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Is there a way to make JSON generated string keep attribute names? From this model:

class Person
    attr_accessor :name

    def self.json_create(o)
       new(*o['data'])
    end

    def to_json(*a)
       { 'json_class' => self.class.name, 'data' => [name] }.to_json(*a)
   end 
end

JSON generates this string:

{
    "json_class": "Person",
    "data": ["John"]
}

but I wanted a string like this:

{
    "json_class": "Person",
    "data":
    {
        "name" : "John"
    }
}

Is there a way to do it and still be able to access attributes by its name? Like:

person.name
share|improve this question
    
Yes, you're right. I have edited it already, so now its OK. mikhailvs thanks for the help. –  user1038176 Dec 3 '12 at 17:03

1 Answer 1

You could pass the complete attributes instead of specifying 'name':

def to_json(*a)
  { 'json_class' => self.class.name, 'data' => attributes }.to_json(*a)
end 

If you want filter to specific attributes, you can do this:

def to_json(*a)
  attrs_to_use = attributes.select{|k,v| %[name other].include?(k) }
  { 'json_class' => self.class.name, 'data' => attrs_to_use }.to_json(*a)
end 

And if you just want to use 'name', then write it out :)

def to_json(*a)
  { 'json_class' => self.class.name, 'data' => {:name => name} }.to_json(*a)
end 

UPDATE

To clarify how one might make an initializer to handle all attributes, you can do something like this:

class Person
  attr_accessor :name, :other

  def initialize(object_attribute_hash = {})
    object_attribute_hash.each do |k, v| 
      public_send("#{k}=", v) if attribute_names.include?(k)
    end
  end

  def attribute_names
    %[name other] # modify this to include all publicly assignable attributes
  end

  def attributes
    attribute_names.inject({}){|m, attr| m[attr] = send(attr); m}
  end

  def self.json_create(o)
    new(o['data'])
  end

  def to_json(*a)
    { 'json_class' => self.class.name, 'data' => attributes }.to_json(*a)
  end 
end
share|improve this answer
    
OK. But when I parse it back to assemble the Person object and try to access the name attribute that's what I get: p = JSON.parse(json_str) puts p.name name John I wanted it to output just the value string not both. Why's that happening? –  user1038176 Dec 3 '12 at 17:15
    
I guess this way, the attribute "name" becomes an array ["name", "John"] when parsed back from JSON string. What am I missing? –  user1038176 Dec 3 '12 at 17:26
    
Your json_create method is 'splatting' the data hash into an array of arrays using new(*o['data']). Leave out the asterisk to avoid this: new(o['data']) –  PinnyM Dec 3 '12 at 17:29
    
Well, now it seems that p.name is a hash {"name" => "John"}. That's awkward... Still not getting what I want. Thanks though :) –  user1038176 Dec 3 '12 at 17:37
    
Ok, so change your json_create method to: new(o['data']['name'] –  PinnyM Dec 3 '12 at 18:28

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