Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What is better for an arm based arch ?

struct my_struct{
    struct device   *dev;
    unsigned char   a:1,
            b:1,
            v:1,
            d:1;
};

Or to define a char and use bit wise operations:

struct my_struct{
    struct device   *dev;
    unsigned char abcd;
};
share|improve this question
    
@auselen yes, thanks, what if it isn't unsigned char just unsigned? –  0x90 Dec 3 '12 at 19:51
    
that would be an int afaik. –  auselen Dec 3 '12 at 20:11
    
bitfields are bad and should be avoided in general. –  dwelch Dec 3 '12 at 23:24

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Bit-field packing order is implementation-defined. It means that if you declare

struct my_struct {
    struct device  *dev;
    unsigned char   a:1,
                    b:1,
                    c:1,
                    d:1;
};

it is completely up to the compiler to decide where a or b or c or d actually reside in. (GCC and some other compilers do define __BIG_ENDIAN_BITFIELD or __LITTLE_ENDIAN_BITFIELD depending on how they pack bitfields, though.)

On the other hand, if you define

struct my_struct {
    struct device  *dev;
    unsigned char   abcd;
};
#define MASK_A  (1U << 0U)
#define MASK_B  (1U << 1U)
#define MASK_C  (1U << 2U)
#define MASK_D  (1U << 3U)

static inline unsigned char get(const struct my_struct *const m, const unsigned char mask)
{
    return m->abcd & mask;
}

static inline unsigned char set(struct my_struct *const m, const unsigned char mask, const unsigned char value)
{
    m->abcd = (m->abcd & mask) | (mask & value);
    return m->abcd & mask;
}

static inline unsigned char flip(struct my_struct *const m, const unsigned char mask)
{
    m->abcd ^= mask;
    return m->abcd & mask;
}

you know that a maps to the least significant bit in the byte following the pointer, b to the second bit, c third, and d fourth.

If your C compiler supports static inline, then these functions are as fast as macros, but don't have the issues macros have wrt. side effects.

This also allows you to manipulate the bit fields as a group. For example, to set b in structure t you'd use set(&t, MASK_B, MASK_B). To set b but clear a, you'd use set(&t, MASK_A | MASK_B, MASK_B). To test if a is set, use get(&t, MASK_A). To test if a or b is set, use get(&t, MASK_A | MASK_B). To check if both a and b are set, use (get(&t, MASK_A | MASK_B)) == (MASK_A | MASK_B)). All three functions return the resulting bit mask, with the mask applied, i.e. all other bits zero.

Personally, I prefer this latter approach, mostly because I feel it is more explicit (I am fully in control), more versatile (allows me to manipulate them not only individually, but also in groups), and more space efficient (since compilers tend to add padding, unless you explicitly tell them not to via e.g. command-line switches). Depending on the way you use the flags, I recommend you access them via macros or static inline functions.

That said, if the structure is internal to the application, never stored in mass storage or transmitted, I would not have any real objections to either approach.

share|improve this answer

I don't think the architecture of the processor matters for this question. In many respects it is purely a style question.

In my experience most people tend to use unsigned integers and bit-wise operations:

#define MASK_B 0x20;
unsigned char field;
int b_is_set = field & MASK_B;

The bitfields never really seemed to take off in mainstream code.

That being said, I would use whichever feels more natural to you.

share|improve this answer
    
That said, if it's likely you and/or your code ever needs to interface with "mainstream code", it's helpful to at least make mainstream your 2nd nature. –  FrankH. Dec 5 '12 at 8:54

Very first thing to do is thinking about alignment, read more about those issues unaligned-memory-access and mem_alignment .

Scalability or overhead is second very important thing. If this structure will be allocated many times, for example caching entries or using it with structures like file system internals then you need to keep things compact.

Readability is also very important too, but since this is an OS kernel we are talking about which you need to provide performance as well as maintenance, it is a trade off you should consciously make.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.