Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am unable to verify my code as it cannot be compiled and executed. I'm thinking there is a possibility of an infinite loop, which I doubt more and more. Being fairly new to c, I can't be sure of my errors, without executing my program. I'm in quite a predicament.

The purpose of the program is to set a variable number of observation (data sets per animal) as numbers of line in an array, when entered by the user. Whit the data, the program determine the number of females under 1 kg, the data set of males longer than 30 cm, the average age of female, the average age of males, the smallest animal size and the longest animal size in the array.

#include <stdio.h>

main() {

    int nbAnimal, //Number of observed animals
        totAnimal, //Animal accounted for
        totFem, //Females accounted for
        totMale, //Males accounted for
        totLite, //Femelles under 1.0 kg accounted for
        sumAgeF, //Sum of the age of females
        sumAgeM; //Sum if the age of the males
    int age[nbAnimal]; //Age of animals, in days

    char gender[nbAnimal]; //Gender, 'M' ou 'F'

    float weight[nbAnimal], //Animal's weight
          length[nbAnimal]; //Length of the animals
    float smallest, 
          longest;

          //Input a variable number of array lignes
          printf("Enter the number of observed animals. \n");
          scanf("%d", &nbAnimal);

          //Initialization
          totAnimal = 0;

          while (totAnimal < nbAnimal){
                printf("Enter the gender, the age, the weight and the length of the animal #%d : \n", totAnimal + 1);
                scanf(" %c %d %f %f", &gender[totAnimal], &age[totAnimal], &weight[totAnimal], &length[totAnimal]);
                totAnimal++;
          }

          //Initialization      
          totFem = 0;
          totMale = 0;
          totLite = 0;
          sumAgeF = 0;
          sumAgeM = 0;
          smallest = 3000.00; 
          longest = 0.0;

          for (totAnimal = 0; totAnimal <= nbAnimal; totAnimal++) {
              if (length[totAnimal] > longest)
              longest = length[totAnimal];

              else if (length[totAnimal] < smallest)
              smallest = length[totAnimal];

              else if (gender[totAnimal] == 'F') {
              sumAgeF += age[totAnimal];
              totFem++;
              }

              else if (gender[totAnimal] == 'F' || weight[totAnimal] < 1.0) 
              totLite++;

              else if (gender[totAnimal] == 'M') {
              sumAgeM += age[totAnimal];
              totMale++;
              }

              else if (gender[totAnimal] == 'M' || length[totAnimal] > 30.0)
              printf("Animal #%d is over 30.0 cm. His data is : \n %c %d %f %f", totAnimal, gender[totAnimal], age[totAnimal], weight[totAnimal], length[totAnimal]);

          }

          printf("The number of female under 1.0 kg is : %d\n", totLite);
          printf("The average age of females is : %f days\n", sumAgeF/ totFem);
          printf("The average age of males is : %f days\n", sumAgeM/ totMale);
          printf("The smallest animal is : %f cm\n", smallest);
          printf("The longest animal is : %f cm\n", longest);

    getch();

}
share|improve this question
4  
If it can not be compiled, what errors do you get? –  Joachim Pileborg Dec 3 '12 at 9:57
1  
Also, you create arrays using the nbAnimal variable before it's initialized. That won't work, as it will contain a random value. –  Joachim Pileborg Dec 3 '12 at 9:58
    
@gokcehan See getch. –  Olaf Dietsche Dec 3 '12 at 10:03
    
Error messages? The steps are: design, write, compile, link, test, debug, test, debug......... deliver, maintain. To help us help you to get past step 2, you should provide us with the errors you encounter else we end up either repeating what you have already done, doing all your work for you or just moving on to look at another question. –  Martin James Dec 3 '12 at 10:04
    
For the last 4 calls to printf() the conversion specifiers do not match the variables passed in. –  alk Dec 3 '12 at 10:05

4 Answers 4

you can statically set a size of an array with a parameter:

 int nbAnimal, //Number of observed animals // << here nbAnimal is a parameter
        totAnimal, //Animal accounted for
        totFem, //Females accounted for
        totMale, //Males accounted for
        totLite, //Femelles under 1.0 kg accounted for
        sumAgeF, //Sum of the age of females
        sumAgeM; //Sum if the age of the males
    int age[nbAnimal]; //Age of animals, in days // << here you try to set an array size using this size.

    char gender[nbAnimal]; //Gender, 'M' ou 'F' // << here you try to set an array size using this size.

    float weight[nbAnimal], //Animal's weight// << here you try to set an array size using this size.
          length[nbAnimal]; //Length of the animals// << here you try to set an array size using this size.

The compiler can't know the value of nbAnimal at compilation time.
if the size is constant you can use
#define nbAnimal = 10 //or what ever number
if the size is dynamically (given at run time) you should use dynamic memory, Ex:

int *age;

//get nbAnimal value...

age = (int *)malloc (nbAnimel * sizeof(int));//allocation the memory for the array on the fly.

//do your work...

free (age);//free the dynamic memory
share|improve this answer
1  
This is tagged c not c++. –  Olaf Dietsche Dec 3 '12 at 10:04
    
@OlafDietsche - you are right, I fixed it. –  Roee Gavirel Dec 3 '12 at 10:07
1  
Creating arrays runtime without malloc/new etc. is supported in C99, the OP just have to declare them after the variable nbAnimal is properly set. –  Joachim Pileborg Dec 3 '12 at 10:09
    
@JoachimPileborg - in that case here he will probably create a 0 size arrays in debug mode and a unknown size array in release... even if it's supported it's bad practice. –  Roee Gavirel Dec 3 '12 at 10:12

Trying to compile I get this error:

/tmp/ccUwhmDS.o: In function `main':
animal.c:(.text+0x3a8): undefined reference to `getch'

getch() is defined (in Windows) on conio.h, try to add at the top this to have it compiled:

#include <conio.h>

In Linux, getch() doesn't exist, you'll have to do with getchar().

After I removed that line, I get this:

bf@desktop-bf:~/playground$ ./animal 
Segmentation fault (core dumped)

Not an infinite loop, but memory errors (the other answers do address this).

share|improve this answer
    
There is a getch() in libcurses. –  alk Dec 3 '12 at 10:13
    
@alk, I found that yes, but seeing the code / question, I reckon having to compile against an extra library would be too hard. –  Bart Friederichs Dec 3 '12 at 10:22
    
Yes, you are propably right ... :-/ @BartFriederichs –  alk Dec 3 '12 at 10:29

You have to do something like this,

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main(void) {

    int nbAnimal, //Number of observed animals
        totAnimal, //Animal accounted for
        totFem, //Females accounted for
        totMale, //Males accounted for
        totLite, //Femelles under 1.0 kg accounted for
        sumAgeF, //Sum of the age of females
        sumAgeM; //Sum if the age of the males
    int *age; //Age of animals, in days

    char *gender; //Gender, 'M' ou 'F'

    float *weight, //Animal's weight
          *length; //Length of the animals
    float smallest, 
          longest;

    //Input a variable number of array lignes
    printf("Enter the number of observed animals. \n");
    scanf("%d", &nbAnimal);

    //Initialization
    totAnimal = 0;
    age = malloc(sizeof(int) * nbAnimal);
    gender = malloc(sizeof(char) * nbAnimal);
    weight = malloc(sizeof(float) * nbAnimal);
    length = malloc(sizeof(float) * nbAnimal);

    while (totAnimal < nbAnimal){
        printf("Enter the gender, the age, the weight and the length of the animal #%d : \n", totAnimal + 1);
        scanf(" %c %d %f %f", &gender[totAnimal], &age[totAnimal], &weight[totAnimal], &length[totAnimal]);
        totAnimal++;
    }

    //Initialization      
    totFem = 0;
    totMale = 0;
    totLite = 0;
    sumAgeF = 0;
    sumAgeM = 0;
    smallest = 3000.00f; 
    longest = 0.0;

    for (totAnimal = 0; totAnimal <= nbAnimal; totAnimal++) {

        if (length[totAnimal] > longest)
            longest = length[totAnimal];

        if (length[totAnimal] < smallest)
            smallest = length[totAnimal];

        if (gender[totAnimal] == 'F') {
            sumAgeF += age[totAnimal];
            totFem++;
            if (weight[totAnimal] < 1.0) 
                totLite++;
        }
        else if (gender[totAnimal] == 'M') {
            sumAgeM += age[totAnimal];
            totMale++;
            if (length[totAnimal] > 30.0)
                printf("Animal #%d is over 30.0 cm. His data is : \n %c %d %f %f", totAnimal, gender[totAnimal], age[totAnimal], weight[totAnimal], length[totAnimal]);
        }
    }

    printf("The number of female under 1.0 kg is : %d\n", totLite);
    printf("The average age of females is : %f days\n", sumAgeF/ (float)totFem);
    printf("The average age of males is : %f days\n", sumAgeM/ (float)totMale);
    printf("The smallest animal is : %f cm\n", smallest);
    printf("The longest animal is : %f cm\n", longest);

    free(age);
    free(gender);
    free(weight);
    free(length);

}
share|improve this answer

The compiler needs to now the array size prior to declaring the arrays.

To have the compiler allocate the arrays using the size entered by the user the arrays shall be declared after the user had entered the size.

You might like to modify your source like so:

int main() {
  int nbAnimal, //Number of observed animals
      totAnimal, //Animal accounted for
      totFem, //Females accounted for
      totMale, //Males accounted for
      totLite, //Femelles under 1.0 kg accounted for
      sumAgeF, //Sum of the age of females
      sumAgeM; //Sum if the age of the males

  //Input a variable number of array lignes
  printf("Enter the number of observed animals. \n");
  scanf("%d", &nbAnimal);

  int age[nbAnimal]; //Age of animals, in days

  char gender[nbAnimal]; //Gender, 'M' ou 'F'

  float weight[nbAnimal], //Animal's weight
      length[nbAnimal]; //Length of the animals
  float smallest, 
      longest;

  //Initialization
  totAnimal = 0;

  ...
share|improve this answer
    
The compiler (at least gcc) doesn't care. If the undefined value is negative your program will segfault, otherwise it will just have defined an array with an undefined size. –  Bart Friederichs Dec 3 '12 at 10:24
    
gcc doesn't care for what? Please clarifiy what you are referring to. I do agree that entering a negative value would not make sense, but lead to UB and should be caught by the program. @BartFriederichs –  alk Dec 3 '12 at 10:27
    
gcc doesn't care that you are creating arrays from uninitialised values. I compiled the OP's code and got only warnings in printf. –  Bart Friederichs Dec 3 '12 at 10:32
    
Correct. My wording was somehow misleading. Adjusted my answer. @BartFriederichs –  alk Dec 3 '12 at 10:41

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.