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I would like to be able to do the following for several classes:

var obj1 = new MyClass { Id = 1 };
var obj2 = new MyClass { Id = 2 };
obj1.Compare(obj2);

I made the following extension method (inspired by a different question inhere):

public static class ObjExt
{
    public static ICollection<string> Compare<T>(this T obj1, T obj2)
    {
        var properties = typeof(T).GetProperties();
        var changes = new List<string>();

        foreach (var pi in properties)
        {
            var value1 = typeof(T).GetProperty(pi.Name).GetValue(obj1, null);
            var value2 = typeof(T).GetProperty(pi.Name).GetValue(obj2, null);

            if (value1 != value2 && (value1 == null || !value1.Equals(value2)))
            {
                changes.Add(string.Format("Value of {0} changed from <{1}> to <{2}>.", pi.Name, value1, value2));
            }
        }
        return changes;
    }

Now, this works if I make a method in all classes I want to compare, so I figured I'd move it so a super class to DRY.

public class MyClass
{
    public int Id { get; set; }

    public ICollection<string> CompareMe<T>(T obj2)
    {
        return Compare<T>(obj2);
    }
}

If I move it to a super class, I get this compile error:

Cannot convert instance type argument 'SuperClass' to 'T'

If I do this in my super class:

return this.Compare<T>(obj2);

I get a compile error saying:

The type arguments for method 'Compare(T, T)' cannot be inferred from the usage. Try specifying the type arguments explicitly.

How to make this generic in a super class?

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3  
Maybe I don't understand, but if you want to move your method into your super class why do you need an extension method? –  Matthew Nichols Dec 3 '12 at 16:06
    
Good question! And a even better solution. I didn't think of this while refactoring. Thank you! –  Nicolai Schlenzig Dec 3 '12 at 16:16
    
Can I upgrade a comment to an answer to mark it solved? –  Nicolai Schlenzig Dec 3 '12 at 16:30
    
Done. Thanks for the offer. –  Matthew Nichols Dec 3 '12 at 17:02
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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This extension method:

public static bool GenericTest<T>(this T obj1, T obj2)
{
}

will not compile, because the compiler has no clue about what T really is: there is no context to infer types from. You either need to use something like where T: SuperClass or change the method parameters to this SuperClass obj1, SuperClass obj2.

share|improve this answer
    
That makes sense, but then SuperClass is the only class being able to use the extension method. I was hoping to make it more generic if possible. Moving the method into SuperClass makes more sense (to me). –  Nicolai Schlenzig Dec 4 '12 at 7:41
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You can add a generic constraint on the SuperTest method:

public bool SuperTest<T>(T obj2) where T: SuperClass
            {
                return this.GenericTest(obj2);
            }

And replace T in the extensionmethod with SuperClass:

public static bool GenericTest(this SuperClass obj1, SuperClass obj2)
        {
            return true;
        }

I'm not sure if this is what you had in mind though.

share|improve this answer
    
I wanted to make it as generic as possible - not using SuperClass in the extension at all. I thought I could do this by introducing a method in SuperClass calling the extension method. –  Nicolai Schlenzig Dec 4 '12 at 7:40
    
I read your updated question and given your reflection-based implementation I don't see why you need the CompareMe method at all. You can remove it and keep everything else. –  Panos Rontogiannis Dec 4 '12 at 11:52
    
That is what I concluded from reading Matthew Nichols comment. However, his answer was removed so I could not mark it solved. –  Nicolai Schlenzig Dec 4 '12 at 13:10
    
Sadly my answer was decided to be off-topic by a moderator even though it solved you problem. –  Matthew Nichols Dec 6 '12 at 23:23
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Not sure how your super class looks. But this compiles fine:

public class SuperClass
{
    public bool GenericTest<T>(T obj2)
    {
       return ObjExt.GenericTest(obj2, obj2);
    }
}

public class MyClass : SuperClass
{
    public int Id { get; set; }

    public bool SuperTest<T>(T obj2)
    {
        return this.GenericTest<T>(obj2);
    }
}

public static class ObjExt
{
    public static bool GenericTest<T>(this T obj1, T obj2)
    {
        return true;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
GenericTest is in a static extension class ObjExt - outside both MyClass and SuperClass. That seems to change the picture. –  Nicolai Schlenzig Dec 3 '12 at 16:12
    
@NicolaiSchlenzig You write I would like to extract it to a super class. So I don't see how this extension method fits into the picture. –  Magnus Dec 3 '12 at 18:16
    
You're right. I thought I could keep my extension method and call it from my super class to avoid redundant code. –  Nicolai Schlenzig Dec 4 '12 at 7:55
    
@NicolaiSchlenzig That can work also, see updated answer. –  Magnus Dec 4 '12 at 8:35
    
The line return ObjExt.GenericTest(obj2, obj2); does not make sense to me. Obj2 twice? I tried putting "this" instead, but then I'm back to the same error :) –  Nicolai Schlenzig Dec 4 '12 at 8:44
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