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How do I get the lowest matched group no in a regular expression?

Suppose there is a regular expression

/(a(b))|(b(1))|(c(4))/...

e.g input string is "b1" , the lowest matched group no 2. ($2)

e.g input string is "c4" , the lowest matched group no 5. ($5)

e.g input string is "ab" , the lowest matched group no 1. ($1)

I have one solution but it is not very efficient. Thakns all for trying. The real problem is efficiency. Many have provided similar solutions I found. The problem is linear time searching for the lowest group. O(N) where n is number of capture groups. I wondered if there is a faster way. O(1) That was the aim of this question. I expected the Perl has a hidden feature to get that value. I guess there is not.

Meanwhile I found the solution myself, here it is..

/(a(b)(??{ $first=1;"" }))|(b(1)(??{ $first=2;"" }))|(c(4)(??{ $first=5;"" }))/

The time to find out $first is O(1).

if (@matches = $conv::content =~/$conv::trtree{convertsourceregqr}[$conversionno]/)
      {

        my $firstno;
        my $c = 0;
        for my $m (@matches)
        {
          if (defined $m)
          {
            $firstno=$c;
            last;
          }
          $c++;
        }**strong text****strong text**
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3  
What do you mean by lowest matched group? –  M42 Dec 3 '12 at 18:13
    
code blocks in regexes are experimental. I have added an update to my answer and depending on your use case, either it ((?|)) or named captures should do what you need without fear of using experimental features. –  Joel Berger Dec 10 '12 at 19:05

5 Answers 5

The group numbering in a regular expression is the number of parens.

 1 2    3 4    5 6
/(a(b))|(b(1))|(c(4))/

A quick script to demonstrate this:

#!/usr/bin/perl

foreach my $v ('ab', 'b1', 'c4') {
    $v =~ /(a(b))|(b(1))|(c(4))/;
    if(defined $1) { print "One!\n"; }
    if(defined $3) { print "Three!\n"; }
    if(defined $5) { print "Five!\n"; }
    print << "--EOB--";
$v
1 $1
2 $2
3 $3
4 $4
5 $5
6 $6

--EOB--
}

Which produces the output:

One!
ab
1 ab
2 b
3 
4 
5 
6 

Three!
b1
1 
2 
3 b1
4 1
5 
6 

Five!
c4
1 
2 
3 
4 
5 c4
6 4

At this point, one should be able to easily modify the code to do whatever for whichever group is matched.

share|improve this answer

Store the matches in an array, and find the index of the first defined value:

my $str = 'c4';
my @matches = ( $str =~ m/(a(b))|(b(1))|(c(4))/ );
for my $i ( 0..$#matches ) {
    if ( defined $matches[$i] ) {
        printf "First matching group: %d\n", $i+1;
        last;
    }
}
# output: 5

Note that this will never output 2, 4 or 6 since groups 1, 3 or 5 must match for one of them to match.

If you only want the content of the first matching group:

use List::Util 'first';
my $str = 'c4';
print first { defined } $str =~ m/(a(b))|(b(1))|(c(4))/;
share|improve this answer

The special variables @- and @+ hold the starting and ending positions of successful matches. The practical application to your question is that if $<n> holds some value (for $<n> in $1, $2, etc.), then $+[<n>] will be larger than $-[<n>].

for ('b1', 'c4', 'ab') {

    /(a(b))|(b(1))|(c(4))/;
    my @i = grep { $+[$_] > $-[$_] } 1..$#+;

    # @i contains list of successful matches,
    # i.e., if @i == (3,4), then $3 and $4 contain values
    if (@i > 0) {
        print "Earliest match for '$_' is: \$$i[0]\n";
    } else {
        print "No match for '$_'\n";
    }
}
share|improve this answer

This doesn't specifically match your question, but it might address your actual problem (or else a future reader's).

Edit (12/10/12):

One more option, the special construct (?|) will reorganize the numbering in alternations, so that the numbers will be consistent. This won't help identify which group matched, but will assure you that the matches are in $1 and $2. If you need to know which matched, named captures (below) are the way to go.

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;

foreach my $v ('ab', 'b1', 'c4') {
  print "Input: $v\n";
  next unless $v =~ /(?|(a(b))|(b(1))|(c(4)))/;
  print "$1 => $2\n";
}

Original Perhaps you want to use named captures to ease the burden of understanding what matched. The named capture results are placed in the %+ hash and are thus much easier to introspect.

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;

foreach my $v ('ab', 'b1', 'c4') {
  print "Input: $v\n";
  next unless $v =~ /(?<a>a(?<ab>b))|(?<b>b(?<b1>1))|(?<c>c(?<c4>4))/;
  foreach my $key (sort keys %+) {
    next unless defined $+{$key};
    print "\t$key => $+{$key}\n";
  }
}

prints

Input: ab
    a => ab
    ab => b
Input: b1
    b => b1
    b1 => 1
Input: c4
    c => c4
    c4 => 4

EDIT

In fact, for alternations like this, perhaps you want to simply use recurring names!

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;

foreach my $v ('ab', 'b1', 'c4') {
  print "Input: $v\n";
  next unless $v =~ /(?<outer>a(?<inner>b))|(?<outer>b(?<inner>1))|(?<outer>c(?<inner>4))/;
  print "\touter => $+{outer}\n";
  print "\tinner => $+{inner}\n";
}

prints

Input: ab
    outer => ab
    inner => b
Input: b1
    outer => b1
    inner => 1
Input: c4
    outer => c4
    inner => 4
share|improve this answer

First off, using parentheses that way is confusing. The simplest solution to this particular problem is to just use one:

/(ab|b1|c4)/

Since the other parentheses do not serve a purpose in this particular case, this will work.

However, there may be times when grouping is needed, in which case you can use non-capturing parentheses and just use one to capture, (?: ... ). In your case it would look like this:

/((?:a(?:b))|(?:b(?:1))|(?:c(?:4)))/
share|improve this answer
    
confusing it may be, I use parentheses to determine what was matched. Otherwise, I would not use them. –  Aftershock Dec 4 '12 at 10:28
    
@Aftershock Well, in that case, I would recommend using separate regexes. It will be easier to read, and it will be easier to maintain and probably less prone to bugs. If you need to determine what was matched, it is a simple matter of looking it up afterwards. This is in my opinion an awkward and unstable solution. –  TLP Dec 4 '12 at 18:08
    
regex is automatically generated from a set of strings. True it is ugly but I guess it is faster in this way because of regular expression optimisations. –  Aftershock Dec 4 '12 at 18:34

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