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I have various Node, Token and other classes. Each class has its own Type enum.

I have lists of nodes, and lists of tokens, and lists of other things.

And I often want to see if there are any items of a particular Type in a list.

For example, to see if there are any keywords in a list of tokens, I'd loop over them:

Token found = null;
for(Token token: statement)
    if(token.type == Token.Type.KEYWORD &&
      (token.token.equals("static") ||
      (token.token.equals("final")) {
        found = token;
        break;
    }
if(found != null) {
    ....

If I write little helpers, I can tidy up my code a lot (as I want to work out what's in lists a lot):

Token any(Collection<Token> haystack,Token.Type type,String... needles) {
   for(Token straw: haystack)
       if(straw.type == type)
            for(String needle: needles)
                if(needle.equals(straw.token))
                    return straw;
   return null;
}

Then, elsewhere, I can:

if((found = any(statement,Token.Type.KEYWORD,"static","final")) != null)
   ...

Is there any way to generalise this for Node and other variables, and for comparisons that are not strings and where the fields are different, and named differently?

With C++ templates you can duck type; with Java, I'm struggling to see how to do this although making classes comparable to their own types and so on might be a way forward?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Things that you would use duck typing for can usually be accomplished with interfaces in java. Consider this interface:

public interface Typed<T extends Enum<T>> {
    T getType();
    String getToken();
}

Then you can change your any method to use only types that implement this interface:

public <A extends Enum<A>, B extends Typed<A>> B any(Collection<B> haystack, A type, String... needles) {
    for (B straw : haystack)
        if (straw.getType().equals(type))
            for (String needle : needles)
                if (needle.equals(straw.getToken()))
                    return straw;
    return null;
}
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You can use duck typing with reflections in Java but it is likely to be

  • more complicated, rather than simpler
  • much more error prone

I suggest you stick to what is simplest to write and understand.

FOUND: {
  for(Token token: statement)
    if(token.type == Token.Type.KEYWORD &&
      (token.token.equals("static") ||
      (token.token.equals("final")) {
        // handle token here
        break FOUND;
    }
  // handle not found here
}

instead of using a label you can create a method and return when you found a match.

I suspect the KEYWORD check is redundant here as I assume you can't have static or final and it not be a keyword. A more efficient way of doing this is something like.

static final List<String> KEYWORDS_TO_MATCH = Arrays.asList("static", "final");

FOUND: {
   for(Token token: statement)
     if(KEYWORDS_TO_MATCH.contains(token.token)) {
        // handle token here
        break FOUND;
     }
   // handle not found here
}
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