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I reading the Microsoft C# guide, I feel very confuse.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/acy3edy3(v=vs.100).aspx

On this page, a statement say Main should not be public?

Main is declared inside a class or struct. Main must be static and it should not be public. (In the earlier example, it receives the default access of private.) The enclosing class or struct is not required to be static.

I feel very confuse because I can compile and run by

public static void Main

And In my general understand on C++, Java, Main can be public.
Is the MSDN article has typo?

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"should" just means it's a guideline. Here's some reasoning why: stackoverflow.com/questions/3110184/why-is-main-method-private –  0xA3 Dec 3 '12 at 9:41
    
Bizarre that this is their guideline but their IDE defaults to ignoring it. –  Rawling Dec 3 '12 at 9:43
    
@0xA3 Thats correct. Main shouldn't ever be called by the user, thus it'd be a good idea to make it as encapsulated or "hidden" as possible –  Jaakko Lipsanen Dec 3 '12 at 9:43

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I feel very confuse because I can compile and run by

Its a guideline not a rule, so compiler has nothing to do with it.

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I agree it is just a guideline, is it only to prevent user to call the Main function later ? –  AlexH Dec 3 '12 at 9:45
    
@AlexH, YES, making it public will make the method accessible outside the assembly. –  Habib Dec 3 '12 at 9:48
3  
@AlexH, here is a good discussion about it. social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en-CA/csharpgeneral/thread/… –  Habib Dec 3 '12 at 9:49
1  
Great thanks to everyone! I love stackoverflow! –  Virtual Jasper Dec 3 '12 at 9:59

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