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I have rather large datasets of metabolite data. Some sets have repetition that is unlabeled (no column indicating repetition). A small example is below.

a<-structure(list(ABBRC = structure(c(1L, 2L, 2L, 3L, 4L, 4L, 4L
        ), .Label = c("X1", "X2", "X3", "X4"), class = "factor"), X = 1:7, 
            Y = 1:7, Year = c(2009L, 2009L, 2009L, 2009L, 2009L, 2009L, 
            2009L)), .Names = c("ABBRC", "X", "Y", "Year"), class = "data.frame", row.names = c(NA, 
        -7L))
        b<-structure(list(ABBRC = structure(c(1L, 2L, 3L, 4L, 4L, 4L, 4L
        ), .Label = c("X1", "X2", "X3", "X4"), class = "factor"), Z = c(1L, 
        2L, 4L, 5L, 6L, 7L, 8L), A = c(1L, 2L, 4L, 5L, 6L, 7L, 8L), Year = c(2009L, 
        2009L, 2009L, 2009L, 2009L, 2009L, 2009L)), .Names = c("ABBRC", 
        "Z", "A", "Year"), class = "data.frame", row.names = c(NA, -7L
        ))
    merge(a,b)
ABBRC Year X Y Z A
1     X1 2009 1 1 1 1
2     X2 2009 2 2 2 2
3     X2 2009 3 3 2 2
4     X3 2009 4 4 4 4
5     X4 2009 5 5 5 5
6     X4 2009 5 5 6 6
7     X4 2009 5 5 7 7
8     X4 2009 5 5 8 8
9     X4 2009 6 6 5 5
10    X4 2009 6 6 6 6
11    X4 2009 6 6 7 7
12    X4 2009 6 6 8 8
13    X4 2009 7 7 5 5
14    X4 2009 7 7 6 6
15    X4 2009 7 7 7 7
16    X4 2009 7 7 8 8

When I merge, combinations of repeated rows are output. This is the expected behavior, but it's not what I would like. I would like for the data to be merged as if they were repetitions (they are). Is there a function to do this sort of merge, or is it easier to label repetitions and then merge? If it's easier to label, what's a good way of doing it?

Desired Output

structure(list(ABBRC = structure(c(1L, 2L, 2L, 3L, 4L, 4L, 4L, 
4L), .Label = c("X1", "X2", "X3", "X4"), class = "factor"), X = c(1L, 
2L, 3L, 4L, 5L, 6L, 7L, NA), Y = c(1L, 2L, 3L, 4L, 5L, 6L, 7L, 
NA), Z = c(1L, 2L, NA, 4L, 5L, 6L, 7L, 8L), A = c(1L, 2L, NA, 
4L, 5L, 6L, 7L, 8L), Year = c(2009L, 2009L, 2009L, 2009L, 2009L, 
2009L, 2009L, 2009L)), .Names = c("ABBRC", "X", "Y", "Z", "A", 
"Year"), class = "data.frame", row.names = c(NA, -8L))
ABBRC  X  Y  Z  A Year
1    X1  1  1  1  1 2009
2    X2  2  2  2  2 2009
3    X2  3  3 NA NA 2009
4    X3  4  4  4  4 2009
5    X4  5  5  5  5 2009
6    X4  6  6  6  6 2009
7    X4  7  7  7  7 2009
8    X4 NA NA  8  8 2009
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2  
I'm having trouble groking what behavior you are after. You're implicitly merging on Year and ABBRC. Is that what you want? Which fields have to match in order for you to consider the row a "duplicate". –  JD Long Dec 3 '12 at 14:29
    
JD, Year is unnecessary in this example, but I will be merging many datasets from different years. Essentially, what I want is in the above edit. I don't mind having an extra column of repetition IDs, but I'm not sure how to get there without a series of confusing loops. –  bhive01 Dec 3 '12 at 14:41

3 Answers 3

Not sure if it's cool to answer your own question, but I figured out how to do it by creating an index variable. Thanks to Hadley for some advice on plyr/seq_along().

require(plyr)
a<-ddply(a, .(ABBRC), transform, rep=seq_along(ABBRC))
b<-ddply(b, .(ABBRC), transform, rep=seq_along(ABBRC))
merge(a,b, all=T)

  ABBRC Year rep  X  Y  Z  A
1    X1 2009   1  1  1  1  1
2    X2 2009   1  2  2  2  2
3    X2 2009   2  3  3 NA NA
4    X3 2009   1  4  4  4  4
5    X4 2009   1  5  5  5  5
6    X4 2009   2  6  6  6  6
7    X4 2009   3  7  7  7  7
8    X4 2009   4 NA NA  8  8
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2  
+1 -- It's totally cool to answer your own questions here. The same approach occurred to me after I had posted my original overly complicated answer, but I ended up using dcast. If you have multiple years, shouldn't your index variable be a combination of "ABBRC" and "Year"? –  Ananda Mahto Dec 3 '12 at 18:58

After deleting my first painful attempt, here's another method, but not as good as your own plyr approach. It involves first generating a dummy time variable.

a$time <- as.numeric(ave(as.character(a$ABBRC), a$ABBRC, a$Year, FUN=seq_along))
b$time <- as.numeric(ave(as.character(b$ABBRC), b$ABBRC, b$Year, FUN=seq_along))
library(reshape2)
ab.long <- rbind(melt(a, id.vars=c("ABBRC", "Year", "time")),
                 melt(b, id.vars=c("ABBRC", "Year", "time")))
dcast(ab.long, ABBRC + Year + time ~ variable)
#   ABBRC Year time  X  Y  Z  A
# 1    X1 2009    1  1  1  1  1
# 2    X2 2009    1  2  2  2  2
# 3    X2 2009    2  3  3 NA NA
# 4    X3 2009    1  4  4  4  4
# 5    X4 2009    1  5  5  5  5
# 6    X4 2009    2  6  6  6  6
# 7    X4 2009    3  7  7  7  7
# 8    X4 2009    4 NA NA  8  8
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I would upvote your response, but I need a better reputation to do so... –  bhive01 Dec 3 '12 at 18:27

There are a few ways to tackle this problem. One method is to identify the duplicates prior to merging

merge(a, b[!duplicatesFromA, ])
#    ABBRC Year X Y Z A
#  1    X4 2009 5 5 8 8
#  2    X4 2009 6 6 8 8
#  3    X4 2009 7 7 8 8

And there are of course several ways to find the duplicates.
Here is one that uses colSums of nested apply loops.

duplicatesFromA <- 
    colSums(apply(b, 1, function(row.b) {
        apply(a, 1, function(row.a) {
            all(row.b==row.a)
        })
    })) > 0 
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