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Suppose an Interface I has two methods. For example Method1() and Method2().

A class A Implements an Interface I.

Is it possible for class A to implement only Method1() and ignore Method2()?

I know as per rule class A has to write implementation of both methods. I am asking if there any way to violate this rule?

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Perhaps you should have two interface, one with one method and one that extends it and adds another method. A common example is IRead with Read and IReadWrite : IRead that adds Write. –  Servy Dec 3 '12 at 17:18
    
@Servy I agree with your point but what if you don't have rights to alter interface ? OR When this interface is in a third party DLL ? –  Mazhar Khan Dec 3 '12 at 17:29
    
Why are you asking me the question, you're the OP. Either this is in a 3rd party DLL or it's not, you tell me which. If it is in a 3rd party then how do you know that the second method doesn't need to be implemented? Do you just want to defer implementing the second method until later? If so, go with an abstract class, if not, do you want it to do nothing, have an implementation but not be able to be called directly through the class, what should happen when the object is cast to the interface and calls that method? –  Servy Dec 3 '12 at 17:30
    
I am sorry @Servy if you disliked my comment. –  Mazhar Khan Dec 3 '12 at 17:34
    
I'm not saying I dislike it, I'm asking you to provide additional information about what you want to get as an answer. Apologizing is far less helpful than just providing the requested information. You should know what your actual problem is since you're the one asking the question. I don't know more about your requirements than you do. –  Servy Dec 3 '12 at 17:38
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5 Answers

You can avoid implementing it (a valid scenario) but not ignore it altogether (a questionable scenario).

public interface IFoo
{
    void A();
    void B();
}

// This abstract class doesn't know what to do with B(), so it puts
// the onus on subclasses to perform the implementation.
public abstract class Bar : IFoo
{
    public void A() { }
    public abstract void B();
}
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You must implement all methods of the interfaces your class inherits from. There is no way around that. But you can use explicit interface implementation to hide the method.

That way a user doesn't see the method on a variable that has the class as type, but when he casts to the interface he can call the method.

class A : I
{
  void I.Method2()
  {
    throw new NotSupportedException();
  }
}

then

A a;
a.Method2(); //doesn't compile
I i = a;
i.Method2(); //works

If the class A is only an abstract base class, you can also use an abstract method to implement the interface, leaving the concrete implementation to the derived classes.

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No, there's no such concept in C# of optional interface members. If A implements I, then it must provide some implementation for all of I's members, even if the implementation does nothing or only throw an exception.

public class A : I
{
    public void Method1()
    {
        // Do nothing.
    }

    public void Method2()
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }
}

From a design perspective, why would you want to do this anyway in a statically typed language? Furthermore, why not just have two interfaces?

public interface I1 { void Method1(); }

public interface I2 { void Method2(); }

With your interfaces coded like this, you can have classes that implement one interface or the other, or both, or neither. To me, this makes more sense anyway.

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No, there's not.

But you can code :

public void Method2(){
    throw new NotImplementedException();
}

That will inform the application that this method cannot be called from this instance.

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It may make sense, in certain contexts, for the body of the method to just be empty and do nothing, rather than throwing. –  Servy Dec 3 '12 at 17:31
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Yes if I was a class, but No if it's an interface.

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