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I'm getting a CUDA_EXCEPTION_5, Warp Out-of-range Address error and I'm trying to figure out the various scenarios that can cause that.

I'm working on porting a C project (written by somebody else) to CUDA. The C code is very register-heavy, instantiating many arrays in the stack. I'm assuming register overflowing is very likely to be occuring and that may be triggering the warp out-of-range error.

Note that I want to get it working running first then I will begin optimizing the code.

I'm using Compute Capable 3.0 hardware which according to Wikipedia has 512KB of "local memory per thread". I read elsewhere it has 512KB of register space per SM. Is it possible to have 512KB of register space per running thread?

I'm currently executing my kernel as follows (yes I know it's ultra-slow):

dim3 grid(28800,1);
cuPlotLRMap<<<grid,1>>>(...)

Some details (I don't know how helpful this will be):

My hardware has 7 SMs. There are 112 running blocks, so does this mean each block gets 1/16th of 512k worth of register space?

I also understand if a thread exceeds the register space it can overflow into global memory. Is it possible for concurrent threads to overflow into the same global memory space when this occurs?

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There is no such thing as "register overflowing" in CUDA. The GPU uses static, compile time allocated register assignment. There can never be "overflowing" or out of bounds register access. –  talonmies Dec 3 '12 at 19:39
    
@talonmies ok so declaring a gigantic array in a kernel (ie: int n = 44800; float* s = new float[n];) may be ultra-slow but shouldn't be the cause of the above kernel exception? The stack is limitless? Am I chasing a red herring? Does the creation of a variable using the new keyword put the variable in global memory or does it stay in local memory? –  Sean Dec 3 '12 at 19:46
    
@talonmies I'm going to step back a bit and ask a question about the debugger in another thread. I may be misunderstanding what I have to look for. –  Sean Dec 3 '12 at 19:54
    
Obviously the runtime stack isn't limitless, but that is a completely different question from what you asked. The Warp Out-of-range Address error usually means code is out-of-bounds indexing either a shared memory or local memory array. –  talonmies Dec 3 '12 at 20:39
2  
have you run your code with cuda-memcheck? –  Robert Crovella Dec 3 '12 at 21:19

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

512KB of "local memory per thread". I read elsewhere it has 512KB of register space per SM. Is it possible to have 512KB of register space per running thread?

See Compute Capabilities table in the CUDA C Programming Guide. Compute capbility 2.x and above devices support a maximum of 512KB of local memory per thread. The function cudaDeviceSetLimit( cudaLimitStackSize, bytesPerThread ) can be used to set the value. I believe the default is 2 KB per thread.

My hardware has 7 SMs. There are 112 running blocks, so does this mean each block gets 1/16th of 512k worth of register space?

Compute capbility 3.x devices can have at most 16 resides blocks per multiprocessor. This assumes that your registers/thread, threads/block, or shared memory/block does not limit the kernel to less than the device maximum. The Visual Profiler and Nsight VSE CUDA Profiler the configuration used by your kernel.

Currently, you are only launching 1 thread/block. You should be launching a multiple of WARP_SIZE per block (32).

I also understand if a thread exceeds the register space it can overflow into global memory. Is it possible for concurrent threads to overflow into the same global memory space when this occurs?

At compile or JIT time the compiler will perform register allocation. If there are insufficient registers per thread then the compiler will spill to local memory. This operation is deterministic and not determined at runtime.

Compute capability 3.0 devices are limited to 63 registers/thread. Compute capability 3.5 devices are limited to 255 registers per thread.

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Thanks for the explanation. If the compiler decided to store an array in local memory does each element in the array take up one of the registers or does the entire array take one register of 63? –  Sean Dec 4 '12 at 16:28
    
@Sean: local memory doesn't reside in the register file. It is stored in a protected, per thread allocation of global memory. –  talonmies Dec 5 '12 at 6:11

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