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Preface: I'm fairly new to Camel, and after digesting Camel in action as best as possible, I'm adapting it to a project I'm on. In this project, we have some rather complex error handling, and I want to make sure I can replicate this as we Camel-ize our code.

On our project (as most) there are a set of Exceptions we want to retry and a set that we don't - but more specifically, there are a set that we want to retry more than others (not all recoverable errors can be treated the same). In this case, I was attempting to define an onException block to change the redelivery policy. However, it seems that the Exchange maintains the count (Exchange.REDELIVERY_COUNTER) and that this count is not dependent on which exception is thrown. Is there a way to make this count be specific for a given exception?

For example - I have two exceptions FooException and BarException. In my route (or really in the whole context), I want to retry FooExceptions 10 times, but BarExceptions should only retry 2 times. So the context will contain:

<onException>
     <exception>my.exception.FooException</exception>
     <redeliveryPolicy maximumRedeliveries="10" redeliveryDelay="2000"
</onException>

<onException>
      <exception>my.exception.BarException</exception>
      <redeliveryPolicy maximumRedeliveries="2" redeliveryDelay="5000"
</onException>

Now, the concern - if my application throws a FooException and retries 4 times (each time throwing a FooException) and then on the 5th attempt, it throws a BarException, it seems that the way this works is the Exchange will have a REDELIVERY_COUNTER of 5, and when I reset the policy to only try twice, it (logically) concludes that the route should not be retried and throws the exception back out. However, in my application BarExceptions should be retried twice, regardless of how many FooExceptions get thrown. And likewise, if it alternates throwing Foo and Bar exceptions, I would like it to only increment the counter for the given exception.

The very end of Camel in Action promotes using a retryWhile - is this the only way to grab the kind of control I'm looking for? Do I need to create a stateful bean that is aware of the count per exception? Or am I overlooking something simple? I want to make sure that as I approach this refactor I don't start us off on an ugly path.

Using Camel 2.10.1

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2 Answers 2

I checked your case with following test:

import org.apache.camel.EndpointInject;
import org.apache.camel.Exchange;
import org.apache.camel.Produce;
import org.apache.camel.ProducerTemplate;
import org.apache.camel.builder.RouteBuilder;
import org.apache.camel.component.mock.MockEndpoint;
import org.apache.camel.test.junit4.CamelTestSupport;
import org.junit.Test;

import java.util.concurrent.atomic.AtomicLong;

/**
 * @author Illarion Kovalchuk
 *         Date: 12/7/12
 *         Time: 2:58 PM
 */
public class Test extends CamelTestSupport
{

    private static final String MIDDLE_QUEUE = "seda:middle";

    @EndpointInject(uri = "mock:result")
    protected MockEndpoint resultEndpoint;

    @Produce(uri = "direct:start")
    protected ProducerTemplate template;

    private Processor processor = new Processor();

    @Test
    public void shouldRedeliverOnErrors() throws Exception
    {
        resultEndpoint.expectedBodiesReceived("Body");
        template.sendBodyAndHeader(MIDDLE_QUEUE, "Body", "Header", "HV");
        resultEndpoint.assertIsNotSatisfied();
    }

    @Override
    protected RouteBuilder createRouteBuilder()
    {
        return new RouteBuilder()
        {
            @Override
            public void configure() throws Exception
            {

                onException(FooException.class)
                        .redeliveryDelay(2000)
                        .maximumRedeliveries(10);

                onException(BarException.class)
                        .redeliveryDelay(5000)
                        .maximumRedeliveries(2);

                from(MIDDLE_QUEUE)
                        .bean(Processor.class, "process")
                        .to(resultEndpoint)
                        .end();
            }
        };
    }

    public static class Processor
    {
        private static AtomicLong retryState = new AtomicLong(0L);

        public static void process(Exchange e) throws FooException, BarException
        {
            long rs = retryState.getAndAdd(1L);
            if (rs < 4)
            {
                System.err.println("Foo Attempt "+ rs);
                throw new FooException();
            }
            if (rs == 4)
            {
                System.err.println("Bar Attempt "+ rs);
                throw new BarException();
            }
            System.err.println("Normal Attempt "+ rs);
        }
    }

    public static class FooException extends Throwable
    {
    }

    private static class BarException extends Throwable
    {
    }
}

As the result, your concirn was approved: delivery attempts gets exhausted after BarException, even if we have only 4 FooExceptions and 1 BarException.

Unfortunately I can't answer your question fully right now, but I am digging into it and will updated my unswer if get something new.

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Try to replace the order you define your exceptions, e.g.:

<onException>
      <exception>my.exception.BarException</exception>
      <redeliveryPolicy maximumRedeliveries="2" redeliveryDelay="5000"
</onException>

<onException>
     <exception>my.exception.FooException</exception>
     <redeliveryPolicy maximumRedeliveries="10" redeliveryDelay="2000"
</onException>
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If you use Shaman's test case, reordering doesn't seem to change the output. I'll try to test this in the Spring configuration when I get a chance. –  RitterGT Jan 7 '13 at 14:16

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