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Consider The Following case,

   <div id="d1" style="position:relative">
    <div id="d2" style="position:absolute">
     <div id="d3" style="position:absolute">
     </div>
    </div>
   </div>

By Referring the Link,

I Just confirmed that the <div id="d3"> will be relative to the <div id="d2">.
Even if we given position as absolute for <div id="d2">.

Similarly what would it assumes when we place <div>s like below? (relative <div> inside a absolute <div>)

   <div id="d1" style="position:relative">
    <div id="d2" style="position:absolute">
     <div id="d3" style="position:relative">
     </div>
    </div>
   </div>

can anybody explain this.?

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I would assume that it behaves like a relative div inside any other div. What's your question exactly? –  deceze Dec 3 '12 at 16:07
    
d3 must be relative to d2, because the definition says it's an absolute positioning, relative to the first non-static parent. For your second example, there is nothing to assume, it is just a relative positioned div in an absolute positioned div. Nothing special there –  Sven Bieder Dec 3 '12 at 16:11

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You would expect the relative div d3 to maintain position relative to it's parent. See W3 Specification for Css for more information on how things should be positioned.

I emphasise should as there are quirks within individual browsers for the box model that may have an impact on this.

See the JSFiddle Here for a quick demo of this.

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Yes i Got the point. –  Rajaprabhu Aravindasamy Dec 3 '12 at 16:19
    
Which browsers have what quirks about this? I'm not aware of any. –  Rob Dec 3 '12 at 16:20
    
@Rob IE 6/7 are always a special case and may require additional attention - Things like stackoverflow.com/questions/7499538/… –  Kami Dec 3 '12 at 16:26

As @Kami said, div#d3 should be relative to its parent, and is shown here -- I put together a jsFiddle to explain better, and so you can play with different results.

jsFiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/3ezcV/

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Given the html/markup

 <div id="d1" style="position:relative">
  <div id="d2" style="position:absolute">
   <div id="d3" style="position:relative">
   </div>
  </div>
 </div>

div#d1

  • div#d1 will remain in the normal flow of the document.

  • div#d1 has no offset properties (Top, Right, Bottom, Left) and therefore will remain exactly where it is. i.e. it's position will be such as if no position: relative is applied to it.

  • div#d1 wil act as a new positioning context for div#d2.

div#d2

  • div#d2 will be taken out of the normal flow of the document.

  • div#d2 will be positioned relative to div#d1.

div#d3

  • div#d3 will remain in the normal flow of the document but it's flow is determined now by div#d2.

Learn CSS Positioning in Ten Steps

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