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can someone explain why the parent class destructor is being called twice? I was under the impression that a child class could only call a parent's destructor by using: parent::__destruct()

class test {

    public $test1 = "this is a test of a pulic property";
    private $test2 = "this is a test of a private property";
    protected $test3 = "this is a test of a protected property";
    const hello = 900000;

    function __construct($h){
        //echo 'this is the constructor test '.$h;
    }

    function x($x2){
        echo ' this is fn x'.$x2;
    }
    function y(){
        print "this is fn y";
    }

    function __destruct(){
        echo '<br>now calling the destructor<br>';
    }
}

class hey extends test {

    function hey(){
        $this->x('<br>from the host with the most');
        echo ' <br>from hey class'.$this->test3;
    }
}

$obj = new test("this is an \"arg\" sent to instance of test");
$obj2 = new hey();
echo $obj2::hello;
/*
 the result:
 this is fn x
 from the host with the most 
 from hey classthis is a test of a protected property900000
 now calling the destructor

 now calling the destructor
 */
share|improve this question
    
It seems you are trying to access in hey a private variable from test class –  Leandro Barreto Dec 3 '12 at 17:32
    
$test3 is protected which means hey class inherited it –  zero Dec 3 '12 at 18:08

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This only applies if the __destruct method is overridden in the child. For example:

//parent
public function __destruct() {
   echo 'goodbye from parent';
}
//child
public function __destruct() {
   echo 'goodbye from child';
}

... will output:

goodbye from parentgoodbye from child

However, this:

//child
public function __destruct() {
   echo parent::__destruct() . "\n";
   echo 'goodbye from child';
}

Will output:

goodbye from parent
goodbye from child

If you do not override, it calls the parent destructor implicitly.

share|improve this answer
    
seems like a bug, because the php docs say that the destructor works just like the constructor in that they are not called by the child unless the child uses "parent::" php.net/manual/en/language.oop5.decon.php and it's true the parent constructor is not called by the inheriting child in my example but the destructor seems to ignore what the docs say –  zero Dec 3 '12 at 17:39
    
@zero no, it only applies if the method is overridden. The above applies to the __constructor as well: "Parent constructors are not called implicitly if the child class defines a constructor." –  Explosion Pills Dec 3 '12 at 17:40
    
yeah you're right, seems strange though. is it like that in most other oop style languages or is that a php thing? –  zero Dec 3 '12 at 17:44
    
@zero I'm not sure -- Java has no destructors and its constructors sort of work the same way, but in Java you are required to call the equivalent of parent::__construct –  Explosion Pills Dec 3 '12 at 17:50

Your hey class inherits the __destruct method from its parent. So, when the test object is destroyed, it is called, and when the hey object is destroyed, it is called again.

Consider this change:

class hey extends test{
    function hey(){
        $this->x('<br>from the host with the most');
        echo ' <br>from hey class'.$this->test3;
    }

    function __destruct(){
    }
}

Then, your destruct message will only output once.

Sample (your code): http://codepad.org/3QnRCFsf

Sample (changed code): http://codepad.org/fj3M1IuO

share|improve this answer
$obj = new test("this is an \"arg\" sent to instance of test");
$obj2 = new hey();

You have two objects being created here. Both of which will destruct at the end of your script.

Since class hey doesn't define a destruct method it calls to the parent class for a destruct. If you define a destruct in the child class and run your code you'll notice that it no longer hits the parent.

But you're still seeing the test destruct because you're creating an object of type test in the line $obj = new test("this is an \"arg\" sent to instance of test");.

share|improve this answer

Its only an impression ....

The PHP DOC On Destructor

Like constructors, parent destructors will not be called implicitly by the engine. In order to run a parent destructor, one would have to explicitly call parent::__destruct() in the destructor body.

The destructor will be called even if script execution is stopped using exit(). Calling exit() in a destructor will prevent the remaining shutdown routines from executing.

if you don't what then you need to overwrite it

Example

class test {
    function __destruct() {
        var_dump(__CLASS__);
    }
}
class hey extends test {

    function __destruct() {   // <------ over write it 
    }
}
$obj = new test();
$obj2 = new hey();
share|improve this answer

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