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So i have this csv file and one collumn looks like this:

1022
1040
1042
1035
11728
1036
1022
1040
1042
1035
11728
1036
1022
1040
1042
1035
11728

Now i need to count how oftend a number occurs. I need this to make a graphic picture with matplotlib. So the graphic will show how much a number occurs (in this situation it's a event id)

so far i only have the code to print that row...

my_reader = csv.reader(open(csvpath))
for col in my_reader:
      print col[3]

how do i count how often a number in that specific collumn occurs?

share|improve this question
    
Doesn't look like CSV or indeed a row - is your example actual data –  Jon Clements Dec 3 '12 at 13:12
    
The homework tag is being removed, please don't use it. –  Martijn Pieters Dec 3 '12 at 13:12
    
@JonClements: I think the OP meant 'one column' instead. The code references row[3]. –  Martijn Pieters Dec 3 '12 at 13:12
    
Your code snippet references [3] (the fourth column), but you speak about a specific row. Give us an example output based on your example input. –  eumiro Dec 3 '12 at 13:13
    
Yes i meant one collumn ;) –  DT22 Dec 4 '12 at 9:55

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Just create a mapping from number to count. The collections.Counter() class makes that easiest:

import collections

counts = collections.Counter()
for row in my_reader:
    counts[row[3]] += 1

Using a collections.defaultdict is also an option:

counts = collections.defaultdict(int)
for row in my_reader:
    counts[row[3]] += 1

or you can use a normal dict:

counts = {}
for row in my_reader:
    counts[row[3]] = counts.get(row[3], 0) + 1
share|improve this answer
    
counts = collections.Counter(row[3] for row in my_reader) for those who like one-liners. –  Steven Rumbalski Dec 3 '12 at 14:44
    
thnx i used one of your codes :) the only thing i needed to do is change the output so i can use it with matplotlib to create a graph. The matplotlib only takes ("1003", 1) and the output of your codes is , '1003' : 1,. i changed it with replace() –  DT22 Dec 4 '12 at 17:59
    
@DT22: Use counts.items() to get a sequence of tuples of (key, count). –  Martijn Pieters Dec 4 '12 at 18:00
    
While this a good answer when using python I think it is not a good answer for somebody who uses the scipy ecosystem. With numpy/matplotlib/pandas ... you would normally use parsers that return arrays (numpy.loadtxt, numpy.genfromtxt, pandas.read_csv) and try to use vectorized functions (which are not available in the python standard library). Sometimes it feels like scientific python is a different language at all. –  bmu Dec 6 '12 at 21:29

You can use a simply dictionary.

my_reader = csv.reader(open(csvpath))
my_dict = {}
for row in my_reader:
    try:
        my_dict[row[3]] += 1
    except KeyError:
        my_dict[row[3]] = 0
share|improve this answer

This code will count total number in rows, if you want to particular row then use if condition before print statement and check if count==row_number exa: if count==3: and get total numbers.

         reader=csv.reader(open("first.csv"))
         count=0;
         for row in reader:
             count+=1
             print "total no in row "+str(count)+" is "+str(len(row))
             for i in row:
                 print i
share|improve this answer

You can use pandas to read your data, count the values and than plot it. Behind the scenes pandas uses numpy and matplotlib to achieve this. read_csv and the plotting commands work for multiple columns too.

In [29]: df = pd.read_csv('data.csv', names=['my_data']) 

In [30]: counts = df['my_data'].value_counts()

In [31]: counts
Out[31]: 
1022     3
1042     3
1040     3
1035     3
11728    3
1036     2

In [32]: counts.plot(kind='barh')
Out[32]: <matplotlib.axes.AxesSubplot at 0x4f7f510>

value_counts

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