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Say I have a string

String s = bob

and the ArrayList

["alex [available]", "bob [away]", "craig [busy]", "david [gone fishing]"]

How would I search the list to get the element at [1]?

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you want to get "bob" only? –  andreih Dec 3 '12 at 10:47
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5 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted
String strToSearch = yourString + " [";//"bob ["

for (int i = 0; i < list.size(); i++){
    if (list.get(i).startsWith(strToSearch)){
         neededIndex = i;
         break;
    }
}
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3  
+1. But maybe add a " [" at the end of yourstring to not mix up Jon and Jonathan. –  Thilo Dec 3 '12 at 10:48
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You have to iterate the list and do a String.contains("bob") on every item.

for (String item : listOfItems) {
   if (item.contains("bob") {
      return item;
   }
}

Maybe you should extend the search term to bob [ because "bob" might be contained in anoter name.

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+1 for the enhanced for loop, and the return instead of ugly break, but OP probably wants a prefix match (did not say so, though). –  Thilo Dec 3 '12 at 10:50
2  
contains is perhaps too broad. "susan [bobbing for apples]" –  Peter Lawrey Dec 3 '12 at 10:50
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You probably should be using a Map instead of a List. In this case you need to use a loop.

List<String> nameStatusList = ...
String s = "bob";

FOUND: {
    for(String ns: nameStatusList)
       if(ns.startsWith(s + " [")) {
           System.out.println(ns);
           break FOUND;
       }
    System.out.println("Couldn't find " + s);
}
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1  
Uhh, why this ugly label? –  user714965 Dec 3 '12 at 10:50
    
@user714965 So it can handle the "not found" condition without additional checks. –  Peter Lawrey Dec 3 '12 at 10:52
2  
Maybe an extra method and a return ns/return null is an idea. –  Thilo Dec 3 '12 at 10:52
    
@Thilo three people also suggested this ;) so I wanted to provide an alternative. –  Peter Lawrey Dec 3 '12 at 10:54
    
@PeterLawrey: Re: alternative. You did mention using a better datastructure, too ;-) –  Thilo Dec 3 '12 at 10:56
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Something like this:

String string = "bob";

private List <String> list = new ArrayList<String>(){{
    add("alex [available]");
    add("bob [away]");
    add("craig [busy]");
    add("david [gone fishing]");
}};


public void method(){
    String answer;

    for (String s : list){
        if (s.contains(string)){
            answer = s;
            break;
        }
    }
}
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1  
-0.5 for new String .... What's wrong with null? –  Thilo Dec 3 '12 at 10:58
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for (String str: list) {
   if (str.contains(s)) {
      return str;
   }
}

Replace str.contains(s) with str.matches("^"+s+" [") just in case.

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Regex injection vulnerability! –  Thilo Dec 3 '12 at 10:59
    
@Thilo You're right, we should avoid regex. But in this case isn't str.matches("^"+s+" [") equivalent to str.startsWith(s+" [")? –  Terry Li Dec 3 '12 at 11:04
    
Not if s = ".*" for example. You need to escape/quote strings before putting them into a regex. –  Thilo Dec 3 '12 at 12:10
    
@Thilo Thank you for pointing that out. –  Terry Li Dec 3 '12 at 12:13
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