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I would like to make anagram algorithm but This code doesn't work. Where is my fault ? For example des and sed is anagram but output is not anagram Meanwhile I have to use string method. not array. :)

public static boolean isAnagram(String s1 , String s2)
{
    String delStr="";
    String newStr="";

    for(int i=0;i<s1.length();i++)
    {
        for(int j=0 ; j < s2.length() ; j++)
        {
            if(s1.charAt(i)==s2.charAt(j))
            {
                delStr=s1.substring(i,i+1);
                newStr=s2.replace(delStr,"");
            }
        }           
    }

    if(newStr.equals(""))
        return true;
    else
        return false;
}
share|improve this question
2  
Can you explain what you are seeing wrong? Does an exception throw? Does it just not return what you expect? Does it infinite-loop? –  Mike Clark Dec 3 '12 at 21:42
    
Can you give an example as to what is an Anagram in your case? –  Rohit Jain Dec 3 '12 at 21:45
    
No, only I wrote des and sed but output is not anagram –  user1873885 Dec 3 '12 at 21:45
1  
Why does your code not work? Because you overwrite newStr with s2 (less a letter) every time you get a match. For example, if s2 is ab, when you match b, newStr becomes a, then when you match a, newStr does not become the empty string, but becomes b (since it is s2 less the matching character). It is not the only bug in your code (repeated characters, different length strings), but it is the one that you are going to see first. –  Konstantin Naryshkin Dec 3 '12 at 22:10

14 Answers 14

An easier way might be to just sort the chars in both strings, and compare whether they are equal:

public static boolean isAnagram(String s1, String s2){

        // Early termination check, if strings are of unequal lengths,
        // then they cannot be anagrams
        if ( s1.length() != s2.length() ) {
            return false;
        }

        char[] c1 = s1.toCharArray();
        char[] c2 = s2.toCharArray();
        Arrays.sort(c1);
        Arrays.sort(c2);
        String sc1 = new String(c1);
        String sc2 = new String(c2);
        return sc1.equals(sc2);
}

Personally I think it's more readable than nested for-loops =p

This has O(n log n) run-time complexity, where n is the length of the longer string.

Edit: this is not the optimal solution. See @aam1r's answer for the most efficient approach (i.e. what you should actually say in an interview)

share|improve this answer
2  
lol. +1 You can use Arrays.equals() to compare the sorted arrays. –  Peter Lawrey Dec 3 '12 at 21:47
    
@PeterLawrey: Or use a simple loop, which is equivalent. But not this –  durron597 Dec 3 '12 at 21:51
    
Okey this is working but Why my code isn't working? –  user1873885 Dec 3 '12 at 21:51
1  
@user1873885 Unfortunately "isn't working" does not give me any information that I can use to help you with =( –  sampson-chen Dec 3 '12 at 21:54
    
@sampson-chen I don't understand problem. I write des and sed but input is not anagram. Meanwhile I dont use array class. Only string methods –  user1873885 Dec 3 '12 at 22:01

This can be done in linear time using constant space. Here is pseudo-code to help you get started:

// Create new hashtable/hashmap to keep track of how many times each character
// is being used
character_map -> new hash map

// Initial check. If lengths are not the same, they can't be anagrams.
if s1.length != s2.length:
    throw exception "Not anagrams"

// Add all characters from s1 to hashmap. Increment the value to keep track of
// number of occurences
foreach character c1 in s1:
    character_map[c1]++

// Iterate through all character in s2 and decrement count of each character.
foreach character c2 in s2:
    character_map[c2]--

// If they are anagrams, each character should be at "0" count at the point.
// If we come across a character that is not, it means that they are not anagrams
foreach key k, value v in character_map:
    if v != 0:
            throw exception "Not anagrams"

This code does not sort and hence can be done using simple loops. The overall runtime is O(n) and overall space is O(1) -- hence being the fastest solution. The number of elements you can have in the hash map is constant (i.e. you know how many items there are in your alphabet set).

share|improve this answer
1  
Ahh bucket sort, my hero. +1. By the way, this is O(1) space, not O(n) –  durron597 Dec 3 '12 at 22:10
3  
+1 for the amortized linear time solution everyone else overlooked! ;) –  sampson-chen Dec 3 '12 at 22:15
    
@durron597: Oops, thanks! Fixed –  aam1r Dec 3 '12 at 22:15
1  
If lengths are not the same, they can't be anagrams. -> First remove the whitespaces. –  Koray Tugay Sep 28 '13 at 22:04
if(s1.charAt(i)==s2.charAt(j))
        delStr=s1.substring(i,i+1);
        newStr=s2.replace(delStr,"");

This code is a nice demonstration of why you should always have curly braces around your if, even if there is only a single statement. Your 2nd assignment is actually outside the if-condition, and will always happen.

The best way to check for two strings to be Anagram is to convert them to a character array (String#toCharArray). Then sort them using Arrays.sort method. And do the comparison on them.


Updated : -

If you just want to use String methods, then you don't actually need a nested loop there. You can do it with just one.

Here's the modified code of yours: -

public static boolean isAnagram(String s1 , String s2){

    if (s1.length() != s2.length()) {
        return false;
    }

    for(int i = 0; i < s2.length(); i++) {

            if( !s1.contains("" + s2.charAt(i))) {
                return false;
            }

            s1 = s1.replaceFirst("" + s2.charAt(i), "");
            s2 = s2.replaceFirst("" + s2.charAt(i), "");
    }
    return true;
}
share|improve this answer
3  
Um, why all the upvotes, the code still doesn't work even with this fix –  durron597 Dec 3 '12 at 21:44
    
Yeah, i agree. It is always recommended to have curly braces around an if. –  andreih Dec 3 '12 at 21:44
    
okey.You are right but still doesn't work –  user1873885 Dec 3 '12 at 21:44
    
@user1873885. May be. But to get it to work, you need to tell what is an Anagram? I can't understand the logic of the code. –  Rohit Jain Dec 3 '12 at 21:45
    
@durron597 yepp, the code still doesnt work, thats why its not accepted yet :P, upvotes are for pointing the blunder in the code . –  PermGenError Dec 3 '12 at 21:46

I'm not sure what you're trying to do, but I'm pretty sure it won't work (and it runs in O(n^2). Try this (which runs in O(n log n)) instead:

public static boolean isAnagram(String s1, String s2){
  if (s1.length() != s2.length()) return false;

  char[] c1 = s1.toCharArray();
  char[] c2 = s2.toCharArray();

  Arrays.sort(c1);
  Arrays.sort(c2);

  for(int i = 0; i < c1.length; i++) {
    if(c1[i] != c2[i]) return false;
  }

  return true;
}
share|improve this answer
2  
+1 If you are going to check the length, I would do it before calling toCharArray. –  Peter Lawrey Dec 3 '12 at 21:48
    
@PeterLawrey: good point, fixed –  durron597 Dec 3 '12 at 21:53

What would be more efficient is to compare the Strings in sorted order.

public static boolean isAnagram(String s1 , String s2) {
    return s1.length() == s2.length() 
        && checkSum(s1) == checkSum(s2)
        && Arrays.equals(lettersSorted(s1), lettersSorted(s2));
}

static int checkSum(String s) {
    int sqrSum = 0;
    for(int i = 0; i < s.length(); s++) {
       char ch = s.charAt(i);
       sqrSum += ch * ch;
    }
}

static char[] lettersSorted(String s) {
    char chars = s.toCharArray();
    Arrays.sort(chars);
    return chars;
}

This is an O(N ln N) algo, but will be O(N) on average if the Strings are typically not anagrams.

share|improve this answer
2  
Haha, that's 3 of us so far - adage about great minds and all, eh? ;) –  sampson-chen Dec 3 '12 at 21:51
    
@sampson-chen So I added something different. ;) –  Peter Lawrey Dec 3 '12 at 21:54
1  
@PeterLawrey lol that would be faster, too bad I already upvoted you ;) –  durron597 Dec 3 '12 at 21:54

The reason it doesn't work:

Using "des" and "sed" as an example.

In the last iteration for which it matches, it will evaluate:

if(s1.charAt(i)==s2.charAt(j))
{
    delStr=s1.substring(i,i+1);
    newStr=s2.replace(delStr,"");
}

Which will be: if( "s" == "s" )

It will then enter the if block, and evaluate

newStr = "sed".replace("s","");

which will give you "ed", instead of an empty string.

The moral of the story is that you are always replacing characters from s2 less one character, which will never be empty.

Using String.replace() is bad anyway, because it will replace all instances of the character by default. With String.replace(), it would consider "sed" to be an anagram of "seeeeeeed". You would do better to use String.replaceFirst().

In any case, a starting point is to make the following modifications:

String newStr = s2;
...
// inside if block
newStr = newStr.replaceFirst( delStr, "" );
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you @cmokey I got it and problem is solved :) –  user1873885 Dec 3 '12 at 22:11

just making sure, you are trying to check to see if s1 is a anagram of s2 correct? That would also mean s2 is a an anagram of s1. So i would just sort s1 and s2 and check to see if they are equal.

String string1 = "fdafdas";
String string2 = "fdwqkjl";
char[] chars = string1.toCharArray();
char[] chars2 = string2.toCharArray();
Arrays.sort(chars);
Arrays.sort(chars2);
string1 = new String(chars);
string2 = new String(chars2);
if (string1.equals(string2)) {
    //They are an anagram
}
share|improve this answer
    
opps, didnt know so many people were posting the same thing. My bad. –  user1103205 Dec 3 '12 at 21:54
public boolean isAnagram(String a, String b) {

  boolean result = false;

  final String one = a.replaceAll("[\\s+\\W+]", "").toLowerCase();

  final String two = b.replaceAll("[\\s+\\W+]", "").toLowerCase();

  if (one.length() == two.length()) {

      final char[] oneArray =  one.toCharArray();

      final char[] twoArray =  two.toCharArray(); 

      Arrays.sort(oneArray);

      Arrays.sort(twoArray);

      result = Arrays.equals(oneArray, twoArray);

    }

  return result; 

}
share|improve this answer
    
This is elegant but has complexity of sorting algorithm. –  goroncy Feb 4 at 12:45

O(n) solution without any kind of sorting and using only one map. Also added proper null check missing in other solutions.

public boolean isAnagram(String leftString, String rightString) {
  if (leftString == null || rightString == null) {
    return false;
  } else if (leftString.length() != rightString.length()) {
    return false;
  }

  Map<Character, Integer> occurrencesMap = new HashMap<>();

  for(int i = 0; i < leftString.length(); i++){
    char charFromLeft = leftString.charAt(i);
    int nrOfCharsInLeft = occurrencesMap.containsKey(charFromLeft) ? occurrencesMap.get(charFromLeft) : 0;
    occurrencesMap.put(charFromLeft, ++nrOfCharsInLeft);
    char charFromRight = rightString.charAt(i);
    int nrOfCharsInRight = occurrencesMap.containsKey(charFromRight) ? occurrencesMap.get(charFromRight) : 0;
    occurrencesMap.put(charFromRight, --nrOfCharsInRight);
  }

  for(int occurrencesNr : occurrencesMap.values()){
    if(occurrencesNr != 0){
      return false;
    }
  }

  return true;
}

and less generic solution but a little bit faster one:

public boolean isAnagram(String leftString, String rightString) {
  if (leftString == null || rightString == null) {
    return false;
  } else if (leftString.length() != rightString.length()) {
    return false;
  }

  char letters[] = {'a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'f', 'g', 'h', 'i', 'j', 'k', 'l', 'm', 'n', 'o', 'p', 'q', 'r', 's', 't', 'u', 'v', 'w', 'x', 'y', 'z'};
  Map<Character, Integer> occurrencesMap = new HashMap<>();
  for (char l : letters) {
    occurrencesMap.put(l, 0);
  }

  for(int i = 0; i < leftString.length(); i++){
    char charFromLeft = leftString.charAt(i);
    Integer nrOfCharsInLeft = occurrencesMap.get(charFromLeft);
    occurrencesMap.put(charFromLeft, ++nrOfCharsInLeft);
    char charFromRight = rightString.charAt(i);
    Integer nrOfCharsInRight = occurrencesMap.get(charFromRight);
    occurrencesMap.put(charFromRight, --nrOfCharsInRight);
  }

  for(Integer occurrencesNr : occurrencesMap.values()){
    if(occurrencesNr != 0){
      return false;
    }
  }

  return true;
}
share|improve this answer

Here's a Simpler approach relying mostly on java The complete code is here https://github.com/rdsr/algorithms/blob/master/src/jvm/misc/AnagramsList.java (Note this solves a related by different problem)

class Anagram {
    Map<Character, Integer> anagram;

    Anagram(String s) {
        anagram = new HashMap<Character, Integer>();

        for (final Character c : s.toCharArray()) {
            if (anagram.containsKey(c)) {
                anagram.put(c, 1 + anagram.get(c));
            } else {
                anagram.put(c, 1);
            }
        }
    }

    @Override
    public int hashCode() {
        //.. elided
    }

    @Override
    public boolean equals(Object obj) {
        //.. elided
    }
}


    public class Anagrams {
            public static void main(String[] args) {
                System.out.println(new Anagram("abc").equals(new Anagram("bac")));
            }
        }
share|improve this answer
    
One suggestion. you can get anagram.get(c) and check null instead of containsKey ( you are iterating two times just to check ) –  Mani Apr 12 at 13:19

Faster version using bit vector approach for anagram substrings

public boolean isAnagram(String _source1, String _source2)
{

    int flag = 0, char_index = 0, counter = 0;
    if(_source2.length() < _source1.length()){
        return false;
    }
    char[] _stringchar = _source1.toCharArray();
    char[] _tocheck = _source2.toCharArray();
    for(char character : _stringchar)
    {
        char_index = character - 'a';
        if((flag & (1 << char_index)) == 0)
            flag |= (1 << char_index);
    }

    for(char toCheckcChar : _tocheck)
    {
        char_index = toCheckcChar - 'a';

        if((flag & (1 << char_index)) > 0)
            counter++;
        else
            counter = 0;

        if(counter == _source1.length())
            return true;

    }

    return false;
}
share|improve this answer

The simple reason is, because replace function creates a new String object. It does not do anything to the actual string (in your case s2), because in Java, strings are final by nature. So as pointed out by cmonkey, you are always removing one character from your string s2, but in reality a new String object is created with 1 character less, s2 remains as is.

The simple way to get this working in your case would be to create a new string object and assign it to yourself.

{
    s2=s2.replace(delString,"");
    ....
    if(s2.empty()) return true;
    return false;
}
share|improve this answer
import java.util.*;
class Anagrams 
{
    public static void main(String[] args) 
    {
        System.out.println("Enter the two words");
        Scanner scan = new Scanner(System.in);
        String word1 = scan.next();
        String word2=scan.next();

        StringBuilder sb1= new StringBuilder(word1);
        StringBuilder sb2= new StringBuilder(word2);
        int count=0;
        System.out.println("length ! "+sb1.length());
        System.out.println("Length ! "+sb2.length());
        if(sb1.length()==sb2.length()){
            for(int i=0;i<sb1.length();i++){
                for(int k=0;k<sb2.length();k++){
                    if(sb1.charAt(i)==sb2.charAt(k)){
                        sb2.deleteCharAt(k);
                        count++;
                        System.out.println("Count is "+count);
                        break;
                    }
                }
            }

            if(count==sb1.length()){

                System.out.println("Anagrams!");
            }
            else{
                System.out.println("Not Anagrams");
            }
        }
        else{
            System.out.println("Not equal in length");
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Maybe some more explanation? –  Undo Apr 25 '13 at 13:27

I guess the following solution has O(n) complexity, let me know if someone differs.

import java.util.HashMap; import java.util.Scanner;

public class Anagrams {

static boolean isAnagram(String word1, String word2)
{
    if(word1.length() != word2.length())
    {
        return false;
    }
    int flag=0;
    HashMap<Character,Integer> table = new HashMap<Character,Integer>();
    for(int i=0; i< word1.length();i++)
    {
        table.put(word1.charAt(i),1);
    }

    for(int i=0; i< word2.length();i++)
    {
        if(table.containsKey(word2.charAt(i)))
        {
            continue;
        }
        else
        {
            flag=1;
            break;
        }   
    }

    if(flag==0)
        return true;
    else
        return false;



}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    System.out.println("Enter your string");
    Scanner sc= new Scanner(System.in);
    String word1= sc.nextLine();
    String word2=sc.nextLine();

     boolean result = isAnagram(word1,word2);
     if(result==true)
     System.out.println("The words are Anagrams");
     else
         System.out.println("The words are not Anagrams");   

}

}

share|improve this answer
    
Calling a map 'table' :(. Using continue and break when not necessary. Eh. –  goroncy Feb 4 at 12:43
    
@goroncy I would like you to modify and post if you want to make it better. "table" is just a random name, I am not using this code in some real-life product. Was just practicing. –  Sahil Madan Feb 4 at 17:16
    
Yeah. Continue and break still remains though. –  goroncy Feb 4 at 17:44

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