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I am tying to get around how you will multiply the values in 2 arrays (as an input) to get an output. The problem I have is the how to increment the loops to achieve the task shown below

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

main()
{
 int* filter1, *signal, fsize1 = 0, fsize2 = 0, i = 0;

 cout << " enter size of filter and signal" << endl;
 cin >> fsize1 >> fsize2;

filter1 = new int [fsize1];
signal = new int [fsize2];

cout << " enter filter  values" << endl;
for (i = 0; i < fsize1; i++)
cin >> filter1[i];
 cout << " enter  signal values" << endl;
for (i = 0; i < fsize2; i++)
cin >> signal[i];

/*

The two arrays should be filled by users but use the arrays below for test:

int array1[6] = {2, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9};
int array2[3] = {1, 2, 3};

The output array should be

array3[8]= {1 * 2, (1 * 4 + 2 * 2), (1 * 6 + 2 * 4 + 3 * 2), (1 * 7 + 2 * 6 + 3 * 4), (1 * 8 + 2 * 7 + 3 * 6), (1 * 9 + 2 * 8 + 3 * 7), (2 * 9 + 3 * 8), 3 * 9}


*/


 return 0;
 }

This is part of a bigger task concerning filter of a sampled signal but it is this multiplication that I cant get done.

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closed as not a real question by KillianDS, Luchian Grigore, dreamcrash, djechlin, Alessandro Minoccheri Dec 4 '12 at 7:30

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3  
Have you tried anything, or expect us to give you the code? –  Luchian Grigore Dec 3 '12 at 22:41
    
Use for loops to iterate through the arrays and multiply them. –  Gustavo Litovsky Dec 3 '12 at 22:47
2  
Because this is such a basic thing to do, I really recommend that you pick up a programming book: stackoverflow.com/questions/562303/… –  Gustavo Litovsky Dec 3 '12 at 22:49
    
This isn't multiplication - this is convolution. –  Paul R Dec 3 '12 at 23:02
    
Maybe I'm a bit dense, but I'm unclear on the pattern of products that you're after. You have provided the first three and last three, but I have no idea what the middle three are. Should this work for input arrays of any size? Can the second array be bigger than the first? Can they be the same size? I need to know the algorithm before I can tell you how to program it. –  csj Dec 3 '12 at 23:08

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I haven't read a word about convolution in a good 7 years. The following code (which works on your test values) is based entirely on your examples. Since you have not articulated the required algorithm in any formal manner, I cannot be sure that this code will produce the desired output for other inputs.

I have changed around some of your variable names, and re-ordered some of the code you provided so I could actually think through things.

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

void main ()
{
    int *signal, *filter, signalLength = 0, filterLength = 0, i = 0;

    cout << "Enter size of signal and filter" << endl;
    cin >> signalLength >> filterLength;

    signal = new int [signalLength];
    filter = new int [filterLength];

    cout << "Enter  signal values" << endl;
    for (i = 0; i < signalLength; i++)
    {
        cin >> signal[i];
    }

    cout << "Enter filter  values" << endl;
    for (i = 0; i < filterLength; i++)
    {
        cin >> filter[i];
    }

    // It was a stated requirement that the filter array be smaller than
    // the signal array.
    // add a check here and act accordingly

    int outputLength = signalLength + filterLength - 1;
    int *output = new int[outputLength];
    int signalLeft = 0;
    int signalRight = 1;
    int filterLeft = 0;
    int filterRight = 1;
    int outputIndex = 0;
    while (signalLeft < signalLength)
    {
        int indexWidth = signalRight - signalLeft;


        // I sure hope I've interpretted your question correctly.
        // I recommend you read over this loop
        // carefully to ensure it matches your understanding of the problem at hand.
        output[outputIndex] = 0;
        int j = 0;
        while (j < indexWidth)
        {
            output[outputIndex] += signal[signalLeft + j] * 
                                   filter[filterRight - j - 1];

            ++j;
        }


        // The left and right indexes will start the loop 1 index apart
        // The right indexes will increment until the distance between
        //    left and right is equal to the length of the filter array.
        // Then, the signal indexes will increment until the right signal
        //   index is equal to the length of the signal array.
        // Then, both left indexes will increment until the left and right
        //   indexes are again 1 index apart.
        if (filterRight < filterLength)
        {
            ++signalRight;
            ++filterRight;
        }
        else if (signalRight < signalLength)
        {
            ++signalLeft;
            ++signalRight;
        }
        else
        {
            ++signalLeft;
            ++filterLeft;
        }

        ++outputIndex;
    }


    for (i = 0; i < outputLength; ++i)
    {
            cout << i << ": " << output[i] << endl;
    }


    char dummy;
    cin >> dummy;
}
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Take a look here for information on convolution.

Once you understand the process, then it should not be that difficult to code. There's also a C++ algorithm for 2-dimensional convolution included at this website.

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Okay... I will check that out. Thanks –  toby Dec 3 '12 at 23:45

Suppose you have three arrays of length N:

  • input1, the first input array
  • input2, the second input array
  • output, the output array

Then, for i from 0 to N - 1, loop and put the result of input1[i] * input2[i] into output[i] (assuming dot product).

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doesn't look much like dotproduct. It looks like an underspecified algorithm, really. A logical continuation after 1*2,(1*4+2*2),(1*6+2*4+3*2) could be (1*7+2*6+3*4) or indeed (1*4) or even immediately (1*9+2*8+3*7) –  sehe Dec 3 '12 at 22:55
    
@sehe: right. I used dot product as an example to give few basic pointers on looping. –  Danilo Piazzalunga Dec 3 '12 at 23:01
1  
It's convolution, as used in digital filtering etc (FIR filters). –  Paul R Dec 3 '12 at 23:02
    
sorry for being unclear, I have filled in the output array –  toby Dec 3 '12 at 23:12
    
@PaulR; thanks! Now I am at a loss, because I only know about convolution in the continuous case. –  Danilo Piazzalunga Dec 3 '12 at 23:13
int newLength = fSize1 + fSize2 - 1;

int *array3 = new int[newLength];
int count = 0;

// initialize all array3 value to 0
for(int k = 0; k<newLength; k++)
{
    array3[k] = 0;
}

for(int i = 0; i<newLength; i++)
{
    for(int j = 0; j<fSize2; j++)
    {
        // to avoid outofbound error
        if(i==0)
            array3[i] = array2[i] * array1[j];
        else
            array3[i] = array3[i- 1] + (array2[i] * array1[j]);
    }
}

Hope this helps.

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