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Im having some trouble understanding Inheritance in classes and wondering why this bit of python code is not working, can anyone walk me through what is going wrong here?

## Animal is-a object 
class Animal(object):
    def __init__(self, name, sound):
        self.implimented = False
        self.name = name
        self.sound = sound

    def speak(self):
        if self.implimented == True:
            print "Sound: ", self.sound

    def animal_name(self):
        if self.implimented == True:
            print "Name: ", self.name



## Dog is-a Animal
class Dog(Animal):

    def __init__(self):
        self.implimented = True
        name = "Dog"
        sound = "Woof"

mark = Dog(Animal)

mark.animal_name()
mark.speak()

This is the output through the terminal

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "/private/var/folders/nd/4r8kqczj19j1yk8n59f1pmp80000gn/T/Cleanup At Startup/ex41-376235301.968.py", line 26, in <module>
    mark = Dog(Animal)
TypeError: __init__() takes exactly 1 argument (2 given)
logout

I was trying to get animal to check if an animal was implemented, and then if so, get the classes inheriting from animal to set the variables that Animals would then be able to manipulate.

share|improve this question
    
Do note that your if statements are a little odd here. if self.implimented == True: can be simplified to if self.implimented:. –  Lattyware Dec 3 '12 at 14:14
    
But isn't it previously set to false in the init? –  lerugray Dec 3 '12 at 14:19

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted
  1. To create an instance of a class you do

    mark = Dog()
    

    not mark = Dog(Animal).

  2. Don't do this implimented stuff. If you want a class that you can't instantiate (i.e. you have to subclass first), do

    import abc
    class Animal(object):
        __metaclass__ = abc.ABCMeta
    
        def speak(self):
            ...
    
share|improve this answer
    
Why not do the implemented stuff? what would be a better way of having the code check to see the animal (class) exists? or like for example if one of the animals was a koala that didn't speak. –  lerugray Dec 3 '12 at 13:57
2  
@lerugray you can't have it both ways: if you define an animal to be something that can speak, then a koala-that-can't-speak is not an animal. –  katrielalex Dec 3 '12 at 13:59
    
Awesome! That makes sense, thank you katrielalex! –  lerugray Dec 3 '12 at 14:00
1  
You could of course set self.sound = None for those animals that don't speak, then check in your speak method whether sound is not None. –  Daniel Roseman Dec 3 '12 at 14:00

katrielalex answered your question pretty well, but I'd also like to point out that your classes are somewhat poorly - if not incorrectly - coded. There seems to be few misunderstandings about the way you use classes.

First, I would recommend reading the Python docs to get the basic idea: http://docs.python.org/2/tutorial/classes.html

To create a class, you simply do

class Animal:
    def __init__(self, name, sound): # class constructor
        self.name = name
        self.sound = sound

And now you can create name objects by calling a1 = Animal("Leo The Lion", "Rawr") or so.

To inherit a class, you do:

# Define superclass (Animal) already in the class definition
class Dog(Animal):

    # Subclasses can take additional parameters, such as age
    def __init__(self, age):

        # Use super class' (Animal's) __init__ method to initialize name and sound
        # You don't define them separately in the Dog section
        super(Dog, self).__init__("Dog", "Woof")

        # Normally define attributes that don't belong to super class
        self.age = age

And now you can create a simple Dog object by saying d1 = Dog(18) and you don't need to use d1 = Dog(Animal), you already told the class that it's superclass is Animal at the first line class Dog(Animal):

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2  
@lerugray I've never been sure whether LPTHW is meant to be a parody or not. I definitely don't think it's a way to learn Python. I'd recommend How to Think Like a Computer Scientist. –  katrielalex Dec 3 '12 at 14:11
2  
If you wanted every last one of your animals to have an age, you would define both age and printAge in the parent class, Animal. If you wanted SOME of the animals to have an age, you would inherit AgedAnimal from Animal, which would implement age and printAge, and then inherit Dog from AgedAnimal. If only Dog has age, you code the age and printAge into Dog, and keep Animal as it is. –  user1632861 Dec 3 '12 at 14:14
2  
@lerugray You would init age in the Animal.__init__() -method, yes. If there are two or more classes with common attributes (for example age), you code the common attribute into their Base class. –  user1632861 Dec 3 '12 at 14:19
1  
@Lattyware Multiple inheritance might be designed for that exact purpose, but no, it does not make sense. To begin with, I'm a C++ programmer, not a Java programmer, what is wrong with everyone acting like they'd know something about the other person, or like if everyone was a Java coder? Second, there's a reason most programming languages don't support multiple inheritance: It's a mess, bad way of coding and against every possible rule in a good code. As I mentioned, if you'll ever get to create a real large project, you can't use multiple inheritance, regardless of the language. –  user1632861 Dec 3 '12 at 16:38
1  
@Mahi I was using Java as an example of a very rigid language that didn't support MI - I wasn't suggesting you were a Java programmer. If you could give some actual reasons for MI being a bad thing, that'd be great - I'm happy to read links. I agree it can be used to bad effect, but I don't see it being a bad thing in general. –  Lattyware Dec 3 '12 at 17:26

Since age in the given example is not part of the parent (or base) class, you have to implement the the function (which in a class is called method) in the class which inheritted (also known as derived class).

class Dog(Animal):

    # Subclasses can take additional parameters, such as age
    def __init__(self, age):
        ... # Implementation can be found in reaction before this one

    def give_age( self ):
        print self.age
share|improve this answer
1  
What exactly did this add to my answer? You don't have to implement a single method which you don't need. This answer is actually not true, and it might only distract newcomers. –  user1632861 Dec 3 '12 at 16:37
    
@Mahi: at the time I gave my answer, I assumed that the OP wanted to implement age in the derived class since that was part of your example, which I only used as base. And I assumed he wanted a method to access age from that question. I only tried to help. –  Nemelis Dec 4 '12 at 14:54

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