Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I wrote the following function:

x    <- 1:4
y    <- c(1,2,7,4)
mydf <- data.frame(a=x,b=x,c=x,d=x,y=y)

practice  <-  function(x) if( x[1] == x[5]) {

             foo <- (x[2])
             return(foo)

              } else {

              bar     <- x[3] + x[4]                
              foobar <- x[2] - bar

               return(foobar)
              }       

newmydf <- apply( mydf, 1, practice)

this works fine on the data.frame provided. However I have another data.frame and I keep getting

Error in x[3] + x[4] : non-numeric argument to binary operator

despite the following str()

'data.frame':   133 obs. of  19 variables:
 $  : chr   ...
 $ : int   ...
 $ : int  ...
 $ : int  ...
 $ : int   ...
 $ : int   ...
 $ : int   ...
 $ : int   ...
 $ : int  ...
 $ : int  ...
 $ : int   ...
 $ : int   ...
 $ : int  ...
 $ : int  ...
 $ : int   ...
 $ : int  ...
 $ : num  ...
 $ : int  
 $ : int  

What possible little slip ups can I be making? I have started with a new session and I still get the same issue.

share|improve this question
    
Can you post the output of dput(head(mydf)) (or whatever the name of your data frame that's not working is?) –  David Robinson Dec 3 '12 at 16:27
    
If you send the data frame you've shown through apply, you will convert each row to a character vector because of the first column. Instead, run it with apply(mydf[, 2:length(mydf)], 1, practice). –  Justin Dec 3 '12 at 16:32
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The values in the first column of second data frame are of type "character". As a result, the command apply turns the whole data frame into a character matrix. The operator + is not defined for character values.

There are two possible solutions:

  1. Transform the first column to type numeric (if possible):

    mydf[ , 1] <- as.numeric(mydf[ , 1])
    
  2. Do not use the first column of the data frame:

    apply(mydf[ , -1], 1, practice)
    
share|improve this answer
    
Even better would probably be to turn the first column into rownames, usually the right choice for a data frame where every column except one is numeric. That would let you keep the column. –  David Robinson Dec 3 '12 at 16:34
    
wow I have used apply so many times and I never new that it. Thats a kicker. Thank you very much. –  user1320502 Dec 3 '12 at 16:36
add comment

Another solution would be to use by:

# Put in a character to mydf to test
mydf$foo<-'a'
# Run by
by(mydf,seq(nrow(mydf)),practice)
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for a nice by alternative –  user1320502 Dec 3 '12 at 16:48
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.