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I have a templated class with the template argument the number of dimensions of some datapoints the class shall save. This class has a specialized version MyClass<-1> that allows for dimensions not known at compile time.

How can I cast a specific class (say MyClass<2>) to this more general form?

To be a bit more concrete, here is some artificial example that shows the situation. (I use the Eigen library, but I suppose for the general principle this should not matter)

using namespace Eigen;

template <std::size_t dim>
class MyClass {
  public:
    // Some constructors...

    // A sample function:
    Matrix<double, dim, 1> returnPoint();

    // Some more functions here

  private:
    Matrix<double, dim, 1> point;
}

Now, suppose I have the following code segment:

MyClass<2> *foo;
MyClass<Dynamic> *bar;  // Dynamic is a Eigen constant, being defined as -1

// Do something here

// How to do this:
bar = some_cast<MyClass<Dynamic> *>(foo);

Thinking about the problem I suppose what I want is impossible to archive without actually copying the values of point. Anybody able to prove me wrong or confirm this assumption?

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Considered inheritance? It does seem likely that a copy will be the simplest solution by quite a stretch. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Dec 3 '12 at 13:45
    
The whole templating approach is about performance - having a known, small dimension there allows another level of compiler optimization than in the general case. Could this be done with inheritance? As performance is critical, it would be sweet if I could avoid the copy... if possible. –  Thilo Dec 3 '12 at 13:47
    
I don't see how. If you're moving from an optimised case (presumably automatic-storage memory) to a non-optimised case, you have to copy the data unless the non-optimised case supports the optimised case inherently, in which case you'd have just used that to begin with. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Dec 3 '12 at 13:49
    
You could use inheritance only for the MyClass<Dynamic> case, and leave the static case as it is. In this approach, MyClass<Dynamic> would be an interface, and your some_cast<> could return an implementer of that interface that wraps the static MyClass<> instantiation. –  enobayram Dec 3 '12 at 13:49
1  
Consider the following: I have optimised my car for weight by taking out all but the driver's seat. Now I wish to have three passengers. Can I do this? Perhaps by storing the other seats in the boot? Then you have lost the benefit of removing the seats in the first place. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Dec 3 '12 at 13:50

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

It is possible to achieve the casting without actually copying the values but only if you have been careful make it work.

When you instantiate a class template with two different sets of arguments you get two distinct classes that are not related. Unless you specifically define one to inherit from the other, for example:

namespace with_inheritance {

template <class T, long sz>
class vector : public vector<T,-1> {
    typedef vector<T,-1> base_t;
public:
    vector() : base_t (sz) { }
};

template <class T>
class vector<T, -1> {
    T* v_;
    size_t sz_;
public:
    vector(size_t sz) : v_ (new T[sz]), sz_ (sz) { }
    ~vector() { delete [] v_; }
    T& operator[](size_t i)
    {
        if (i >= sz_) throw i;
        return v_[i];
    }
};

} // with_inheritance

So in this case you can cast as in:

namespace wi = with_inheritance;
wi::vector<double, 10> v;
wi::vector<double, -1>* p = &v;
std::cout << (*p)[1] << '\n';

Without the inheritance relationship casting between them will not be permitted. You can, however, use reinterpret_cast to get around the type system when you want to. But you have be very careful that the objects have identical layout and invariants to make sure everthing will work ok. As in:

namespace with_lots_of_care {

template <class T, long sz>
class vector {
    T* v_;
    size_t sz_;
public:
    vector() : v_ (new T[sz]), sz_ (sz) { }
    ~vector() { delete [] v_; }
    T& operator[](size_t i)
    {
        if (i >= sz_) throw i;
        return v_[i];
    }
};

template <class T>
class vector<T, -1> {
    T* v_;
    size_t sz_;
public:
    vector(size_t sz) : v_ (new T[sz]), sz_ (sz) { }
    ~vector() { delete [] v_; }
    T& operator[](size_t i)
    {
        if (i >= sz_) throw i;
        return v_[i];
    }
};

} // with_lots_of_care

And then cast as in:

namespace wc = with_lots_of_care;
wc::vector<double, 10> v;
wc::vector<double, -1>* p = reinterpret_cast<wc::vector<double, -1>*>(&v);
std::cout << (*p)[1] << '\n';
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