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Update: This was fixed in iOS 6.1 DP3 SDK.

I've tracked down a use-after-deallocated crash when building with ARC using the default release build configuration (debug seems to work fine). The problem occurs when creating an object inside an if-scope with a non-constant condition, assigning it to a variable from outside the scope and then only referencing the variable using Objective-C array or dictionary literals.

Here is the smallest reproducible case I've managed to find:

void test(BOOL arg)
{
    id obj = nil;

    if (arg) {
        obj = [NSObject new];
    }

    // obj already deallocated here
    @[obj];

    // but using NSArray works
    //[NSArray arrayWithObject:obj];

    // @[obj] works if obj is referenced i.e. by NSLog print out
    //NSLog(@"%@", obj);
}

int main(int argc, const char * argv[])
{
    @autoreleasepool {
        test(YES);
    }
    return 0;
}

When I build and run this with zombie objects enabled I get this error message:

-[NSObject retain]: message sent to deallocated instance 0x100109100

As I commented in the code it works fine if obj is referenced in some other way, like with NSLog or using NSArray instead. Have I misunderstood how objects are released with ARC and scopes or is this a optimization bug in LLVM or Clang?

I'm using Xcode 4.5.2 with clang version 4.1 (tags/Apple/clang-421.11.66) (based on LLVM 3.1svn). I can reproduce it when building for x86 64 bit for iOS simulator and Mac OS X and I'm quite sure the same problem occurs when building for ARM as the issue was first found when running release build on an iPhone.

I have filed and bug report to Apple and created an open radar report.

What, if anything, am I missing?

Update, did some more experiments:

As Gabro pointed out the compiler translates @[] to a [NSArray arrayWithObjects:count:] statement so I did some tests:

// works
id a[] = {obj};
[NSArray arrayWithObjects:a count:1];

// does not work
const id *b = (id[]){obj};
[NSArray arrayWithObjects:b count:1];

// does not work
[NSArray arrayWithObjects:(id[]){obj} count:1];

So my guess is that this happens when combining ARC and anonymous C arrays.

share|improve this question
    
+1 for posting a SSCCE –  Jan Dvorak Dec 3 '12 at 16:32
1  
according to Apple when you use the array literal, the compiler generates the following id objects[] = { obj }; NSUInteger count = sizeof(objects) / sizeof(id); [NSArray arrayWithObjects:objects count:count]; I wonder whether is there a bug due to going through play C arrays –  Gabriele Petronella Dec 3 '12 at 16:42
1  
Very odd. I'd call it a bug. I looked at the disassembly of the @[obj] and the [NSArray arrayWithObject:obj] variant for x86_64 with -Os optimization under LLVM 4.1; and the compiler inserts a call obj_release on obj before the NSArray. Unless someone smarter than I chimes in, I'd call it a bug. –  NSBum Dec 3 '12 at 16:56
    
It's the new array literal syntax that was introduced with clang 3.1 take a look at clang.llvm.org/docs/ObjectiveCLiterals.html –  Mattias Wadman Dec 3 '12 at 17:09
    
I was suspicious about whether it was dependent on you not using the result of the @[obj] expression but I see by testing that fixing that doesn't change anything. –  Phillip Mills Dec 3 '12 at 17:27

2 Answers 2

You're not missing anything. It's a compiler bug.

share|improve this answer

I just tested the following code both building for OSX (x86 64) and iOS Simulator and I cannot reproduce the bug

 void test(BOOL arg) {
     id obj = nil;

    if (arg) {
        obj = [NSObject new];
    }
    @[obj];
    NSLog(@"Hi there");
}

int main(int argc, const char * argv[]) {
    @autoreleasepool {
        test(YES);
    }
    return 0;
}

The above code simply prints Hi there in the console and returns.

My configuration is the same of yours: XCode 4.5.2 and Apple clang version 4.1 (tags/Apple/clang-421.11.66) (based on LLVM 3.1svn) as a compiler.

EDIT

I also tried to compile from command line (after adding #include <Foundation/Foundation.h> at the beginning of the above example) using

clang -fobjc-arc -framework Foundation main.m

And the result was again

2012-12-03 12:47:45.647 a.out[39421:707] Hi there

EDIT 2 As pointed out in the comments it is possible to reproduce the bug increasing the optimization level over -O0. Summarizing:

clang -O0 -fobjc-arc -framework Foundation main.m

the program works as expected

clang -O1 -fobjc-arc -framework Foundation main.m

the bug presented in the question shows up. This is true with any optimization level over -O0

It's definitely a bug in the compiler.

share|improve this answer
    
That's weird. And you are sure your compiling with ARC? –  Mattias Wadman Dec 3 '12 at 19:02
1  
What optimization level? I can reproduce the OP's issue with any optimization level above -O0. With no optimizations, the compiler appears not to over-release obj - otherwise it does. –  NSBum Dec 3 '12 at 19:02
    
Ah sorry now i see -fobj-arc. Yepp your example works for me also but if I add -Os as the default iOS release build configuration does it seems to over release. –  Mattias Wadman Dec 3 '12 at 19:13
    
confirmed, if you increase the optimization level above -O0 it causes a segmentation fault. I'll edit my answer –  Gabriele Petronella Dec 3 '12 at 19:48

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