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Suppose I have a list x = [1,2,3] and I want to output every other value than the indexed one, is there a list operation I can use?, ie: x[0]=> [2,3], x[1] => [1,3], x[2] =>[1,2] ?

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7 Answers 7

You could do it with a slice, but I'd be tempted to try:

a = [1, 2, 3]
b = a[:]
del b[1]

edit

The above does "technically" use a slice operation, which happens to be on list objects in effect a shallow-copy.

What's more flexible and shouldn't have any downsides is to use:

a = [1, 2, 3]
b = list(a)
del b[1]

The list builtin works on any iterable (while the slice operation [:] works on lists or those that are indexable) so that you could even extend it to constructs such as:

>>> a = '123'
>>> b = list(a)
>>> del b[0]
>>> ''.join(b)
'23'
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I think this is the most sensible option, to be honest. It's extremely clear what is happening and massively simple. –  Lattyware Dec 3 '12 at 15:43
    
This is technically also using a slice the way you have written it. –  Mark Byers Dec 3 '12 at 15:44
    
@MarkByers You could easily copy the list with list(a) if you wanted (which I actually feel is the nicer method of copying). –  Lattyware Dec 3 '12 at 15:45
    
@Lattyware I'm trying to find it, but I vaguely remember discussions on c.l.p or something, that while list(something) works for arbitrary sequences (which is great) to copy a list is better using something[:] - will post if I find it –  Jon Clements Dec 3 '12 at 15:54
    
@JonClements Yes, it will do as list(something) takes any iterable and produces a list from it, while something[:] requires the iterable is a sequence that supports slicing. Another reason why I'd argue it's a better method of shallow copying. –  Lattyware Dec 3 '12 at 15:55
my_list  = [1, 2, 3]
my_list.remove(my_list[_index_]) #_index_ is the index you want to remove

Such that: my_list.remove(my_list[0]) would yield [2, 3], my_list.remove(my_list[1]) would yield [0, 3], and my_list.remove(my_list[2]) would yield [1, 2].

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Edit: I see now what you are trying to say, this is incorrect if there are duplicate values, and it affects the list in-place. –  Lattyware Dec 3 '12 at 16:28

You could use x[:i] + x[i+1:]:

In [8]: x = [1, 2, 3]

In [9]: i = 0

In [10]: x[:i] + x[i+1:]
Out[10]: [2, 3]

Depending on the context, x.pop(i) might also be useful. It modifies the list in place by removing and returning the i-th element. If you don't need the element, del x[i] is also an option.

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x.pop(i) returns the element, if you don't need that, then just use del x[i]. –  Lattyware Dec 3 '12 at 15:47
    
@Lattyware: Good point, thanks! –  NPE Dec 3 '12 at 15:48

So you want every value except the indexed value: Where i is the index:

>>> list = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8]
>>> [x for x in list if not x == list[i]]

This will give you a list with no instances of the i't element, so e.g.:

>>> i = 2
>>> list = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,1,2,3,4,5,6,7]
>>> [x for x in list if not x == list[i]]
[1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7]

note how 3 is not in that list at all.

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See my comment on the other down-voted answer on this question. –  g.d.d.c Dec 3 '12 at 15:31
    
I updated my answer to reflect the actual intent of the question. –  Jens Timmerman Dec 3 '12 at 15:32
1  
This still isn't right, because it fails when the list has repeated elements. –  Matthew Adams Dec 3 '12 at 15:35
3  
He asked how to exclude an index, not a value. –  g.d.d.c Dec 3 '12 at 15:35
1  
No, it clearly states "every other value than the indexed one" –  Jens Timmerman Dec 3 '12 at 15:36

You could use this:

def exclude(l, e):
  return [v for i, v in enumerate(l) if i != e]

>>> exclude(range(10), 3)
[0, 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
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+1. This might be faster than the slicing methods because it doesn't create and throw away two intermediate lists. Btw, good choice of function name. –  Steven Rumbalski Dec 3 '12 at 15:34
    
@StevenRumbalski - Thanks! The internal variable names are kind of short, but for a quick write-out it seemed OK. –  g.d.d.c Dec 3 '12 at 15:36
1  
Can we use != instead of <> though please :) –  Jon Clements Dec 3 '12 at 15:37
    
@JonClements - Sure, works for me. Sorry, force of habit from SQL days. –  g.d.d.c Dec 3 '12 at 15:38
    
@g.d.d.c It's been removed in 3.x. Anyway, +1, this is a good way of doing it. –  Lattyware Dec 3 '12 at 15:44
>>> x = [1, 2, 3]
>>> x[:1] + x[2:]
[1, 3]
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Every other is

x[::2], start at 0
x[1::2], start at 1
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1  
The question is not "every other" as in step, the question is "all other values except the provided index". –  g.d.d.c Dec 3 '12 at 15:27
1  
I almost posted this answer too haha. –  Matthew Adams Dec 3 '12 at 15:28
1  
My bad, guess I shouldn't answer questions while tending kitchen. –  arynaq Dec 3 '12 at 15:29

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