Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've got some interest rate data from the US fed website and I'm trying to plot a yield curve. I intend to use this for comparison with a number of others and to stay consistent over time, I'd like to keep the same axis range on the y-axis for as long as possible and for as many countries as possible. The following piece of code scale_y_continuous(limits=c(0,7)) or ylim(0,7) both give errors. Does anyone have any thoughts on what I might be doing wrong? Thanks

library(reshape2)
library(data.tool)
library(ggplot2)

    x =    structure(list(Series.Description = c("2012-07-27", "2012-10-26"
        ), `1.month` = c("0.08", "0.12"), `6.month` = c("0.15", "0.15"
        ), `1.year` = c("0.17", "0.19"), `2.year` = c("0.23", "0.30"), 
            `5.year` = c("0.59", "0.78"), `10.year` = c("1.47", "1.81"
            ), `30.year` = c("2.51", "2.94")), .Names = c("Series.Description", 
        "1.month", "6.month", "1.year", "2.year", "5.year", "10.year", 
        "30.year"), row.names = c(1L, 4L), class = "data.frame")


    # dates as # of days
    z=c(30,182,365,730,1825,3650,10950)
    names(x)[1]="date"
    names(x)[-1]=c(30,182,365,730,1825,3650,10950)
    x=melt(x,id.vars=c(1))
    x$variable=levels(x$variable)[x$variable]
       x$variable=as.numeric(x$variable)

    ggplot(data=x,aes(x=variable,y=value,group=date,linetype=date)) + 
      geom_line(colour="red") + geom_point(colour="red") + 
      scale_x_continuous(breaks=z,labels=c("1M","6M","1Y","2Y","3Y","5Y","10Y")) +
      scale_linetype_manual(values=c(2,1)) + 
      scale_y_continuous(limits=c(0,7))
share|improve this question
    
What package(s) are you using for month, an and melt? –  BenBarnes Dec 3 '12 at 16:28
    
Hi @BenBarnes, apologies. an is my own function to contract as.numeric, month is from data.table and melt is from reshape2 –  Tahnoon Pasha Dec 3 '12 at 16:32
    
Would be good to have your library() statements included with the code and your x defined first instead of last, then we can just copy and paste your code. Is sfact one of your own functions as well? –  SlowLearner Dec 3 '12 at 16:33
    
hi @SlowLearner embarassingly yes. I've edited the code and included the library statement too. –  Tahnoon Pasha Dec 3 '12 at 16:37
    
Sorry Tahnoon, my comment was not clear enough. What I meant was that it helps if you can include the library(ggplot2), library(reshape) etc statements at the top of your code. Then all the necessary libraries will be loaded and we don't have to look at the code to figure out which ones are needed. It's pretty obvious for ggplot but as you can see from BenBarnes' comment, not so obvious for something like month. I assume lubridate but... –  SlowLearner Dec 3 '12 at 16:43
show 3 more comments

1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you do str(x) you will see what is going on.

> str(x)
'data.frame':   14 obs. of  3 variables:
 $ date    : chr  "2012-07-27" "2012-10-26" "2012-07-27" "2012-10-26" ...
 $ variable: num  30 30 182 182 365 ...
 $ value   : chr  "0.08" "0.12" "0.15" "0.15" ...

value is a character, not a number as mnel states in his comment. So if you change the value column to a numeric data type it should at least plot. Whether it gives the output you wish is another issue. The code below seems to work for me.

library(reshape2)
library(ggplot2)

x =    structure(list(Series.Description = c("2012-07-27", "2012-10-26"
    ), `1.month` = c("0.08", "0.12"), `6.month` = c("0.15", "0.15"
    ), `1.year` = c("0.17", "0.19"), `2.year` = c("0.23", "0.30"),
        `5.year` = c("0.59", "0.78"), `10.year` = c("1.47", "1.81"
        ), `30.year` = c("2.51", "2.94")), .Names = c("Series.Description",
    "1.month", "6.month", "1.year", "2.year", "5.year", "10.year",
    "30.year"), row.names = c(1L, 4L), class = "data.frame")


# dates as # of days
z=c(30,182,365,730,1825,3650,10950)
names(x)[1]="date"
names(x)[-1]=c(30,182,365,730,1825,3650,10950)
x=melt(x,id.vars=c(1))
x$variable=levels(x$variable)[x$variable]
   x$variable=as.numeric(x$variable)
x$value <- as.numeric(x$value)

ggplot(data=x,aes(x=variable,y=value,group=date,linetype=date)) +
  geom_line(colour="red") + geom_point(colour="red") +
  scale_x_continuous(breaks=z,labels=c("1M","6M","1Y","2Y","3Y","5Y","10Y")) +
  scale_linetype_manual(values=c(2,1)) +
  scale_y_continuous(limits=c(0,7))

If you actually just want labels at regular intervals along the x-axis, you should probably try changing the scale_x_continuous to scale_x_discrete and removing the bit where you fiddle with x$variable:

x <- structure(list(Series.Description = c("2012-07-27", "2012-10-26"
    ), `1.month` = c("0.08", "0.12"), `6.month` = c("0.15", "0.15"
    ), `1.year` = c("0.17", "0.19"), `2.year` = c("0.23", "0.30"),
        `5.year` = c("0.59", "0.78"), `10.year` = c("1.47", "1.81"
        ), `30.year` = c("2.51", "2.94")), .Names = c("Series.Description",
    "1.month", "6.month", "1.year", "2.year", "5.year", "10.year",
    "30.year"), row.names = c(1L, 4L), class = "data.frame")


# dates as # of days
z <- c(30,182,365,730,1825,3650,10950)
names(x)[1] <- "date"
names(x)[-1] <- c(30,182,365,730,1825,3650,10950)
x <- melt(x, id.vars = c(1))
#x$variable=levels(x$variable)[x$variable]
#   x$variable=as.numeric(x$variable)
x$value <- as.numeric(x$value)

ggplot(data = x, aes(x = variable, y = value, group = date, linetype = date)) +
  geom_line(colour = "red") + geom_point(colour = "red") +
  scale_x_discrete(breaks = z, labels = c("1M","6M","1Y","2Y","3Y","5Y","10Y")) +
  scale_linetype_manual(values = c(2,1)) +
  scale_y_continuous(limits = c(0,7))

This gives the following output:

plot

To digress slightly, may I point out that this seems to have been a very simple problem but it hasn't been answered because you made it hard to answer. Why was it hard to answer?

  1. You didn't include the library(ggplot) and other calls at the top.
  2. You included functions that weren't defined in the initial code.
  3. You defined structures after the code instead of before.
  4. You didn't report the error message itself, which would have been useful.

All of this meant that people were copying and pasting into a copy of your code into their R installations and it was failing in multiple ways before they got a chance to see the problem you were experiencing. People here are interested in fixing problems with your code, but they don't want to mess around with issues like the ones outlined above.

On the other hand, if you make it easy for people to help, they will help. So look at your code carefully before posting, copy it, open a new R session, paste it in and see if it works up to the error you have experienced. If it does, great, go ahead and post a question. If not, clean up your code and try again. This is advice from another beginner who has posted a number of not-very-good questions on SO. The fact that you did try to put together a minimal reproducible example suggests that you are keen to get it right, but probably need to do a bit more thinking before posting. This is a great question to revisit.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks @SlowLearner appreciate the answer and will follow up with the question on the link –  Tahnoon Pasha Dec 5 '12 at 2:43
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.