done using it, how do I destroy it to free up memory?

I've read some other sites and they recommend using .clear(). From my understanding, this only deletes the elements but the vector capacity is not released. I want the vector to be completely forgotten like it never existed.

Also, my current application of the vector has dimensions of 54x54x9 and I've got about 12 of these things. Is that considered stupidly big?

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marked as duplicate by iammilind, Donal Fellows, Pfitz, fredoverflow, ecatmur Dec 3 '12 at 9:44

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
but this a vector of vectors of vectors, it's a very different question – thecoshman Dec 3 '12 at 9:39

You don't have to do anything. Just let the variable go out of scope.

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I see but does the memory allocation to the vector slow down the running of the rest of the code that follows after. – Keenan Z Dec 3 '12 at 8:40
    
@KeenanZ It's unlikely to. Profile your code to see. Either way, you can just add a nested block scope around each vector use. – Joseph Mansfield Dec 3 '12 at 9:03

If you call .clear(), the inner vectors will be completely be destroyed. However, the outermost vector may retain the memory it used for its array of vectors (phi_x.size() * sizeof(vector<vector<double> >) bytes). To fully clear it and release all memory, swap with an empty vector:

phi_x.swap(vector<vector<vector<double> > >());

Or simply let phi_x go out of scope.

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After I'm done using it, how do I destroy it to free up memory?

Just let it go out of scope.

my current application of the vector has dimensions of 54x54x9 and I've got about 12 of these things. Is that considered stupidly big?

It depends. If it is for an embedded platform with 64k memory, then yes, it is big. If it is for standard desktop PCs, with 4G+ RAM, then it can be neglected.

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You don't have to do anything, the destructor will clean up properly.

If you want to free the memory usage before it goes out of scope then you can cal clear on the top level. This will not reallocate the memory used by the top vector but it will remove all the contained vectors and they will release their memory in their destructors.

That is about 1 million elements of type double if I calculate it right. Assuming a modern PC as a platform that isn't stupidly big. Or even very big :)

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If your phi_x variable is some local variable inside some block, it will be destroyed by having its destructor called at end of block.

If it is a global variable, it would be destoyed after main ended.

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If this vector as shown by your example, there is no need to do any additional cleaning up, memory will be properly freed by the destructor as soon as it goes out of scope.

This will happen as soon as the function it is declared within exits or if the object it lives in is destroyed.

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The destructor will do the job of cleaning up for you. You don't have to do anything but let phi_x go out of scope.

{
    vector<vector<vector<double> > > phi_x;

    // do stuff with phi_x
}
// phi_x is gone here
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