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I have a table that uses two identifying columns, let's call them id and userid. ID is unique in every record, and userid is unique to the user but is in many records.

What I need to do is get a record for the User by userid and then join that record to the first record we have for the user. The logic of the query is as follows:

SELECT v1.id, MIN(v2.id) AS entryid, v1.userid
FROM views v1
INNER JOIN views v2
  ON v1.userid = v2.userid

I'm hoping that I don't have to join the table to a subquery that handles the min() piece of the code as that seems to be quite slow.

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Do you have an index on the userid column? –  Michael Dunlap Dec 3 '12 at 17:27
    
Or a compound index on UserId and Id? Is Id the PK for the row? –  Chris Gill Dec 3 '12 at 17:28
    
Because you should do a subquery and it shouldn't be that slow. If you can change the data structures you could always add a column for the first record for a user and maintain that in the code, or maintain a different table if this is going to be too slow... –  Chris Gill Dec 3 '12 at 17:29
    
ID is a PK currently and I have indexes setup across the userid and is columns. The database table is currently at ~5,000,000 rows. –  Dave Long Dec 3 '12 at 17:29
    
Is that your full query? I think I'm missing why you need a join at all. –  MikeSmithDev Dec 3 '12 at 17:29
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3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I guess (it's not entirely clear) you want to find for every user, the rows of the table that have minimum id, so one row per user.

In that case, you an use a subquery (a derived table) and join it to the table:

SELECT v.*
FROM views AS v
  JOIN
    ( SELECT userid, MIN(id) AS entryid
      FROM views
      GROUP BY userid
    ) AS vm
    ON  vm.userid = v.userid 
    AND vm.entryid = v.id ;

The above can also be written using a Common Table Expression (CTE), if you like them:

; WITH vm AS
    ( SELECT userid, MIN(id) AS entryid
      FROM views
      GROUP BY userid
    )
  SELECT v.*
  FROM views AS v
    JOIN vm
      ON  vm.userid = v.userid 
      AND vm.entryid = v.id ;

Both would be quite efficient with an index on (userid, id).

With SQL-Server, you could write this using the ROW_NUMBER() window function:

; WITH viewsRN AS
    ( SELECT *
           , ROW_NUMBER() OVER (PARTITION BY userid ORDER BY id) AS rn
      FROM views
    ) 
  SELECT *                      --- skipping the "rn" column
  FROM viewsRN
  WHERE rn = 1 ;
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Thank you. The CTE was a huge help! –  Dave Long Dec 3 '12 at 19:59
    
Check also the last query (I had an error, it's fixed now). Window functions are very helpful. –  ypercube Dec 3 '12 at 20:07
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Well, to use the MIN function along with non-aggregate columns, you'd have to group the statement. That's possible with the query you have... (EDIT based on additional info)

SELECT MIN(v2.id) AS entryid, v1.id, v1.userid
FROM views v1
INNER JOIN views v2
  ON v1.userid = v2.userid      
GROUP BY v1.id, v1.userid

... however if this is just a simple example and you're looking to pull more data with this query, it quickly becomes an unfeasible solution.

What you seem to want is a list of all the user data in this view, with a link on each row leading back to the "first" record that exists for the same user. The above query will get you what you want, but there are much easier ways to determine the first record for each user:

SELECT v1.id, v1.userid
FROM views v1
ORDER BY v1.userid, v1.id

The first record for each unique user is your "entry point". I think I understand why you want to do it the way you specified, and the first query I gave will be reasonably performant, but you'll have to consider whether not having to use the order by clause to get the correct answer is worth it.

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+1 agreed... but my take is currently it looks like he just needs SELECT MAX(id), MIN(id), userId FROM views GROUP BY userId... but without more info on query/expected result... IDK. I suspect tho that he needs what you provided because there is more data needed. –  MikeSmithDev Dec 3 '12 at 17:34
    
I actually want a multitude of rows in the result object, but this gives me what I want in the result. One instance that this doesn't seem to work in, is what about when the query is for the "entry view" meaning where v1.id and v2.id are the same. Right now that query will not have a record in the result for it. I assume I can do a right join and is min(v2.id) is null use the v1.id in both columns? –  Dave Long Dec 3 '12 at 17:38
    
@MikeSmithDev - I think I get it now; he wants a query that will give him all the rows associated with a user, and also wants to know the ID of the first such record for that user, which is of special significance. Personally I think this purpose would be better served with an ORDER BY v1.id clause (then the first result is your "entry"), but if he's crafting an object-mapping statement with a backreference this might simplify things. –  KeithS Dec 3 '12 at 17:43
    
@DaveLong - I didn't quite understand what you wanted. I think I do now. I have edited the statement and a more comprehensive edit will follow. –  KeithS Dec 3 '12 at 17:47
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edit-1: as pointed out in the comments, this solution also uses a sub-query. However, it does not use aggregate functions, which (depending on the database) might have a huge impact on the performance.


Can achieve without sub-query (see below). Obviously, an index on views.userid is of tremedous value for the performance.

SELECT      v1.*
FROM        views v1
WHERE       v1.id = (
        SELECT  TOP 1 v2.id
        FROM    views v2
        WHERE   v2.userid = v1.userid
        ORDER BY v2.id ASC
    )
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This is without subquery? –  ypercube Dec 3 '12 at 17:40
    
... You're using a subquery. –  KeithS Dec 3 '12 at 17:45
1  
Fair enough, guys. It does use a sub-query, just not the one that uses aggregates (I will not correct the text so that your comments stay valid). However, this solution scales much better compared to joins on MAX/MIN, because indices can be used. –  van Dec 4 '12 at 8:29
    
I haven't downvoted, because this is another rewriting of the wanted query. Efficiency should be checked and of course may vary depending on the DBMS and the data sizes and distributions. –  ypercube Dec 4 '12 at 10:46
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