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I am new to Python. How can we explain this code step by step. I couldn't understand some parts.

myList=[43,21,12,80,3,2,35]
end=len(myList)-1
while (end!=-1):
    swapped=-1
    for i in range(0,end):
        if myList[i]>myList[i+1]:
            temp=myList[i]
            myList[i]=myList[i+1]
            myList[i+1]=temp
            swapped=i
    end=swapped
print(myList)
share|improve this question

closed as not constructive by iiSeymour, interjay, the Tin Man, stusmith, gimpf Dec 3 '12 at 13:48

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

5  
Be specific. Exactly what don't you understand? – Daniel Roseman Dec 3 '12 at 12:31
1  
    
Is it the algorithm you're having a problem with, or the code itself? – Keith Gaughan Dec 3 '12 at 12:32
    
I am sorry I am also new to stackoverflow. I don't have a problem with algorithm. For example in while loop can't we say while(True) instead of while(end!=-1) and why do we use swapped=-1. Thanks a lot – kollarotta Dec 3 '12 at 12:37
    
@flopoe Could you indicate to us where you originally got this code? Also, -1 is acting as a sentinel: if the code is passed through without that changing to an index, it means that the whole list has been sorted. The author used -1 as it's not a normal list index. – Keith Gaughan Dec 3 '12 at 12:48
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Using while True would create an infinite loop if you forget to add code which will break the loop. In this case that break should only happen when swapped is still -1 at the end of the for-loop. Thus the following code:

myList=[43,21,12,80,3,2,35]
end=len(myList)-1
while True:
    swapped=-1
    for i in range(0,end):
        if myList[i]>myList[i+1]:
            temp=myList[i]
            myList[i]=myList[i+1]
            myList[i+1]=temp
            swapped=i
    if swapped == -1:
        break
print(myList)

If you count the number of lines of this example and compare them with the original you'll see that the original is 1 line shorter. And checking against a value is in my opinion a better way-of-working than using while True: (or while False: for that matter).

share|improve this answer

I think all your questions have been answered (they while(True) = infinite loop) and that swapped acts as 'is sorted' flag.

one thing that is very cool in python is that you do not need to have a temp variable as you do with in c, so you can change the if statement to:

if myList[i]>myList[i+1]:
    myList[i+1], myList[i] = myList[i], myList[i+1]
    swapped=i

or

if myList[i]>myList[i+1]:
    j = i + 1
    myList[j], myList[i] = myList[i], myList[j]
    swapped=i

if you do not want to compute i+1 twice

Also notice that range(0,-1) returns an empty list instead of trowing an exception

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot I understood but one last question why do we need swapped=i? – kollarotta Dec 3 '12 at 14:09
    
@flopoe because swapped starts as -1 and is assigned to end, if you delete the swapped line you exit the loop after 1 iteration, the ingenious is that if nothing is swapped the list is obvious sorted and we are done – jcr Dec 3 '12 at 14:28

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