Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

[Winforms .NET 4.0]

I want to be able to call a method and either return a bool or an object. Or anythign that can satisfy my example.

Example:

Method query the database. If the returned row is null i want the calling method to know this in order to call another check method. If the query returns a row with data i should return the data object.

One way i thought is to use the out keyword. Make the method return bool and initialize the returning object prior to calling the method.

After the method runs i could check if true and then manipuate the object...

Is this a good way?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Method query the database. If the returned row is null i want the calling method to know this in order to call another check method.

Why not just return a null reference then? Would you ever want null to mean anything else? (For example, would you ever want to represent that a null value has been found, with a different meaning to the value not being found in the first place?)

share|improve this answer
    
I am silly...Most probably you mean to have the method return the object i want and just make the object = null when i have no data. Correct? –  e4rthdog Dec 3 '12 at 14:38
1  
If the return type is a reference type you can return null as an indicator that no row has been found. Otherwise you can use a Nullable<T> as return type, e.g. Nullable<int> or int? and return null as well. –  Olivier Jacot-Descombes Dec 3 '12 at 14:46
    
@e4rthdog: Yes, exactly. –  Jon Skeet Dec 3 '12 at 14:56

you can use the TryParse idiom of returning a bool and populating an out reference. Another option is returning a tuple.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.