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I am writing application on image comparison using OpenCV library. I am using basic block matching method

How can I extract number of bits in each block

Consider this is an image

16x16 pixels

--------------
+            +
+            +
+            +
+------------+

With block size = 8x8 pixels

--------------
+      |     +
+------------+
+      |     +
+------------+

My program:

1)reads two images
2)converts them to the grey scale
3)divide the images into amount of blocks
4)blocks are compared
5)In the output the Percentage of similarity is printed

My function compares every pixel of blocks in image

  float imCompBMA(float **b1, float **b2, float h, float w){
    float percent;
    int i, j, counter=0;

    for(i=0;i<h;i++){
        for(j=0;j<w;j++){
            // If both blocks have the same value at pixel (i,j)
            //this line has to be improved
            if(b1[i][j]==b2[i][j]){
                counter++;
            }
        }
    }

    // Percent is the number of same pixels to the total number of pixels
    percent=(float)(counter/(h*w))*100;
    return percent;
}

So how can I improve it by comparing average number of bits in each block

Thanks in advance

share|improve this question
    
What do you mean the average number of bits in each block? Each pixel in each block has the same number of bits. – Shaun Marko Dec 3 '12 at 20:11

If your goal rather has to do something with image comparison and not "block matching", I would suggest looking up explanations on Opencv templateMatching.

share|improve this answer

If you are looking for all the bits in a block to be the same then you innevitably have to read all the bits in each block!

This probably isn't the best approach if you are trying to compare real images. Even if the two raw images started out the same, loading and saving in most packages will make small individual but changes (as they are converted into different color spaces and back) and of course savings as a format like jpeg will change all the bits.

edit: if you are trying to just count bits then get an int (or long, or longlong) pointer to a block of pixels on a row and count the bits in that int - see k&r bitcounter

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the reply, i am not looking for the same bits i want take average number of bits in each block, compare them and output the difference between original image and Test image – mydreamadsl Dec 3 '12 at 18:49

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