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I am trying to utilize shared function (in main thread) and use it from 3 threads. The function will do some potentially lengthy operation like disk write and to avoid possible problems I will lock it. I use Indy IdThreadComponent and TCriticalSection. Here is how it looks:

//---------------------------------------------------------------------------
// In header file
//---------------------------------------------------------------------------
boost::scoped_ptr<TCriticalSection> csShared;

//---------------------------------------------------------------------------
// Main file
//---------------------------------------------------------------------------

__fastcall TForm1::TForm1(TComponent* Owner) : TForm(Owner)
{
csShared.reset(new TCriticalSection);
}
//---------------------------------------------------------------------------
void __fastcall TForm1::SharedFunction(UnicodeString TextData)
{
try
    {
    csShared->Enter();           // As suggested by Remy this is placed incorrectly and needs to be moved outside of try block
    //Memo1->Lines->Add(TextData); // [EDIT] calling this within thread is wrong
    Sleep(2000);
    }
__finally
    {
    csShared->Leave();
    }
}
//---------------------------------------------------------------------------
void __fastcall TForm1::IdThreadComponent1Run(TIdThreadComponent *Sender)
{
SharedFunction("Thread 1 calling");
IdThreadComponent1->Stop();
}
//---------------------------------------------------------------------------
void __fastcall TForm1::IdThreadComponent2Run(TIdThreadComponent *Sender)
{
SharedFunction("Thread 2 calling");
IdThreadComponent2->Stop();
}
//---------------------------------------------------------------------------
void __fastcall TForm1::IdThreadComponent3Run(TIdThreadComponent *Sender)
{
SharedFunction("Thread 3 calling");
IdThreadComponent3->Stop();
}
//---------------------------------------------------------------------------
void __fastcall TForm1::Button1Click(TObject *Sender)
{
IdThreadComponent1->Start();
IdThreadComponent2->Start();
IdThreadComponent3->Start();
}
//---------------------------------------------------------------------------
void __fastcall TForm1::FormCloseQuery(TObject *Sender, bool &CanClose)
{
// Note - these 3 Stop() calls are used if threads are set to run infinitely
// But in this example it is not needed as they stop themselves
//IdThreadComponent1->Stop();
//IdThreadComponent2->Stop();
//IdThreadComponent3->Stop();

// Now wait for lock to be released [WRONG - COMMENTED IN EDIT]
//while (!csShared->TryEnter())
//  {
//  Sleep(500);
//  }
//csShared->Leave();

// [EDIT v1] easier and faster way to wait than above
//csShared->Enter();
//csShared->Leave();

// [EDIT v2] block exit until all threads are done
while (IdThreadComponent1->Active || IdThreadComponent2->Active || IdThreadComponent3->Active)
{
Sleep(200); // make wait loop less CPU intensive
};

CanClose = true;
}
//---------------------------------------------------------------------------

The problems:

- If I close window quickly (only one thread executes the function, it never leaves program - waits forever, and in debugger only first thread exits, other two don't). I am using OnCloseQuery event to check if threads are done. What I am doing wrong?

[EDIT] After removing Memo1->Lines->Add(TextData); as suggested in comments by David Heffernan, it exits properly so this part of question is solved and the following remains:

  • Is it fine to call csShared->Enter(); inside the shared function like above or do I have to call it outside of it in each thread like this:

    void __fastcall TForm1::IdThreadComponent1Run(TIdThreadComponent *Sender)
    {
    csShared->Enter();
    SharedFunction("Thread 1 calling");
    csShared->Leave();
    IdThreadComponent1->Stop();
    }
    
  • Is this better than the above version (calling csShared->Enter(); within the function itself)? Or the same? Both versions seem to work fine, I am wondering is there a difference, because the first one is cleaner.

I do not need Synchronize in case if you are wondering, this will be for disk write and not for updating VCL, so the above SharedFunction is just for the example purpose.

share|improve this question
1  
Do you know that you are not allowed to do GUI work away from the GUI thread. Your program appears to violate that rule. – David Heffernan Dec 3 '12 at 22:09
    
Let's suppose that I don't put things in Memo in that function. The shared function is just an example but in reality it would be something that writes to disk and is potentially lengthy. – Coder12345 Dec 3 '12 at 22:12
1  
That loop around the TryEnter is a disaster. Just call Enter. That will block until the lock is aquired. – David Heffernan Dec 3 '12 at 22:22
1  
No, it does not work. It does not block until the threads finish. It just aquires and then releases a lock. If you want to block until something happens you need a wait function. – David Heffernan Dec 4 '12 at 9:44
1  
That's still not a great wait function because it will spin at 100% CPU. – David Heffernan Dec 4 '12 at 10:07
up vote 3 down vote accepted

It is fine, even desirable, to put the calls to Enter() and Leave() inside of the shared function. However, if you are going to use try/__finally then you need to put the Enter() outside of the try, in case it fails. You don't want to Leave() something you did not successful Enter() into, eg:

void __fastcall TForm1::SharedFunction(UnicodeString TextData)
{
    csShared->Enter();
    try
    {
        //...
        Sleep(2000);
    }
    __finally
    {
        csShared->Leave();
    }
}

void __fastcall TForm1::IdThreadComponent1Run(TIdThreadComponent *Sender)
{
    SharedFunction("Thread 1 calling");
    IdThreadComponent1->Stop();
}

Since you are using Boost anyway, you should make use of its own mutex and lock classes instead, then you don't have to worry about try/__finally, Enter(), or Leave() at all, eg:

#include <boost/thread/recursive_mutex.hpp>
#include <boost/thread/locks.hpp>

boost::recursive_mutex mutex;

void __fastcall TForm1::SharedFunction(UnicodeString TextData)
{
    boost::lock_guard<boost::recursive_mutex> lock(mutex);
    //...
    Sleep(2000);
}

As for the TMemo access, use the TIdSync or TIdNotify class to execute that code in a thread-safe manner, eg:

#include <IdSync.hpp>

class TMemoNotify : public TIdNotify
{
protected:
    String TextData;

    void __fastcall DoNotify()
    {
        Form1->Memo1->Lines->Add(TextData);
    }

public:
    __fastcall TMemoNotify(const String &ATextData) : TextData(ATextData) {}
};


void __fastcall TForm1::SharedFunction(UnicodeString TextData)
{
    ...
    (new TMemoNotify(TextData))->Notify(); // TIdNotify is self-freeing
    ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
Just another in series of your excellent answers Remy! Always spot on to the point. – Coder12345 Dec 4 '12 at 9:41
    
I may just correct you that the correct header for recursive mutex is #include <boost/thread/recursive_mutex.hpp> – Coder12345 Dec 12 '12 at 18:00

I am trying to utilize shared function (in main thread) and use it from 3 threads.

A method or procedure (generally a piece of code) does not belong to a thread per se. Any piece of code can potentially be called from any thread within the application, and it can be running multiple times at the same time if called from different threads in a concurrent fashion.

For example

procedure A();
begin
  //do some work.
end;

You can have a execution like this:

main thread
     |
  SomeFunc();
     |
     |      spawns
     |     thread X  
     |---------|
     |         |
     |         |
     |      OtherF()
    A()        |
     |         |   spawns thread Y
     |         |-------------|
     |        A()            |
     |         |             |
     |         |            A()
     |         |             | 
     |         |             |
  t1>|         |             |
     |         |             |
   A returns   |             |
    B()        |             |
     |         |             |
  t2>|         |             |
     |         |             |
     |        A returns      |
     |        thread end     |
     |                       |
     |                       |
  t3>|                       |
     |                      A returns
     |                      thread end
     |
   program end

At t1, 3 different threads are running the function A(), at t2, 2 thread are still running it (X and Y) and at t3 only one thread executes that function (thread Y).

Is it fine to call csShared->Enter(); inside the shared function like above or do I have to call it outside of it in each thread like this:

This is up to you. You have to define where to call it, as you are the responsible to define what pieces of code must be running only in the context of one thread while others will be waiting for this to finish to start (serial execution).

  • If the entire function body is to be serialized, I think it's better to put the critical section Enter inside the function (as the first line), since IMHO this leads to cleaner code in the calling sites, while ensuring you can't forget to enter the critical section before calling the function.
  • If the function call is part of a more complex operation, you have to call the CriticalSection enter at the start of that operation, obviusly outside the function body.
  • It is possible also to have parts of the function that can be running in parallel, so you must favor concurrency and call the CriticalSection.Enter only when needed inside your function.

Remember each CriticalSection is a bottleneck. A intentional one, but you have to use it with caution to avoid introducing waits where is not really needed.

share|improve this answer
1  
Of course it is bottleneck, but so is disk-operation and functions need consistent disk-data (where I will actually apply this), therefore blocking is needed. Excellent answer though, I would mark this one as answer but I can only mark one and Remy's was just a little bit more to the point. So I up-voted this (and others should too, both are great answers), anyway I appreciate your explanation! I'm learning a lot here. – Coder12345 Dec 4 '12 at 9:49

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