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I am developing an linux kernel module in which I want to evaluate the level of battery power supply. I measured the voltage on the battery during charging. As a result, I received the experimental dependence such as:

10:28:15    7898
10:29:15    7902
10:30:15    7908
10:31:15    7913
10:32:15    7918
10:33:15    7921

enter image description here

Now I need to interpolate the resulting graph with second-degree polynomial.

How can I do this with R programming language?

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1  
Second-degree polynomials between points, or one across the whole graph? –  Tim Dec 3 '12 at 9:49
    
One across the whole graph. –  ymn Dec 3 '12 at 9:51
2  
The graph is clearly non-quadratic. But if you insist, read ?lm. –  Tim Dec 3 '12 at 9:52
    
Thanks for advice! –  ymn Dec 3 '12 at 9:58

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Use lm to fit a linear model to data:

> x <- 0:9
> y <- 1+2*x+3*x^2
> fit <- lm( y ~ x + I(x^2) )
> fit

Call:
lm(formula = y ~ x + I(x^2))

Coefficients:
(Intercept)            x       I(x^2)  
          1            2            3  

But you should probably reconsider your quadratic model of this data.

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